Department of Music

Back Page

Freedom of Expression in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World (1350-1650)
Santa Barbara, February 2000


Freedom of Expression in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World
(1350-1650)

February 18-20, 2000
University of California-Santa Barbara

An Interdisciplinary Conference


Keynote speaker:  Constance Jordan
Chair of Early Modern Studies Program
Claremont Graduate University


The Renaissance Studies Program of the University of California, Santa
Barbara, invites paper and session proposals for an interdisciplinary
conference on "Freedom of Expression in the Late Medieval and Early Modern
World" to be held at the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center on the UCSB
Campus, February 18-20, 2000. 

"Freedom of Expression" is a conference exploring the strategic choices
individuals made in order to express themselves in late medieval and early
modern culture, and focusing upon the following issues:  How free was
expression in the period, and how might that freedom and its limitations
be characterized?  How did individuals and groups construct expression in
order to be heard?  What constructions of expression were acceptable, and
upon what basis were particular constructions chosen?  How was expression
constrained by larger events such as plague, war, and religious upheaval?
Was there such a thing as freedom of expression in the late medieval and
early modern world?  Many different media, such as musical composition and
performance, dancing, painting, dramatic arts, poetry, and religious and
legal testimony, may be explored.  Topics include, but are not limited to: 

* libel and slander	     * anonymity            * speaking in tongues
* gossip and rumor	     * censorship           * translation		
* religious expression       * heresy and recusancy * tale-telling	
* treasonous expression	     * issues of patronage  * plague and disease
* issues of gender in expression, and women's expression  * issues of race
* corporate vs. individual expression

Please send abstracts for twenty minute presentations 
by September 30, 1999 to: 
	      						      
Michael O'Connell
Department of English
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA  93106
USA
Phone:  +1-(805) 893-4022
Fax:    +1-(805) 893-4622
Email:  oconnell@humanitas.ucsb.edu