Popular Music and Public Diplomacy

Technische Universität Dortmund, Germany
6-8 November 2015

Call for Papers

In the early years of the Cold War, Western nations increasingly turned towards popular music in their public diplomacy. While the diplomatic use of popular music was initially limited to such genres as jazz and gospel, the second half of the twentieth century saw a growing presence of various popular genres in diplomatic contexts, including country, bluegrass, rock, punk, reggae, and hip-hop. As an instrument of public diplomacy, popular music plays a complex role in contested terrain. Whether it functions as cultural subversion, as a reaffirmation of cultural hegemony, or as a combination of both is conditioned by a web of interdependent factors ranging from the music itself to its mediation and appropriation in different contexts.

Music diplomacy has not only impacted the ways in which audiences perceive foreign cultures, but it has also helped to shape the cultural horizons of politicians, diplomats, cultural managers, journalists, and musicians involved in diplomatic programs. In this way, music diplomacy has had highly significant cultural and aesthetic effects. The musicians’ role as their countries’ cultural ambassadors, for instance, had the potential to lead to radical transformations in the way they were perceived at home, forcing them to reconfigure their rhetorical and musical legitimation as artists. In a way, the diplomatic usability of musicians as ambassadors is an aesthetic and performative benchmark by means of which artists have re-defined themselves and their work. International cultural exchange with local musicians in host countries likewise inspired musical ambassadors to venture into previously unknown musical and cultural territories, thus impacting their aesthetics and oeuvres.

This conference seeks to illuminate the diplomatic function of popular music from a transnational and transdisciplinary perspective, accentuating its interconnectivity and dissemination across national borders. We are particularly interested in the nexus of power, popularity, aesthetics, and cultural exchange. How did popular music function in the ideological conflict between East and West, for instance, and how did its function change after the fall of the Iron Curtain? How did U.S. popular music programs interact with other nations’ initiatives to channel their self-representation through popular music? Who are the agents, stakeholders, and gatekeepers of popular music diplomacy? What is the role of celebrity in music diplomacy? Has popular music been an “efficient” instrument of national and communal self-representation and how do institutions measure its efficiency?

Proposals:
We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines, including cultural studies, musicology, ethnomusicology, political science, diplomacy studies, history, sociology, literature, international relations, and other relevant fields. Proposals should include a title, 250 word abstract, technical requirements, and short biographical sketch. Please submit your proposal by 1 April 2015 to musicaldiplomacy2015@gmail.com.

Keynote speakers include Martha Bayles (Boston College, U.S.) and Klaus Nathaus (University of Oslo, Norway).

The conference is hosted by the English Department and the Department of Music and Musicology at TU Dortmund University, Germany.

Organizing Committee:
Mario Dunkel (TU Dortmund University, Germany)
Sina Nitzsche (TU Dortmund University, Germany)

Conference website: www.musicaldiplomacy.org

Current Musicology 50th Anniversary Conference

March 28-29, 2015, Columbia University

The journal Current Musicology is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary with an open-themed conference on March 28-29, 2015, to take place in Rooms 522-523, Butler Library, Columbia University. The conference is free and open to the public.

Over the two days, the event will feature paper presentations given by scholars from across Canada, Europe, and the United States. We are very pleased to welcome back founding editor Professor Emeritus Austin Clarkson (York University), as well as former editors Professors Anthony Barone (University of Nevada), Eleonora Beck (Lewis & Clark College), Murray Dineen (University of Ottawa), Peter Lefferts (University of Nebraska-Lincoln), and Karen Painter (University of Minnesota), who will all give paper presentations. Georgina Born, Professor of Music and Anthropology at the University of Oxford, will give the keynote address. The conference will also feature a roundtable discussion titled The Future of Music Studies, involving Professors Kofi Agawu (Princeton University), Lydia Goehr (Columbia University), Lawrence Kramer (Fordham University), George Lewis (Columbia University), and Ingrid Monson (Harvard University).

