Students at Royal Holloway,
University of London Royal Holloway,
University of London
 

Musica Baltica: University and Music in the Baltic Region
Musica Baltica: Universität und Musik im Ostseeraum

Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg
Institut für Kirchenmusik und Musikwissenschaft der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald
13.09.2006-16.09.2006



Deutsch

"University and Music in the Baltic Region"
"Musica Baltica: Universität und Musik im Ostseeraum"

For the occasion of the 550th anniversary of the foundation of the
University of Greifswald the Department of Church Music and Musicology
is organizing its 11th international musicological conference "Musica
Baltica" on the topic "University and Music". Since the conference in
1994 with a similar theme - "Academic Subject and Exercitium - Music
at the Universities in the Baltic Region" - resulted in a more cursory
overview, the topic will again be focussed upon in 2006. There are
quite a lot of venerable old universities in the Baltic region. The
Alma Mater Rostochiensis, the oldest academic institution in this
region, was already founded in 1419. Scandinavia looks back on 500
years of academic history with the Universities of Uppsala (founded in
1477) and Copenhagen (founded in 1479). Music as a theoretical subject
as well as in practice has found its place at the universities since
their beginnings.

The conference in Greifswald in 2006 however will be concerned not
only with the universities of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern
Times, but also those academic institutions within the Baltic region
that are of recent date but are also dedicated to musical education
and practice. In accordance with the state of research as summarized
by Emil Platen in his MGG-article "Universität und Musik", the
following main points will be discussed:

1. The setting up of Musicology as a subject of teaching and research
would not have been possible without the existence of universities.
Previously, musical education was mainly provided by the so-called
Latin (or Grammar) schools (especially in the Protestant northern and
north-eastern regions) and predominantly served musical practice since
the 16th century. However the "metamorphosis" of the older musical
director, who was interested in history, towards the "musically
interested historian and philologist" (Platen) in the 19th century
inevitably led to the institutionalizing of Musicology as an academic
discipline. This process has been by no means comprehensively
elucidated for the Baltic region even today. Not only the specific
conditions that resulted in the acceptance of Musicology as an
academic discipline and its admission into the universitas litterarum
would be worth examining, but also the question of the existence of
certain regional or local accents (historical, philological,
ethnological) within the subject. Referring to the field of "Musica
Baltica", detailed knowledge about possible patterns of orientation
within the Baltic region and furthermore about the imaginable
transference in case of education and research would be of particular
interest.

2. As universitas magistrorum et studiosorum the university is an
institutionally established society, that has been defined since the
beginning not only by its common interests in teaching and learning, but
 also by its numerous academic customs. In this context music is of
special importance, although the musical forms within academic life
(both sacred and ceremonial) are principally imaginable also outside
the university. For this reason it is not enough to inquire only
generally into the historical and contemporary forms of academic music
at the universities in the Baltic area. After all we know about the
existence of academic music teachers in Uppsala as well as in Helsinki
or Dorpat. Furthermore the investigations should regard the specific
peculiarities of university music. Are these limited to already
investigated phenomena such as the integration of trans-national
musical genres and forms into song or lute books or to the existence
of typical student songs (which can still be found even in Johannes
Brahms' Academic Festival Overture)? Moreover one could ask whether
university choirs, orchestras and musical directors nowadays still are
representatives of their academic institutions with a specific
"academic" repertoire, or do they only enrich the pool of local
musical institutions?

3. Musical education and practice at the universities is bound to
persons and offices. But this does not include the existence of
specific academic professions, because it seems as if musicians at
universities for centuries only worked on the side. How this was
actually organized has hardly been investigated yet. A comprehensive
examination of the musical life at universities in terms of social or
institutional history is still due. In this respect the conference in
Greifswald is intended to make at least first steps. Especially to
investigate the status of the academic musicians and their relations
to or their emancipation of the musicians engaged in local or church
services would be interesting.

