Department of Music

MUSIC AS HEARD: LISTENERS AND LISTENING IN LATE-MEDIEVAL & EARLY MODERN EUROPE (1300-1600)
A symposium held at Princeton University
Saturday and Sunday, 27-28 September 1997

MUSIC AS HEARD explores the cultural history of `the listener' and `music listening' in the period 1300-1600. Its aim is to promote the understanding, interpretation, and analysis of late- Medieval and Early Modern music in terms of the mentalities, sensibilities and belief-systems that conditioned its perception.

The symposium features twenty scholarly papers, which are to be discussed by authors and auditors in six plenary discussion sessions. The papers are not formally read out, but are made available to participants in a conference packet. During the sessions the focus is entirely on discussion.

SESSIONS

(Follow the links for abstracts)



SATURDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 1997

SESSION I
Chair: Peter Jeffery (Princeton University)

1 Methodological Preliminaries


Shai Burstyn (Tel Aviv University) Pre-1600 Music Listening: Some Methodological Issues

2 Listening in the Late-Medieval Intellectual Traditions


Peter M. Lefferts (University of Nebraska, Lincoln) Hearing is More Important Than Seeing: Eye and Ear in the Regule of Robert de Handlo

Sarah Fuller (SUNY at Stony Brook) `Delectabatur in hoc auris': Some Fourteenth-Century Perspectives on Aural Perception

Rob C. Wegman (Princeton University) `Outward' Perception and `Inward' Understanding: Johannes Tinctoris on Listening and the Phenomenon of Music

SESSION II
Chair: Thomas Y. Levin (Princeton University)

3 Listening and Patronage

Elizabeth Randell Upton (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) The Listener at Court: Late Fourteenth-Century Chansons and the Construction of Chivalric Identity

Sean Gallagher (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) What the Paduans Heard: Ciconia, Zabarella, and the Fortuna Patavorum

Keith Polk (University of New Hampshire) `Bonnes choses a ouÿr': Instrumental Ensemble Fantasias and Educated Listening in the Fifteenth Century


SESSION III
Chair: Robert Holzer (Yale University)

4 Listening and Death

Robert Nosow (Cary, North Carolina) Song and the Art of Dying

Grayson Wagstaff (Virginia Commonwealth University) Music for the Dead and the Control of Ritual Behavior in Spain, 1450-1550

5 Consonance As Heard

Peter Urquhart (University of New Hampshire) What Did Renaissance Musicians Hear?

Timothy R. McKinney (University of Texas, Arlington) Hearing in the Sixth Sense

SUNDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 1997

SESSION IV
Chair: Jessie-Ann Owens (Brandeis University)

6 Listening and Reading The Case of Glarean

Cristle Collins Judd (University of Pennsylvania)
`Silent Listening', Musical Commonplace Books, and Writing Theory: The Examples of the Dodecachordon

Harold Powers (Princeton University) The Lydian Mode: Gregor Meyer Reads Glarean



SESSION V
Chair: Emery Snyder (Princeton University)

7 Listening and Ideology in Reformation and Counter-Reformation

Robert Judd (University of Pennsylvania) Listening as Spiritual Combat in Counter Reformation Europe

Todd Borgerding (Colby College) Preachers, Pronunciation, and Music: Towards an Understanding of Rhetoric and Vocal Polyphony

Richard Freedman (Haverford College) `Divins accords': The Lassus Chansons and their Protestant Listeners of the Late Sixteenth Century

Paul Wiebe (University of Michigan) Music, The Emblematic, and `The Mystery of Holy Matrimony'


SESSION VI
Chair: Carolyn Abbate (Princeton University)

8 Listening and the Erotic in Early Modern Europe

Linda Phyllis Austern (Folger Shakespeare Library) `All Eares With Silent Rapture Charme': Performance, Audition and Erotic Disorders in Early Modern Europe

Louise K. Stein (University of Michigan) Eros, Erato, Terpsíchore and the Hearing of Music in Early Modern Spain

Kate van Orden (University of California, Berkeley) An Erotic Metaphysics of Hearing in Early Modern France