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Renaissance Society of America, Annual Meeting
New York, March 2004


New York 2004
Fiftieth Anniversary of the RSA
by Martin Elsky, Conference Co-Chair


I am pleased to update members about the RSA Conference of 2004, which will be
held in New York from Thursday, 25 March, to Saturday, 27 March, at the Grand
Hyatt Hotel.

Benjamin Ravid, the Bennett Lecturer, will speak on "Hebraica, Judaica, and the
Renaissance."

The conference coincides with a particularly joyous occasion, the fiftieth
anniversary of the RSA's founding.

We'll be celebrating the event in the Trends Panel, "Changing Models of
Renaissance Scholarship: A Fifty Year Retrospective." In "Spain, Spanish America,
and the Renaissance: Problems and Prospects," Richard Kagan will discuss how North
American scholars of the Renaissance in Spain and its American colonies have
changed the traditional view that Spain, having turned its back on most European
intellectual developments, had no Renaissance. In "Seeing Things," Rona Goffen
will describe how Italian art history, traditionally central to Renaissance
studies, but also one of the more conservative disciplines, has developed a new
paradigm of multidisciplinary study. Eugene Rice, a distinguished former president
of the RSA, will treat us to a fifty-year history of the organization.

As the host institution of the RSA, The Graduate School and University Center of
The City University of New York is planning a gallery exhibit and related
sessions, as well as an opening night reception.

We urge you to start thinking about organizing panels, which should be submitted
on the RSA website, www.rsa.org. We also of course welcome individual papers. As
always we will need members to volunteer to chair sessions. Let the RSA office
know your institutional position and your range of interests, and we will do our
best to match chair and panel.

We hope this will help members obtain funding to attend the conference. We look
forward to wide participation for an exciting conference in the city that never
sleeps.