4. At the latest since the conversion of the musical academies and
conservatories into colleges [of music] (in West Germany in the 1970s
and 1980s), that offer musicological studies at undergraduate and
postgraduate levels, the question about the relation between
university and college of music has to be answered. To what extent are
academic rules of teaching and research important within colleges of
music? Do they just belong to the "ghetto" of lessons in musical
history for prospective singers, instrumentalists and music teachers
which are usually eliminated at first if time or rooms are lacking?
Furthermore the often described benefit of the direct neighbourhood of
musicological research and musical practice has to be investigated. Is
this maybe the actual future of the relation between university and
music?

The previous musicological conferences in Greifswald on the main topic
"Musica Baltica" have shown the importance of case studies of the
concerned regions for elucidating the musical culture of the Baltic
region. Besides the written music, especially the musical life and the
social function of music and music playing is of a particular
interest. There has not been anything like "the music of the Baltic
region" or "the musical practice of the Baltic region". This seems to
be especially valid for the present. But nevertheless the Baltic
region was defined in former centuries for a long period by its
dominant Protestant religion as well as by the Baltic sea as a common
shipping route that encouraged the establishment of trading centres.
In consequence cultural transfers, the exchange of musicians and
music, the formation of similar musical professions and corresponding
structures within musical life were favoured. For this reason, social
and institutional history is an area of a special importance with
regard to musical life around the Baltic. The topic of the conference
"University and Music" has to be understood in this context. Only by
detailed knowledge about the inter-academic transfer of music,
musicians and of musical knowledge, about the usual intercultural
contacts at the universities and about the function of university
music for the institution itself as well as for the local and
interregional musical life, may the term "Musica Baltica" cease to be
merely a heuristic term and be filled with life.