For more information, visit www.currentmusicologyconference.com.

XXII ANNUAL CONFERENCE SOCIETY ITALIAN OF MUSICOLOGY

XXII ANNUAL CONFERENCE SOCIETY ITALIAN OF MUSICOLOGY

Perugia, Conservatorio di musica “Francesco Morlacchi”

30-31 ottobre, 1 novembre 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

The twenty-second Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society will be hosted in Perugia  from 30th October to 1st  November 2015, in collaboration with the Conservatory of Music “Francesco Morlacchi”. On October 31st at 4 p.m. the annual Meeting of all members will take place .

The Conference will be divided in 4 free paper sessions and 2 theme-oriented sessions about

  1. musical sources and new research topics;
  2. new acquisitions in organology.

 

Scholars from all over the world are invited to submit their proposals.

In your abstract (which has not to exceed 30 lines in word format compatible) please indicate the title of the proposed paper, the state of the art in your research field, with an outline of the project and the specific contribution to the current knowledge.

Along with the text please send also a short C/V (max. 15 lines) and indicate the A/V equipment required.

The paper shall not exceed 20 minutes in duration (corresponding to an 8-page text containing to a maximum of 16000 characters). Scholars are not allowed to send more than one abstract. The abstracts have to be sent to the e-mail address sellerfrancesca@gmail.com or – by mail – to the Società Italiana di Musicologia, Casella Postale 318 Ag. Roma Acilia, via Saponara 00125 Rome, Italy (please add on the envelope the indication “XXII Convegno Annuale”) no later than June 15, 2015.

Acceptance of papers will be notified by July, 15, 2015.

Please provide your full name, address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address. For further information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.sidm.it.

 

Ninth Annual Congress of the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM), Cape Town, 16-18 July 2015

SASRIM cordially invites you to its ninth annual congress to be held at the South African College of Music, University of Cape Town, South Africa, 16-18 July 2015.

This year, for the first time, two keynote speakers were approached to speak at SASRIM’s annual congress, namely Christopher Ballantine (emeritus professor, University of KwaZulu-Natal) and Lydia Goehr (professor, Columbia University). We look forward to these influential scholars’ presentations which will be a highlight of the conference.

Submissions are invited on any research topic related to music. Presentations will be accepted solely on the basis of their quality, and will not be limited to any particular subject matter or research approach. SASRIM hopes to encourage the submission of a wide variety of proposals, including those that cross disciplinary boundaries and offer new perspectives.

We extend a special invitation to undergraduate and postgraduate students to submit proposals and/or attend the congress, and thereby use SASRIM as a forum for intellectual growth, networking and career development. Students whose proposals are accepted may apply to SASRIM for limited financial support.

See you in Cape Town in July!

See the SASRIM 2015 Conference Website for more information.

Performance Studies Network Fourth International Conference

Bath Spa University 14-17 July 2016

The international Performance Studies Network comprises professional and amateur musicians, scholars working in a range of musicological disciplines (including music history, analysis, psychology, pedagogy, ethnomusicology and composition), and colleagues from the creative industries. Initially funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council, the Research Centre for Musical Performance as Creative Practice (CMPCP) established the PSN as an inclusive and cohesive community of performance studies specialists and other interested parties to promote musical and musicological debate, and to enable the development of new and more diverse research activity. The first three international conferences at the University of Cambridge (in July 2011, April 2013 and July 2014) laid the foundation for dialogue and cross-disciplinary engagement which will be further developed at the fourth international conference to be held at Bath Spa University, Newton Park campus, from 14 to 17 July 2016.

The Performance Studies Network maintains the online PSN Resource Guide and hosts the email forum PERF-STUD-NET, where details will be posted approximately twelve months before the conference.

