Networks of Keyboard Music c. 1600, focusing on Jan Sweelinck and Peter Philips

Networks of Keyboard Music c. 1600, focusing on Jan Sweelinck and Peter Philips

 

McGill University, Montreal, Canada, 11-13 February 2011

 

In this international symposium, we explore the nature of the conversation between Netherlands composer Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck and his English contemporary, Peter Philips, for whom the 2010-11 season marks the 450th anniversary of birth. Emphasis is placed on their keyboard music production.

 

In a series of performance events, lectures, masterclasses, and papers, connections between composers in the Netherlands and in England in the last quarter of the sixteenth century to the middle of the seventeenth century will also be examined. We want to make distinctions between local networks of influence (within the Netherlands and England, for example) and those that transcended political borders. Whilst Sweelinck remained all his life in Amsterdam, attracting students to study with him there, Philips, an English expatriate who eventually settled in the Catholic Netherlands, was notoriously peripatetic. Both were attracted to Italian vocal and keyboard music achievements, and each seemed eager to acknowledge the keyboard music of the other’s culture.

 

Papers are invited on keyboard networks in the early modern period.

 

Possible areas include:

·         Local keyboard music networks

·         Transnational keyboard music networks

·         Keyboard music and national style c.1600

·         Keyboard music performance practice c. 1600

·         Networks of musicians or artists in terms of style and influence

·         Lines of cultural exchange particularly related to keyboard music

·         Geographical movements of music and musicians

 

This is one of two conferences organised by McGill University and the University of Aberdeen to mark the anniversary of Peter Philips.

 

Proposals for papers should be sent to Dr Rachelle C.-Taylor (rachelle.taylor@mcgill.ca) by 31 August 2010, and should include an abstract of no longer than 250 words