Sound Studies: Art, Experience, Politics

“Sound Studies: Art, Experience, Politics”

July 8-10th 2015 – University of Cambridge

CFP Deadline: March 15th 2015

Sound Studies: Art, Experience, Politics is a three-day conference featuring leading researchers and artists in the field. The conference will include presentations by leading academics, as well as a sound art installation by an artist in residence, and an evening Sound Art and Criticism Salon.
The conceptual foundations of this conference are that sound is a vast assemblage of multisensory experiences and multivalent conceptualisations, and that sound is at once embodied, social and political. Sound Studies: Art, Experience, Politics invites researchers to consider not only the relationship between sound and broader sensory perception but also the social, political and economic implications of sound.

Conference sessions will include papers on:
Gendered Sounds
Sound, Conflict & War
Urban Phonography
Sound, Embodiment & the Multisensory

Sound Studies: Art, Experience, Politics aims to draw attention to the international growth of sound studies, and to emphasise the innovative and potentially subversive nature of research that steps outside of the norms of academic investigation into visual and textual materials.
The conference concludes with a plenary by Steven Connor, Grace 2 Professor of English, University of Cambridge.

We are seeking contributions in the form of academic papers, sound art, and an artist residency. Information can be found at the URL:
Call for Academic Papers – www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/assets/general/Sound@Cam_-Call_for_Academic_Papers.pdf
Call for Sound art and Criticism Salon – www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/assets/general/Sound@Cam-Call_for_Sound_Art_and_Criticism_Salon.pdf
Call for Artist in Residence – www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/assets/general/Sound@Cam-_Call_for_Artist_in_Residence.pdf
All proposals should be emailed to soundatcambridge@gmail.com by March 15th 2015.

Conveners:
Ely Rosenblum (Cambridge, Faculty of Music)
Anija Dokter (Cambridge, Faculty of Music)
Professor Steven Connor (Cambridge, Department of English)

Links:
www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/25663
www.facebook.com/soundatcam
twitter.com/soundatcam

German Song Onstage, 1770-1914

German Song Onstage 1770-1914
12-14 February 2016, Royal College of Music London

CALL FOR PAPERS
Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in the public musical concert as an artistic, cultural and social phenomenon. The purpose of this conference is to explore the role a largely private genre – German song– played within these public events. Concert programmes are littered with cryptic mentions of ‘Lied’ or ‘Gesang’, and although the specific songs are rarely listed, song seems to have played a small but essential role in the makeup of public concerts alongside the more obvious symphonies, concerti, overtures and even arias. Furthermore, as William Weber has argued, it was the inclusion of song which upset the eighteenth-century hierarchies of concert genres, leading to a change in concert programming over the century. Alongside this was the gradual emergence of the practice of singing complete song cycles beginning in the 1850s, and the even later concept of the dedicated song recital.
We invite researchers to submit proposals exploring the following questions:
– What function did German song have within the public concert and how did this shift during the century?
– Which venues and cities both inside and outside the Austro-German realm were particularly significant in the emergence of German song as a recital-worthy genre?
– Who were the singers of German song both inside and outside the Austro-German realm, and what role did song play within their wider repertoires?
– How did the notion of song accompaniment emerge, and how did multifaceted musicians like Liszt, Clara Schumann, or Brahms respond to this work?
– How was German song in concert received by critics and the public?
– How did performers approach programming strategies in concerts and how did this evolve?

Keynote speaker: Professor Susan Youens (University of Notre Dame)

We welcome abstracts in English and German of no more than 250 words for
– Paper presentations (max. length 20 minutes)
– Panel presentations (maximum length 1.5 hours including questions): please submit a general abstract of 250 words and individual abstracts of 250 words for each named speaker.
– Lecture-recitals (maximum length 40 minutes)
All abstracts should be accompanied by 250-word biographies of all participants.

