Department of Music

Back Page

Music: Concept, Writing and Performance
Copenhagen, November 2002


University of Copenhagen, Department of Music

INVITATION and CALL FOR PAPERS

Music: concept, writing and performance

A one-week course for PhD students

Copenhagen, 25th-29th November 2002


Different musical cultures, periods and artists create different groups of
relations between music as idea, music as writing and music as
performance. Current musicological research from otherwise extremely
diverse areas converges on a common interest in transformation processes
in the relation between the practices of writing and of performance.
Discussion of these topics raises fundamental musicological questions
concerning music's various forms of existence within cultures, including
conditions for the production, distribution and reception of music, the
conditions for its processes of delivery and tradition, and authority
relations. The PhD course Music: concept, writing and performance
thematicises this complex of problems in five specific areas, spanning the
sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The organisation of this course
is motivated by a desire to call attention to a common essential
problematic in theoretical work within diverse areas, and is addressed to
PhD students from musicology and students from related disciplines who are
researching music in interdisciplinary contexts and/or other art forms
which have a performance aspect.


Monday 25th November

(title to be agreed)

Speaker: Rob C. Wegman, Princeton University

Tuesday 26th November

Seventeenth-century opera manuscripts as a guide to performance:
Monteverdi's Ritorno d'Ulisse

Speaker: Professor Ellen Rosand, Yale University

Wednesday 27th November

Meanings of past, textuality and performativity in Jewish music in Europe

Speaker: Philipp V. Bohlman, University of Chicago

Thursday 28th November

"Weltanschauungsmusik": a cultural form of modernity

Speaker: Professor Hermann Danuser, Humboldt-Universitšt zu Berlin

Friday 29th November

Compositional inscription today: notation, performance, recording and
electronic processing

Speaker: Trevor Wishart, composer

The course centres around these lectures. There will also be opportunities
for PhD students to present their research-in-progress to the course's
participants, and discussions will be organised between smaller groups of
participants with closely related projects. The course's working language
is English.

PhD students (or equivalent) are invited to apply, with a short proposal
of the paper they plan to hold, by 15th September 2002, to: Jette
Barnholdt Hansen, juliana@hum.ku.dk

There is no fee for participating in the course, and the Department of
Music will be happy to provide letters of support for those applying for
travel funds from their own institutions.