Programme Wednesday, 13 September 15.00 Eröffnung: Musik, Grußworte 1. Zwischen musica theorica und musica practica 15.30 Werner Braun (Saarbrücken): Aspekte des Klingenden. Zur Thematik in Universitätsschriften zwischen 1600 und 1750 16.00 Rainer Bayreuther (Weimar/Jena): Musikausbildung zwischen 1550 und 1650 an der Artistenfakultät der Uni Jena 17.00 Gudrun Viergutz (Jyväskylä): Das Musikprogramm bei den Einweihungsfeierlichkeiten der Universität Turku im Jahre 1640 Thursday, 14 September 2. Beispiel Danzig: Vom Gymnasium Dantiscanum zur Akademia Muzyczna 9.00 Danuta Szlagowska (Danzig): Music for the Professors of Gymnasium Dantiscanum 9.30 Danuta Popinigis (Danzig): In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Rektor - Musik von Thomas Struthius 10.30 Jolanta Wozniak (Danzig): Festkantate von F. Th. Kniewel (1817) zur Feier der Vereinigung des Akademischen Gymnasiums mit der Marienschule in Danzig 11.00 Jerzy M. Michalak (Danzig): Die Musik am Danziger Gymnasium 1817-1914 11.30 Violetta Kostka (Danzig): Students^Ò performances of operas in the Academy of Music in Gdansk 3. Universitäres Musikleben und berufliche Karrieren 14.00 Klaus-Peter Koch (Bonn): Studentische Orgel- und Lautentabulaturen im Ostseeraum des 16./17. Jahrhunderts und ihre Bedeutung für die Vermittlung europäischen Repertoires 14.30 Felix Pourtov (Leipzig): Absolventen der deutschen Universitäten als Musikverleger in St. Petersburg im 18. Jahrhundert 15.30 Harald Lönnecker (Koblenz): ^ÄGoldenes Leben im Gesang!^Ó ^Ö Gründung und Entwicklung Akademischer Gesangvereine an den Universitäten des Ostseeraums im 19. Jahrhundert 16.00 Andreas Waczkat (Münster): Die ersten akademischen Musiklehrer des 19. Jahrhunderts an der Universität Rostock Friday, 15 September 9.00 Wladimir Gurewitsch (St. Petersburg): Die Universitätsmusik in St. Petersburg: Vergangenheit, Gegenwart, Zukunft 9.30 Geiu Rohtla (Tallin): Die Musikpflege und der Wirkungskreis eines Musiklehrers an der Kaiserlichen Universität in Dorpat/Tartu (1807-1893) 4. Frühe Musikwissenschaft im Ostseeraum 10.30 Karl Traugott Goldbach (Weimar): Die musiktheoretische Lehre der Naturwissenschaftler Arthur von Oettingen und Wilhelm Ostwald an der Universität Dorpat 11.00 Lucian Schiwietz (Bonn): Musikausbildung für den Dienst in Kirche und Schule an der Universität Königsberg 11.30 Folke Bohlin (Lund): Deutsche Einflüsse auf die Einführung von musikwissenschaftlichem Unterricht in Schweden 12.00 Urve Lippus (Tallin): The theme of Baltic music history in the letters of Elmar Arro to Karl Leichter 5. Musik an der Universität Greifswald 15.00 Peter Tenhaef (Greifswald): Die Rolle der Musik in akademischen Festakten der Universität Greifswald 15.30 Ekkehard Ochs (Greifswald): Eine historisch verspätete Entwicklung - Musik als Exercitium und akademisches Lehrfach an der Universität Greifswald im 19. und beginnenden 20. Jh. 16.30 Holger Kaminski (Hamburg): Friedrich Reinbrecht als Königlicher Musikdirektor und Akademischer Musiklehrer in Greifswald (1898-1907) 17.00 Eckhard Oberdörfer (Greifswald): Zwischen Anpassung und Aufmüpfigkeit ^Ö Studentenlied in Greifswald zu DDR-Zeiten 17.30 Abschlussdiskussion
Beate Bugenhagen Institut für Kirchenmusik & Musikwissenschaft Bahnhofstraße 48/49, 17487 Greifswald 03834-863502 beate.bugenhagen@uni-greifswald.de
Back to Index of Conferences Back to Index of Past Conferences, 2006