A special feature of the weekend is the reproduction of three historical concerts by senior students at the Royal College of Music. These concerts will be open to the public and will take place in the College’s Parry Rooms, Britten Theatre and Concert Hall. All prospective presenters are therefore strongly encouraged to propose a concert programme of particular historical significance, such as the first performance of a major cycle, or a ‘pedagogical’ concert, or a miscellaneous programme in which German song plays a substantial role. Concert proposals should include the following where possible:
– The date, time (if possible), venue, and performers of the concert
– The complete programme of music performed
– The original programme leaflet
– A 250-word rationale for proposing the concert
Concert proposals will be evaluated jointly by the committee panel and the Artistic Planning Group of the Royal College of Music.

Abstracts, biographies and concert proposals should be sent to natasha.loges@rcm.ac.uk by 29 May 2015. Presenters will be advised as to their acceptance or otherwise by 29 June 2015. Following the conference, selected presentations will be published in an edited volume surveying the history of German song onstage, and presenters may wish to keep this in mind.

Natasha Loges, Royal College of Music
Laura Tunbridge, Oxford University

This event will take place in collaboration with the German Historical Institute, London.

The Serenata and the Festa Teatrale in 18th Century Europe

Call for Papers
INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM
The Serenata and the Festa Teatrale in 18th Century Europe

Queluz National Palace, Portugal (June 26-27th, 2015)
Organized by
Centro de Estudos Musicais Setecentistas de Portugal

Scientific Committee:
Manuel Carlos de Brito (Portugal), Paologiovanni Maione (Italy), Annarita Colturato (Italy), Cristina Fernandes (Portugal), Iskrena Yordanova (Bulgaria)

Key-speakers:
Andreia Sommer-Mathis (Austria), Annarita Colturato (Italy)

The CEMSP is organizing, from 26 to 27 June 2015, an International Colloquium at the National Palace of Queluz, dedicated to the Serenata and the Festa teatrale at the courts of Europe in the 18th century.
Investigating the distinctive character and contexts of the Festa teatrale and the Serenata at a time when musical theatre was an integral part of the ceremonial of the court and was a privileged ritual of repraesentatio maiestatis, implies an approach to these works full of metaphors and symbolic allusions that takes into account the multiplicity of aspects that involve the context of celebration and the choice of themes, its textual and musical structure, the dramaturgical forms, the vocal and instrumental ensembles, and the various options with regard to the stage apparatus and performance practices.
With this Colloquium, the CEMSP aims to encourage dialogue concerning the production and circulation of the Serenata, one of the principal musical genres performed at the Palace of Queluz during the 18th century, and to focus attention on the Portuguese contribution to the European musical circuit of the time.

The official languages of the conference are Portuguese, English and Italian.

Individual Papers are limited to 20 min. Single-topic panels involving joint presentations by three of four authors may also be considered (max. length: 1h30min). Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short bio (150 words max.) in Word format.

E-mail: cemsp@sapo.pt
All proposals should be submitted no later than March 31st 2015. Please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and affiliation.

The Scientific Committee will make the final decision on the abstracts by April 10th 2015 and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter.

Sixth International Symposium on Music /Sonic Art: Practices and Theories

MuSA 2014 – Karlsruhe (IMWI)
25-28 June, 2015

Hochschule für Musik, Karlsruhe –
Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Musikinformatik (IMWI)
Am Schloss Gottesaue 7, 76131 Karlsruhe

CALL FOR PAPERS:

We are pleased to announce the Sixth International Symposium on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories (MuSA 2015), an interdisciplinary event to be held in Karlsruhe, Germany at the Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Musikinformatik (IMWI) (http://www.hit-karlsruhe.de/hfm-ka/imm/). MuSA 2015 is also supported by Middlesex University, London. The dates of the Symposium are 25-28 June, 2015.