For any additional information, please contact:

e-mail: a.bayley@bathspa.ac.uk
tel: +44 (0)1225 876182

Amanda Bayley
Professor of Music
Bath Spa University
Newton Park
Bath
BA2 9BN
UK

Musical biography: National ideology, Narrative technique, and the Nature of myth

9–11 April 2015, Institute of Musical Research, University of London, UK

While musical biography has recently received scholarly attention through an array of insightful research, the sheer breadth of possibilities for the study of biography (and biographies) in relation to music means that the broad field remains rich in untapped investigative potential. This conference will provide a forum for consolidated critical discussion on both the content of musical biography (national trends and ideologies; myths and mythology) and its form (narrative technique and meaning). It will aim to open up interdisciplinary avenues of enquiry across a wide range of subjects and time periods, in the domains of classical music, popular music, and ethnomusicology alike.

In lieu of a single keynote speaker, a series of roundtables with invited speakers is planned, including one on the writing of contemporary musical biographies and another on writing the lives of music critics. Further details will be circulated in due course.

Call for Papers

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect of musical biography that intersects with the conference theme, including (although not limited to) the following broad areas whether singly or in combination:

1. National ideology
a) Musical biography as national celebration
b) National trends in the writing of musical biography
c) Competing portrayals of the same subject
d) Musical biography as reception history

2. Narrative technique
a) The role of narrative in the creation of meaning in musical biography
b) Musical biography as a literary genre
c) Popular versus scholarly biographies
d) Aspects of the relationships between biographer, subject, and reader

3. The nature of myth
a) The creation, perpetuation, and refutation of mythologies
b) Musical biography as hagiography
c) Constructions of greatness, genius, and virtuosity through biography

Proposal for panels (4 speakers over 2 hours) are also encouraged.

Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and should be e-mailed by 12 January 2015 to Dr Paul Watt, paul.watt@monash.edu and Dr Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk.

Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 31 January 2015.

Queries: Paul Watt, paul.watt@monash.edu or Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

The conference is part-funded by the Australian Research Council and the Monash University Research Accelerator Program, and is supported by the University of Surrey.

Organized Time. Fifteenth Annual Congress of the Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie (GMTH)

October 1–4, 2015, Universität der Künste Berlin und Hochschule für Musik “Hanns Eisler”

Coinciding with the 25th anniversary of German reunification, the fifteenth Annual Congress of the Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie will deal with the temporal dimension of music and music theory. The structuring of musical time occurs on all hierarchical levels. It is a fundamental aspect of music perception; furthermore, it relates to musical compositions as well as to theories and conceptions of music in historical contexts. The complex relationships among compositional history, history of music theory, and cultural/social history are an object of music-theoretical reflection, whereby the significance of historicity itself is subjected to historical change. Dealing with a multiplicity of time levels characterizes musical life and teaching. The practices, concepts, and theories of different time periods thereby come into relationship with the present.

The three sections of the congress are devoted to the overall topic “Organized Time.“

Section 1: Revolution and evolution in music
Change can happen suddenly and radically while discarding the past, or it can happen gradually while preserving it. Looking back on characteristic innovations leads to the organization of music-historical time into epochs and to the classification of works as anachronistic or “unmodern.“ The history of music theory has also experienced gradual developments as well as sudden Copernican shifts.

Possible topics:
– Music and music theory during and after the bipartition of Germany
– Societal upheavals and their mirroring in music
– Radical evolution, peaceful revolution?
– Unsuccessful revolutions and “dead ends“
– Different conceptualizations of emulation and reference

Section 2: Rhythm, Meter, Form
The organizing of time in music is a music-theoretical subject that bears on all stages of training, from elementary instruction to the individual analysis of musical works. Whereas the teaching of form—and thus the teaching of musically organized time on higher hierarchical levels—is widely valued, rhythm and meter receive less attention.

Possible topics:
– Interdisciplinary implications of rhythm as a concept
– Rhythmic notation: history and new challenges
– Is there such a thing as unorganized musical time?
– Psychological representations of temporal structure in music.

