Department of Music

Back Page

Reading Iberia: Iberian Studies in Theory and Practice
Birmingham, July 2003


READING IBERIA:
IBERIAN STUDIES IN THEORY AND PRACTICE
5th-6th July 2003, University of Birmingham

FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS



The rapid social, cultural and political changes in Spain and Portugal since the
1970s, coupled with the rise of theory and cultural studies in the last decades of
the twentieth century, mean that scholars working in the fields of Iberian studies
have seen their object of study and their methodologies scrutinised and
questioned. This conference will examine the implications that this time of rapid
change holds for British Hispanism. Our aim is to provide a dynamic platform for
discussion in light of the increasing fragmentation of both the object of study
and the methods of approaching it.

Keynote speakers include Professor Paul Julian Smith and Professor Chris Perriam

Discussion and exchange of views may include, but is not limited to, the following
questions:

*       What is Iberia and Iberian Studies?  How is Iberia re-imagined in the 
	British institution?  What role do Portugal and the autonomous regions
	play?

*       Identity, gender and sexuality - what impact have these issues had on 
	reading and discussing Iberian culture?

*       What is the place of cultural studies and literature in studying the 
	foreign language?  How is the canon changing?  What is the effect of
	changing syllabi?

*       Metanarratives of understanding Iberia.  How do we re-read the past? How
	do historical constructions of Iberia impact on our understanding of it 
	now?

*       What are the ethics of cross-cultural study?  How do we represent the 
	'Other' in research and teaching?

The aim of the conference is to promote discussion, with position papers and
workshops opening up the floor to debate.  Discussion will be informal whilst
providing a platform for serious exploration of the issues that affect Iberian
studies in theory and practice at the beginning of the twenty-first century. We
anticipate publication of selected proceedings.

We welcome 150-200 word abstracts for 20 minute papers, or proposals for workshop
sessions.  Please send abstracts and proposals, by 28th March 2003, to one of the
organisers:

Stuart Davis
Dept of Hispanic Studies
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK
e-mail: daviss@hhs.bham.ac.uk

Kirsty Hooper
The Queen's College
Oxford
OX1 4AW
UK
e-mail: kirsty.hooper@queens.ox.ac.uk