Proposals for sessions and individual papers for the Sixth International Symposium on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories are invited from academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students. Presentation formats include academic research papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion); reports on practice-based/artistic research or educational programmes (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion); and workshops, panel sessions, lecture-demonstrations (30 minutes + 15 minutes for discussion). The Symposium committee encourages presentations in which practice forms an integral part of the research. All proposals will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed. The Symposium language will be English. Previous themes and topics can be seen at: musa2012.zilmusic.com, musa2013.zilmusic.com, musa2014.zilmusic.com


THEME AND TOPICS:

The principal aim of MuSA 2015 is to advance interdisciplinary investigations in – as well as between – music and sonic art.  Following the success of MuSA2014 in opening up interdisciplinary debate on the role of embodied approaches, MuSA2015 will continue to probe this research area through the Symposium theme: Exploring embodiment in music and sonic art.

We invite submissions on the following, and other related topics:

  • Body movement and emergence of meaning;
  • Embodied approaches to creativity;
  • Kinematics and haptics as background for music and sonic art research;
  • Gesture and expression;
  • Methods for embodied analysis;
  • Phenomenology of the performing body;
  • The body within socio-cultural contexts of music and sonic art;
  • Pedagogical contexts for embodied approaches to music and sonic art;
  • The body in interpersonal sound-based communication;
  • Ecological, biological, neuroscientific and evolutionary approaches to embodiment;
  • Historical roots of embodied approaches in theory and practice;
  • Technology and embodiment;
  • Artificial intelligence and embodiment;
  • Critical discourses of embodiment in practice and research;
  • Embodied aesthetics;
  • Embodiment in collaborative research;

Other topics that are in line with the Symposium’s broad aim of promoting interdisciplinary research within and across Music and Sonic Art will also be considered.

In addition, MuSA 2015 will devote one day to the specific theme: Re-thinking the Musical Instrument

Within the thriving discipline of musical performance studies, there is a general tendency to speak of ‘the performer’ as an abstract category without taking into account the kind of musical instrument that mediates the act of music making and music as a temporally emergent, sounding phenomenon. In reality, different kinds of musical instruments involve different expressive means (and at times different expressive/artistic aims), engender different phenomenologies of performance making, and generate different kinds of performer identities. The nature of the embodied interaction with different instruments in composition and performance, and the expressive and communicative meanings that emerge as a result of such interaction constitute a largely unexplored research territory.

Some of the topics that will be explored include:

    • The acoustical, musical, cultural, symbolic, and ritualistic qualities of musical instruments and the relationships between these (theoretically) distinct kinds of qualities;
    • The discourses that exist in relation to musical instruments in different genres, styles and traditions;
    • The gestural affordances and ergonomic principles of musical instruments and the musical meanings that emerge as a result of these affordances and principles;
    • Performers, improvisers and their instruments: phenomenologies of music making in the context of particular kinds of musical instruments;
    • Composer and instruments: the material, acoustical and expressive qualities of instruments and their relationship to musical languages composers create;
    • Relationships between creativity in performance, nature of musical interpretation and musical instruments;
    • The role of the musical instrument in the creation of musical identities;

 

 

We invite proposals on any research area related to the nature and use of western acoustical instruments, traditional ethnic instruments and digital/virtual instruments.


ABSTRACT FORMAT:

Please submit an abstract of approximately 250-300 words as an e-mail attachment to musa2015@btinternet.com

Please specify whether you wish your abstract to be considered for the one-day ‘Re-thinking the musical instrument’ event.

As contributions will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed, please do not include information that might facilitate identification from the abstract. In addition, please include separately the name(s) of the author(s), institutional affiliation (if any) and short biography (approximately 100 words). Deadline for the receipt of abstracts is Monday, 27 April 2015. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 8 May.

 

REGISTRATION:

The Symposium fees are: €120 for delegates (day rate: €40), €100 for presenters (day rate: €35), and €60 for students and others who qualify for concessions (day rate: €20).