English "Musica Baltica: Universität und Musik im Ostseeraum" Deadline: 31.12.2005 Aus Anlass des 550jährigen Gründungsjubiläums der Universität Greifswald veranstaltet das Institut für Kirchenmusik und Musik- wissenschaft seinen elften internationalen musikwissenschaftlichen Kongress "Musica Baltica" zum Thema "Universität und Musik". Damit steht -- zwölf Jahre nach einem ersten kursorischen Überblick im Rahmen der Greifswalder Tagung "Akademisches Lehrfach und Exercitium" Musik an den Universitäten im Ostseeraum -- noch einmal die Musik an den Universitäten des Ostseeraums im Mittelpunkt. Der Ostseeraum ist reich an altehrwürdigen Universitäten. Mit der Alma Mater Rostochiensis wurde bereits 1419 die heute älteste Hochschule im baltischen Raum gegründet. Auch Skandinavien blickt mit Uppsala (gegründet 1477) und Kopenhagen (gegründet 1479) auf über 500 Jahre Universitätsgeschichte zurück, in der auch die Musik als Lehrfach oder in der Praxis ihren Platz hat. Der Greifswalder Kongress zielt freilich nicht nur auf die traditionsreichen Hochschulen des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, sondern auch auf in neuerer Zeit entstandene akademische Einrichtungen im Ostseeraum, die sich der Musikausbildung und -pflege verschrieben haben. Anknüpfend an den zuletzt von Emil Platen in seinem MGG-Artikel "Universität und Musik" zusammengefassten Forschungsstand sollen nachfolgende thematische Schwerpunkte diskutiert werden: 1. Die Etablierung der Musikwissenschaft als Forschungs- und vor allem als Lehrfach ist ohne die Universität nicht vorstellbar. War die ältere Musiklehre im Wesentlichen an den Lateinschulen angesiedelt (zumal im protestantischen Norden und Nordosten) und seit dem 16. Jahrhundert vor allem der musikalischen Praxis gewidmet, so führte im 19. Jahrhundert der Wandel vom "historisch interessierten Musik- direktor" zum "musikalisch interessierten Historiker und Philologen" (Platen) geradezu zwangsläufig zur Institutionalisierung der Musik- wissenschaft als universitäre Disziplin. Dieser Prozess ist jedoch für den Ostseeraum bislang noch keineswegs umfassend erhellt worden. Zu fragen wäre beispielsweise nach den jeweiligen Bedingungen, die zur Akzeptanz der Musik als wissenschaftliches Fach und zu ihrer Ein- gliederung in die universitas litterarum führten, aber auch danach, ob sich bestimmte regionale bzw. lokale Schwerpunkte (historisch, philo- logisch, ethnologisch) des Faches erkennen lassen. Von besonderem Interesse für das Gebiet der "Musica baltica" wären nähere Kenntnisse über mögliche Orientierungsmuster im Ostseeraum, die zu der Frage führen, ob es hier Formen des Lehr- und Forschungstransfers gegeben hat. 2. Als universitas magistrorum et studiosorum ist die Universität eine institutionell verfasste Gemeinschaft, die sich nicht nur durch das gemeinsame Interesse am Lehren und Lernen, sondern auch seit ihren Anfängen durch zahlreiche akademische Bräuche definiert. Dabei spielen bestimmte Formen der Musikpflege eine nicht unwichtige Rolle, haben sie hier doch besonders günstige Bedingungen getroffen. Allerdings sind die Spielarten der Musik im akademischen Leben (geistliche Musik ebenso wie etwa Fest- und Jubiläumsmusiken) grundsätzlich auch außer- halb der Universität vorstellbar. Zu fragen ist deshalb nicht nur allgemein nach den jeweiligen historischen wie aktuellen Formen akademischen Musizierens in den Universitäten des Ostseeraums -- immerhin wissen wir von der langen Existenz akademischer Musiklehrer in Uppsala ebenso wie in Helsinki oder Dorpat. Darüber hinaus wäre vor allem das spezifisch "Universitäre" solcher Musikübungen in den Blick zu nehmen. Beschränkt es sich auf schon dokumentierte Phänomene wie die Integration transnationaler musikalischer Gattungen und Formen in Lieder- oder Lautenbücher oder auf die Existenz typischer Studenten- lieder (auf die noch Johannes Brahms in seiner Akademischen Fest- ouvertüre nicht verzichten zu können glaubte)? Und sind Universitäts- chöre, -orchester und -musikdirektoren heutzutage noch Vertreter ihrer jeweiligen Hochschule, zeichnen sie sich durch ein spezifisch universitäres Repertoire aus oder bereichern sich lediglich den Pool an kommunalen musikalischen Institutionen, reduziert sich ihre Universitätszugehörigkeit auf ihren Namen bzw. die vom Semesterbetrieb abhängigen Termine ihrer Konzerte? 