Section 3: The simultaneity of the non-simultaneous (Die Gleichzeitigkeit des Ungleichzeitigen)
Music theory and musical practice always occur on multiple historical time levels. This “simultaneity of the non-simultaneous“ is characteristic of contemporary musical culture. The attempt to analyze works with the terminology of the era in which they were composed, as well as historically informed performance practice, attests to the desire to synchronize time levels.

Possible topics:
– Historically informed performance practice and its relationship to new music
– Historical approaches in music theory teaching
– Music theories in teaching and their historical context

Section 4: Free section

Formats

• Proposals for papers related to the general conference topic or free papers. The duration of the papers is 20 minutes.
• Proposals for workshops related to the general conference topic or to a free topic. Please indicate the proposed length of the workshop (up to 2 hours) and working methods.
• Proposals for themed sessions with a number of individual papers (duration of the whole session up to 2 hours). Please submit the proposals for the individual papers together with an explanatory text for the whole session.
• Proposals for book presentations. Please submit the exact title of the book and a short abstract. If possible we ask you to also submit a copy of the book.

The length of proposals for individual papers, workshops and book presentations must not exceed 350 words (plus bibliography). For proposals for themed sessions the limit applies to each individual paper as well as to the explaining text for the whole session.

Please submit your proposal (individual papers and workshops) by May 15th 2015 on the website of the GMTH:

http://www.gmth.de/veranstaltungen/jahreskongress/beitragsanmeldung.aspx

Section 2: Rhythm, Meter, Form
The organizing of time in music is a music-theoretical subject that bears on all stages of training, from elementary instruction to the individual analysis of musical works. Whereas the teaching of form—and thus the teaching of musically organized time on higher hierarchical levels—is widely valued, rhythm and meter receive less attention.

Possible topics:
– Interdisciplinary implications of rhythm as a concept
– Rhythmic notation: history and new challenges
– Is there such a thing as unorganized musical time?
– Psychological representations of temporal structure in music.
Section 3: The simultaneity of the non-simultaneous (Die Gleichzeitigkeit des Ungleichzeitigen)
Music theory and musical practice always occur on multiple historical time levels. This “simultaneity of the non-simultaneous“ is characteristic of contemporary musical culture. The attempt to analyze works with the terminology of the era in which they were composed, as well as historically informed performance practice, attests to the desire to synchronize time levels.

Possible topics:
– Historically informed performance practice and its relationship to new music
– Historical approaches in music theory teaching
– Music theories in teaching and their historical context

Section 4: Free section

Formats

• Proposals for papers related to the general conference topic or free papers. The duration of the papers is 20 minutes.
• Proposals for workshops related to the general conference topic or to a free topic. Please indicate the proposed length of the workshop (up to 2 hours) and working methods.
• Proposals for themed sessions with a number of individual papers (duration of the whole session up to 2 hours). Please submit the proposals for the individual papers together with an explanatory text for the whole session.
• Proposals for book presentations. Please submit the exact title of the book and a short abstract. If possible we ask you to also submit a copy of the book.

The length of proposals for individual papers, workshops and book presentations must not exceed 350 words (plus bibliography). For proposals for themed sessions the limit applies to each individual paper as well as to the explaining text for the whole session.

Please submit your proposal (individual papers and workshops) by May 15th 2015 on the website of the GMTH:

http://www.gmth.de/veranstaltungen/jahreskongress/beitragsanmeldung.aspx

Musical Dialogues: 38th National Conference of the Musicological Society of Australia

Call for Papers

Musical Dialogues: 38th National Conference of the Musicological Society of Australia

Deadline: 1 April 2015

Conference Dates: 1-4 October 2015

Venue: Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, Australia

Website: http://music.sydney.edu.au/research/research-activities/musicological-society-australia-msa-conference-2015/

 

In 2015, the year of its centenary, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music is delighted to host the annual conference of the Musicological Society of Australia. The conference invites participants to consider how the idea of ‘dialogue’ is relevant to their musical research interests. Whether conceived of in terms of the relationship between a creator and her audience, between a work and its historical antecedents, between different music cultures, or between performance and research, the notion that art involves dialogue of some kind is commonplace. Indeed, in the globalised world in which we live, dialogue between different musical traditions, different traditions of thought and different methodological approaches actively works to reshape the ways in which we both create and understand music and has given rise to recent calls for relational musicology.