If additional information is required please do not hesitate to contact Prof. Dr. Mine Doğantan-Dack or any member of the symposium committee:

Prof. Dr. Mine Doğantan-Dack (University of Oxford) – mine.dogantan-dack@music.oxford.ac.uk

Prof. Dr. Thomas A. Troge (IMWI, Karlsruhe) – troge@hfm.eu

Prof. Dr. Denis Lorrain (IMWI, Karlsruhe) – lorrain@hfm.eu

Prof. Dr. Paulo Ferreira-Lopes (Universita Cattolica Porto/ HfM-Karlsruhe) – pfl@hfm.eu

Prof. Miroslav Spasov (Keele University, Music Department) – m.spasov@keele.ac.uk

Dr. John Dack (Middlesex University, Art & Design / Science & Technology) – j.dack@mdx.ac.uk

Timothy P. Schmele (IMWI, Karlsruhe)  – t.schme@gmail.com


Administrative support: Gundi Rössler (IMWI, Karlsruhe) – roessler@hfm.eu

Musiconis Conference

image001Call for papers, Musiconis Conference, 11, 12, and 13 June 2015 in Chartres

The visual representation of speech, sound, and noise from Antiquity to the Renaissance

The Musiconis conference will take into account the conveyance of sound through all types of visual representation, whether figurative, mathematical, graphic, calligraphic, epigraphic, coloristic, ornamental, compositional, substantive or other means. The conference presentations may address all visual media, from monumental art to objects and manuscript illumination.

To propose a paper, send an abstract of no more than 3000 characters to Frédéric Billiet and Isabelle Marchesin by January 31, 2015.

Comité scientifique/Program committee

Dorothea Baumann (Université de Zürich)
Frédéric Billiet (IReMus-Université Paris-Sorbonne)
Susan Boynton (Columbia University)
Florence Gétreau (IReMus-CNRS)
Nicoletta Guidobaldi (Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna)
Isabelle Marchesin (INHA-Université de Poitiers)
Claude Montacié (STIH-Université Paris-Sorbonne)
Christophe Vendries (Université Rennes 2-LAHM)

Comité d’organisation/Conference organizers
Sébastien Biay (CESCM-Université de Poitiers)
Frédéric Billiet
Isabelle Marchesin

Xavier Fresquet

Musical Instruments in Science and History

The Galpin Society in association with The Institute of Acoustics announces

Musical Instruments in Science and History

Sunday 27th – Wednesday 30th September 2015, Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, UK

in association with

The Sir Nicholas Shackleton Memorial Concert and The Christopher Hogwood Memorial Recital

CALL FOR PAPERS

Papers of 20 minutes duration are invited for this major conference on all aspects of musical instruments. Subjects include but are not limited to Woodwind instruments, Keyboard instruments, instruments in early music, Musical instrument Acoustics and Musical instrument

It is hoped that conference participants and speakers will include instrument makers and performers as well as professional and independent scholars. Tuesday 29th September will have a focus on the Acoustics of Musical Instruments, in association with the Institute of Acoustics.

Every prospective speaker should send the title of their presentation, and an abstract (maximum 200 words), to Technical Liaison (email); these must be received before the end of March 2015.

Presentations are to be given in English. Speakers intending to use PowerPoint are requested to bring their presentation on a memory stick and to ensure that it is PC compatible.

After selection by the organisers, speakers will be contacted by the end of May 2015.

We are pleased to announce that papers will be considered for a debut paper award upon application.

PERFORMA 2015 – Conference on Musical Performance

PERFORMA 2015 – Conference on Musical Performance

Call for papers

The University of Aveiro and INET-MD (Institute of Ethnomusicology – Centre for Music and Dance Studies) and the Brazilian Association of Musical Performance (ABRAPEM) will host PERFORMA’15, a conference on performance studies, from June the 11th until June the 13th, 2015 in Aveiro, Portugal. The organization is with the collaboration of the Graduate Studies Program of the Instituto de Artes of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The keynote-speakers will be Prof. Marcel Cobussen, from the Leiden University in the Netherlands (and from Orpheus Institute in Ghent, Belgium), and Prof. Tia DeNora, from the University of Exeter, UK. This conference seeks to generate and present new perspectives on musical performance through interdisciplinary dialogue. The main theme for the 2015 edition will be performance practice as research with three specific research topics:
a) Musical performance as artistic research. The choice of this topic is intended to provide opportunities to discuss and reflect upon submissions where the research results depend, to a considerable extent, on the appreciation/evaluation of artistic products – of their embodied qualities and knowledge. Lecture-Recitals will be the natural format for such submissions.
b) Voice and vocality in performance: presence, emotion, meaning. In the academic tradition the voice was hidden for decades behind the musical text or the word that it expresses. The relegation of voice into the background may be due to the rationalization process, within its scientific study, which began with Max Weber, in the late nineteenth century. We invite the submission of proposals that explore issues around voice notions and vocality.
c) Utopias in performance. Musical performances build specific modes of being-in-the-world, expressing ideals, transmitting values, ritualizing behaviours, and, sometimes, experiencing new social roles on stage and establishing relations that are not describable in other contexts. We invite the submission of proposals to discuss these dimensions of performance.