3. Universitäre Musiklehre und -praxis ist an Personen und Ämter gebunden. Das schließt allerdings die Existenz spezifisch universitärer Berufsbilder keineswegs ein -- schon deshalb nicht, weil Musiker, die an Universitäten wirkten, dort jahrhundertelang allem Anschein nach in der Regel nur nebenamtlich tätig waren. Wie es allerdings genau zuging, ist bislang noch kaum erarbeitet worden; von einer gründlichen Erforschung der universitären musikalischen Institutionen- bzw. Sozialgeschichte kann bislang nicht die Rede sein. Hier sollte der Greifswalder Kongress zumindest Anstöße geben. Zu untersuchen wäre vor allem der jeweilige Status der akademischen Musiker und ihre Vernetzung mit bzw. Emanzipation von städtischen oder kirchlichen musikalischen Ämtern. 4. Spätestens seit der Umwandlung der Musikakademien und Konservatorien in Hochschulen (in Westdeutschland in den 1970er und 1980er Jahren), die mit musikwissenschaftlichen Studiengängen sowie Promotions- und Habilitationsrecht ausgestattet sind, stellt sich die Frage nach dem Verhältnis zwischen Universität und Musikhochschule. Welche Rolle spielen universitäre Grundsätze der Lehre und Forschung in musikalischen Hochschulen? Haben sie sich im Ghetto von Lehrveranstaltungen in Musikgeschichte für angehende Sänger, Instrumentalisten und Musiklehrer angesiedelt, die bei Termin- und Raumengpässen gewöhnlich als erste zur Disposition stehen? Zu fragen wäre auch nach dem immer wieder gerne beschworenen Nutzen der unmittelbaren Nachbarschaft zwischen musikologischer Lehre und Forschung und vornehmlich der Einübung der Praxis dienenden Ausbildungszweigen. Liegt hier die eigentliche Zukunft der Beziehung zwischen Universität und Musik? Die bisherigen Greifswalder Konferenzen zum Generalthema "Musica baltica" haben gezeigt, wie sehr die Erhellung der Musikkultur des "Ostseeraums" von Fallstudien aus den betroffenen Regionen abhängt, und wie sehr es dabei neben der komponierten Musik vor allem auf das Musikleben, auf die soziale Funktion von Musik und Musizieren ankommt. Es hat, soviel scheint klar zu sein, im Ostseeraum eine eigene Musik ebenso wenig gegeben wie eine eigene Musikpraxis. Das gilt erst recht in der Gegenwart. Doch war dieser Raum in früheren Jahrhunderten lange Zeit maßgeblich durch die dominierende protestantische Religion ebenso wie durch die Ostsee als gemeinsamen, das Entstehen von Handelszentren befördernden Schifffahrtsweg definiert. Das beschleunigte kulturelle Transfers, den Austausch von Musikern und Musikalien, die Entstehung ähnlicher musikalischer Berufsbilder und damit korrespondierender Strukturen musikalischen Lebens. Insofern nimmt gerade die musikalische Sozial- und Institutionengeschichte, was den Ostseeraum betrifft, einen herausragen Stellenwert ein, und in diesem Kontext gewinnt das Thema des Kongresses, Universität und Musik, seine besondere Bedeutung. Nur wenn wir genaueres über den inter- universitären Transfer von Musik und Musikern wie von musikalischem Wissen, über die der Universität seit jeher eigentümlichen interkulturellen Begegnungen und über die Funktion universitärer Musik für die Institution Universität selbst wie für das lokale und inter- regionale Musikleben wissen, vermag der Begriff "Musica baltica" den Status eines heuristischen Begriffs abzulegen und sich mit Leben zu füllen. Wenngleich die Tagung sich vorrangig an Musikwissenschaftler/-innen richtet, ist ein interdisziplinärer Austausch mit der Geschichts- wissenschaft, Theologie, Kultur-, Sozial- oder Bildungsgeschichte wünschenswert. Der Call-for-Papers richtet sich sowohl an etablierte Forscher/-innen als auch ausdrücklich an junge Nachwuchswissen- schaftler/-innen.