 

Plenary Speakers

We are pleased to announce that two of the plenary speakers are already confirmed. They are Gary Tomlinson (John Hay Whitney Professor of Music & the Humanities, Yale University), and Neal Peres Da Costa (Associate Professor, Historical Performance, Sydney Conservatorium of Music).

 

Conference Theme

The theme “Musical Dialogues” seeks to engage with and showcase a wide breadth of scholarly expertise. This might involve a consideration of the way dialogue takes place in musical collaborations, performer-composer interactions, or the critical and hermeneutic discourse that has sprung up around many types of music. Participants might also consider exploring dialogues across history (not forgetting that the present changes the past as much as the past influences the present) or how a composer, work, or practice can be understood as a response to past phenomena, be they musical, cultural or social. Other types of dialogue for consideration might be those that take place between different traditions that co-exist within the same geographical space: settler societies such as Australia have a rich heritage of such cross-cultural interactions.

 

We particularly welcome papers addressing the following topics, though these are only suggestions and should not constrain authors.

  • Australian music: intercultural and intra-cultural exchanges
  • Performance as dialogue (with the composer/work/audience)
  • Temporal intersections: music of the past in the present; new musics in the context of their pasts
  • Global musical dialogues
  • Musical institutions as they engage with their social contexts
  • Discourses in music theory and historiography
  • Popular music as social discourse
  • Jazz scenes, communities and practices
  • Sound and image: dialogues between music and the visual – iconography, film, gaming

Free papers are also welcome.

 

Guidelines for Applicants

Scholars are invited to submit 250-word abstracts for individual presentations related to the conference sub-topics listed above or in the category of “free paper” to the following email address kathleen.nelson@sydney.edu.au. All submissions must be received by 1 April 2015 and will be acknowledged with a receipt to sender. The conference format will provide each successful applicant with 20-minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for Q&A. Applicants will be informed of acceptance by 29 April 2015.

 

The planning committee will also accept proposals for panel sessions related to the conference theme. Proposals for panel sessions should be 250-words in length, include a full list of panel members and be submitted as per the guidelines outlined above.

 

Special Events

A variety of performances will be held during the conference. A highlight will be a new Noh (shinsaku Nô) play in English by Allan Marett to be presented by members of The Oppenheimer Noh Project during the conference. Entitled “Oppenheimer,” the play focuses on the development and use of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945. Conference registrants will be offered tickets to this event at a specially discounted price.

 

Planning Committee

Linda Barwick, Christopher Coady, David Larkin, Alan Maddox and Kathleen Nelson

 

For further information please contact Christopher Coady (christopher.coady@sydney.edu.au) or Kathleen Nelson (kathleen.nelson@sydney.edu.au).

 

The «théâtre musical léger» in Europe: From the Operetta to the Music-hall

http://www.luigiboccherini.org/operetta.html

Organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

5-7 October 2015

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and the Palazzetto Bru Zane of Venice is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «The théâtre musical léger in Europe: From the Operetta to the Music-hall», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from Monday 5 until Wednesday 7 October 2015.

During the second half of the nineteenth century, the ‘official’ European performance venues were flanked by cabarets, music-halls and private spaces that welcomed new musical and theatrical genres. In Europe often miscellaneous venues hosted performances normally intended for the middle class.