Submissions are now invited; we particularly welcome submissions on these three topics but other approaches are also acceptable if the focus is on musical performance.

We welcome abstracts of a maximum of 350 words for:
• Paper presentations (max. length 20 minutes);
• Pre-formed Panels: Please submit abstracts with each named speaker and their institutional affiliation. Panels should last 1 hour and 30 minutes;
• Lecture-Recitals: should last from 30 to 45 minutes. Proposals submissions should specify exact length and be accompanied by a short curriculum of the presenter;
• Posters.

We do not require a pre-defined proposal format, but we recommend that submissions include information on context, aims, methods and results.

The submission deadline is February 28th, 2015.
Abstracts should be sent to deca-performa@ua.pt.

General enquiries (registration, travel, lodging) should be sent to <jcorreia@ua.pt>. Residents in Brazil should send their enquiries – namely registration – to <catarina@catarinadomenici.com>

We also welcome proposals for 20-minutes long performances, which will be presented in a shared recital format. Applicants are invited to submit video/audio recordings of the proposed performance. The video should be posted on Youtube (please note that you can select private, unlisted or public viewing) and a link to the video should be sent to <jcorreia@ua.pt>. Please note that percussion equipment will not be provided.
Abstracts and performance proposals will be reviewed by a panel, and presenters will be advised as to their acceptance or otherwise by mid-March, 2015. The deadline for the submission of proceedings articles (accepted authors only) is April 30th, 2015.

Organized Time. Fifteenth Annual Congress of the Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie (GMTH)

October 1–4, 2015, Universität der Künste Berlin und Hochschule für Musik “Hanns Eisler”

Coinciding with the 25th anniversary of German reunification, the fifteenth Annual Congress of the Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie will deal with the temporal dimension of music and music theory. The structuring of musical time occurs on all hierarchical levels. It is a fundamental aspect of music perception; furthermore, it relates to musical compositions as well as to theories and conceptions of music in historical contexts. The complex relationships among compositional history, history of music theory, and cultural/social history are an object of music-theoretical reflection, whereby the significance of historicity itself is subjected to historical change. Dealing with a multiplicity of time levels characterizes musical life and teaching. The practices, concepts, and theories of different time periods thereby come into relationship with the present.

The three sections of the congress are devoted to the overall topic “Organized Time.“

Section 1: Revolution and evolution in music
Change can happen suddenly and radically while discarding the past, or it can happen gradually while preserving it. Looking back on characteristic innovations leads to the organization of music-historical time into epochs and to the classification of works as anachronistic or “unmodern.“ The history of music theory has also experienced gradual developments as well as sudden Copernican shifts.

Possible topics:
– Music and music theory during and after the bipartition of Germany
– Societal upheavals and their mirroring in music
– Radical evolution, peaceful revolution?
– Unsuccessful revolutions and “dead ends“
– Different conceptualizations of emulation and reference

Section 2: Rhythm, Meter, Form
The organizing of time in music is a music-theoretical subject that bears on all stages of training, from elementary instruction to the individual analysis of musical works. Whereas the teaching of form—and thus the teaching of musically organized time on higher hierarchical levels—is widely valued, rhythm and meter receive less attention.