Tagungsplan Mittwoch, 13. September 15.00 Eröffnung: Musik, Grußworte 1. Zwischen musica theorica und musica practica 15.30 Werner Braun (Saarbrücken): Aspekte des Klingenden. Zur Thematik in Universitätsschriften zwischen 1600 und 1750 16.00 Rainer Bayreuther (Weimar/Jena): Musikausbildung zwischen 1550 und 1650 an der Artistenfakultät der Uni Jena 17.00 Gudrun Viergutz (Jyväskylä): Das Musikprogramm bei den Einweihungsfeierlichkeiten der Universität Turku im Jahre 1640 Donnerstag, 14. September 2. Beispiel Danzig: Vom Gymnasium Dantiscanum zur Akademia Muzyczna 9.00 Danuta Szlagowska (Danzig): Music for the Professors of Gymnasium Dantiscanum 9.30 Danuta Popinigis (Danzig): In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Rektor - Musik von Thomas Struthius 10.30 Jolanta Wozniak (Danzig): Festkantate von F. Th. Kniewel (1817) zur Feier der Vereinigung des Akademischen Gymnasiums mit der Marienschule in Danzig 11.00 Jerzy M. Michalak (Danzig): Die Musik am Danziger Gymnasium 1817-1914 11.30 Violetta Kostka (Danzig): Students^Ò performances of operas in the Academy of Music in Gdansk 3. Universitäres Musikleben und berufliche Karrieren 14.00 Klaus-Peter Koch (Bonn): Studentische Orgel- und Lautentabulaturen im Ostseeraum des 16./17. Jahrhunderts und ihre Bedeutung für die Vermittlung europäischen Repertoires 14.30 Felix Pourtov (Leipzig): Absolventen der deutschen Universitäten als Musikverleger in St. Petersburg im 18. Jahrhundert 15.30 Harald Lönnecker (Koblenz): ^ÄGoldenes Leben im Gesang!^Ó ^Ö Gründung und Entwicklung Akademischer Gesangvereine an den Universitäten des Ostseeraums im 19. Jahrhundert 16.00 Andreas Waczkat (Münster): Die ersten akademischen Musiklehrer des 19. Jahrhunderts an der Universität Rostock Freitag, 15. September 9.00 Wladimir Gurewitsch (St. Petersburg): Die Universitätsmusik in St. Petersburg: Vergangenheit, Gegenwart, Zukunft 9.30 Geiu Rohtla (Tallin): Die Musikpflege und der Wirkungskreis eines Musiklehrers an der Kaiserlichen Universität in Dorpat/Tartu (1807-1893) 4. Frühe Musikwissenschaft im Ostseeraum 10.30 Karl Traugott Goldbach (Weimar): Die musiktheoretische Lehre der Naturwissenschaftler Arthur von Oettingen und Wilhelm Ostwald an der Universität Dorpat 11.00 Lucian Schiwietz (Bonn): Musikausbildung für den Dienst in Kirche und Schule an der Universität Königsberg 11.30 Folke Bohlin (Lund): Deutsche Einflüsse auf die Einführung von musikwissenschaftlichem Unterricht in Schweden 12.00 Urve Lippus (Tallin): The theme of Baltic music history in the letters of Elmar Arro to Karl Leichter 5. Musik an der Universität Greifswald 15.00 Peter Tenhaef (Greifswald): Die Rolle der Musik in akademischen Festakten der Universität Greifswald 15.30 Ekkehard Ochs (Greifswald): Eine historisch verspätete Entwicklung - Musik als Exercitium und akademisches Lehrfach an der Universität Greifswald im 19. und beginnenden 20. Jh. 16.30 Holger Kaminski (Hamburg): Friedrich Reinbrecht als Königlicher Musikdirektor und Akademischer Musiklehrer in Greifswald (1898-1907) 17.00 Eckhard Oberdörfer (Greifswald): Zwischen Anpassung und Aufmüpfigkeit ^Ö Studentenlied in Greifswald zu DDR-Zeiten 17.30 Abschlussdiskussion
beate.bugenhagen@uni-greifswald.de oder Beate Bugenhagen Institut für Kirchenmusik & Musikwissenschaft Bahnhofstraße 48/49 17487 Greifswald
Back to top of page
Back to index of conferences
Back to index of past conferences, 2006
Golden Pages index
Music Department Home Page
 
 
 
Last updated Tue, 28-Mar-2006 13:33 GMT / AU
Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX
Tel/Fax : +44 (0)1784 434455/437520