In this scenario, the ‘operetta’ had a leading role. The term usually indicates different kinds of music theatre, which alternate singing and spoken language, such as opéra-bouffe, comédie musicale, music-hall performances (Madame Thérésa, Yvette Guilbert and Aristide Bruant in particular), revues (which then developed into the Italian rivista) and so forth, sometimes including ill-defined genres. Starting from the Second Empire, ‘operetta’, through a series of changes, was to arrive at the Broadway musical, often incorrectly called ‘American operetta’.

All the aforementioned varieties of entertainment have been explored in a few isolated studies, and have not received comprehensive scholarly exploration.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are welcome:

  • The genres of the théâtre musical léger: operetta, revue, caf’conc’, music-hall, chanson réaliste and so forth.
  • Musical performing venues (production system, legislation, censorship, etc.)
  • Repertoire
  • The composers of the théâtre musical léger (Hervé, Offenbach, Gilbert & Sullivan, Lecocq, R. Hahn, Varney, Audran, Planquette, Lehár, Scotto, Sidney Jones, Leoncavallo, Lombardo-Ranzato and so forth)
  • Staging and mise-en-scène
  • Exoticism as scenic and sociological component
  • Entertainment system in the European countries

 Programme Committee:

  • Olivier Bara (Université Lyon2)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane, Venice)
  • Lorenzo Frassà (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Michela Niccolai, Conference director (Bibliothèque Historique de la Ville de Paris – ART)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Susan Rutherford (University of Manchester)
  • Olivier Bara (Université Lyon2)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography. All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 10 May 2015*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2015, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Roberto Illiano, conferences@luigiboccherini.org

http://www.luigiboccherini.org/operetta.html

Music and Mobilities

Call for Papers

Joint Study Day of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology and the Royal Musical Association, Faculty of Music, University of Oxford, Friday 15 May 2015

Including an invited paper by Laura Tunbridge (University of Oxford), this second annual BFE/RMA Study Day seeks to bring together researchers to engage in interdisciplinary discussions about the relationship between music and mobilities. In the recently published Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies (2014), Jason Stanyek and Sumanth Gopinath observe that scholars of mobility have hitherto neglected music and sound: ‘mobility studies is, by and large, silent’. The Handbook is a pioneering attempt to ‘sonify’ the field, and the authors call for ‘scholars of mobility to take music and sound much more seriously’.

A response to, and an echo of, their call, this Study Day seeks to encourage a dialogue between mobility studies and the study of music and sound. What can mobility studies learn from music scholarship, and, conversely, how can ideas from mobility studies help us better understand musical forms and practices? How can scholars of music and sound develop, refine and problematize the concept of mobility? How might we conceptualize diverse and alternative musical ‘mobilities’?

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers that offer new insights into the issues surrounding music and mobilities, and which develop these discussions across different historical periods, geographic areas and academic disciplines. Papers will be followed by 10 minutes of questions and discussion. We would particularly welcome submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.

Themes that papers may address include, but are not limited to:

  • Mobile music and sound: styles, genres, repertoires, instruments
  • Mobile musicians: migration, travel, transport
  • Mobile audiences/listeners and mobile listening devices
  • Music, mobility, and temporality
  • Music, mobility, and geography: space, place, environment
  • Music, mobility, and (im)materiality
  • Music and (im)mobility; the body, health, and wellbeing
  • The politics and ethics of mobile music and sound
  • Mobile music before the twentieth century

Titles and abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to musicandmobilities@gmail.com by 6 March 2015. Please include name, affiliation, email address and AV requirements on a separate cover sheet. The Committee aims to notify applicants of the outcome by 20 March 2015.

The programme for the Study Day and details of registration will be announced on the website in due course: http://musicandmobilities.wordpress.com.

Programme Committee: Lyndsey Hoh (University of Oxford; BFE Student Liaison Officer), Peter Atkinson (University of Birmingham; RMA Student Representative), and Stephen Millar (Queen’s University Belfast; RMA Student Committee Member).

If you have any further queries, please contact the programme committee by emailing musicandmobilities@gmail.com.