Possible topics:
– Interdisciplinary implications of rhythm as a concept
– Rhythmic notation: history and new challenges
– Is there such a thing as unorganized musical time?
– Psychological representations of temporal structure in music.

Section 3: The simultaneity of the non-simultaneous (Die Gleichzeitigkeit des Ungleichzeitigen)
Music theory and musical practice always occur on multiple historical time levels. This “simultaneity of the non-simultaneous“ is characteristic of contemporary musical culture. The attempt to analyze works with the terminology of the era in which they were composed, as well as historically informed performance practice, attests to the desire to synchronize time levels.

Possible topics:
– Historically informed performance practice and its relationship to new music
– Historical approaches in music theory teaching
– Music theories in teaching and their historical context

Section 4: Free section

Formats

• Proposals for papers related to the general conference topic or free papers. The duration of the papers is 20 minutes.
• Proposals for workshops related to the general conference topic or to a free topic. Please indicate the proposed length of the workshop (up to 2 hours) and working methods.
• Proposals for themed sessions with a number of individual papers (duration of the whole session up to 2 hours). Please submit the proposals for the individual papers together with an explanatory text for the whole session.
• Proposals for book presentations. Please submit the exact title of the book and a short abstract. If possible we ask you to also submit a copy of the book.

The length of proposals for individual papers, workshops and book presentations must not exceed 350 words (plus bibliography). For proposals for themed sessions the limit applies to each individual paper as well as to the explaining text for the whole session.

Please submit your proposal (individual papers and workshops) by May 15th 2015 on the website of the GMTH:

http://www.gmth.de/veranstaltungen/jahreskongress/beitragsanmeldung.aspx

Section 2: Rhythm, Meter, Form
The organizing of time in music is a music-theoretical subject that bears on all stages of training, from elementary instruction to the individual analysis of musical works. Whereas the teaching of form—and thus the teaching of musically organized time on higher hierarchical levels—is widely valued, rhythm and meter receive less attention.

Possible topics:
– Interdisciplinary implications of rhythm as a concept
– Rhythmic notation: history and new challenges
– Is there such a thing as unorganized musical time?
– Psychological representations of temporal structure in music.
Section 3: The simultaneity of the non-simultaneous (Die Gleichzeitigkeit des Ungleichzeitigen)
Music theory and musical practice always occur on multiple historical time levels. This “simultaneity of the non-simultaneous“ is characteristic of contemporary musical culture. The attempt to analyze works with the terminology of the era in which they were composed, as well as historically informed performance practice, attests to the desire to synchronize time levels.

Possible topics:
– Historically informed performance practice and its relationship to new music
– Historical approaches in music theory teaching
– Music theories in teaching and their historical context

Section 4: Free section

Formats

• Proposals for papers related to the general conference topic or free papers. The duration of the papers is 20 minutes.
• Proposals for workshops related to the general conference topic or to a free topic. Please indicate the proposed length of the workshop (up to 2 hours) and working methods.
• Proposals for themed sessions with a number of individual papers (duration of the whole session up to 2 hours). Please submit the proposals for the individual papers together with an explanatory text for the whole session.
• Proposals for book presentations. Please submit the exact title of the book and a short abstract. If possible we ask you to also submit a copy of the book.

The length of proposals for individual papers, workshops and book presentations must not exceed 350 words (plus bibliography). For proposals for themed sessions the limit applies to each individual paper as well as to the explaining text for the whole session.

Please submit your proposal (individual papers and workshops) by May 15th 2015 on the website of the GMTH:

http://www.gmth.de/veranstaltungen/jahreskongress/beitragsanmeldung.aspx

Royal Musical Association Annual Conference 2015

The Royal Musical Association 2015 Annual Conference is scheduled from Wednesday 9 to Friday 11 September at the University of Birmingham. Contacts: For Birmingham Ben Earle (Conference Deputy Director) b.n.earle@bham.ac.uk; for RMA Warwick Edwards Warwick.Edwards@glasgow.ac.uk. For further details please click here. Please note the Call for Proposals has now closed. Full details and bookings open in March.