Research Hands on FLUTE

Research Hands on FLUTE

Research ‘Hands on’ FLUTE is a meeting dedicated to the area of the flute, and is unique due to its symbiosis between two types of meetings: the convention, of an artistic nature which concentrates on a particular instrument (such as the British Flute Society Convention 2016, for example) and the traditional academic research conference, but focusing on an instrumental area. ‘Hands on’ Flute aims to bridge the gap between artistic production and academic research, creating opportunities to combine the artists’ and the researchers’ knowledge, for mutual benefit. This first meeting will take place at the University of Aveiro from April 10th to 13th, 2017.

 

Call for Proposals

The University of Aveiro, INET-md (Institute of Ethnomusicology, Centre for Studies in Music and Dance) and the Associação Portuguesa de Flautas, will host the research meeting Research ‘Hands on’ FLUTE, in Aveiro, Portugal, from the 10th to the 13th of April, 2017.

This research meeting aims to bring artistic production and academic research closer together, creating opportunities to combine the artists’ and the researchers’ knowledge, which will have benefits for all. The invited keynotes speakers and performers, who have already confirmed, are: Sophie Cherrier; Paolo Taballione; Mario Caroli; Sibel Pensel; Berten Dhollander; Monica Finco; Christine Erlander Beard; Michele Gori; Stefano Parrino; Francesco Parrino; Qi Wang; Marco Gaudino; Luca Bellini (as soon as new names are confirmed they will be added to this list).

This first edition in 2017 focuses on the vast instrumental area of the flute – historical and modern performance practices, repertoire, pedagogy, aesthetics, ethnomusicology, history, analysis, organology and interpretation. Proposals that centre on performance practices as research are particularly welcome. Lecture-recitals are the most natural format for these proposals.

The conference organisers accept submissions in Portuguese and Spanish, although English is preferable. Proposals that focus on the above aspects are particularly encouraged, although other proposals may also be accepted, once they lie within the general theme of the meeting. Proposals that focus on any research area relating to flute performance will also be considered.

Proposals should be submitted via the platform Easy Chair, formatted according to the nature of the proposal (in order to fulfil the form, the applicants should first create an Easy Chair account):

  • Lecture Recitals: The abstract should include information regarding the duration of the presentation, which may be between 30 and 45 minutes, and a short artistic CV of the presenter(s). These submissions may also include a link to a Youtube video of the proposed performance (you may choose to upload your video as ‘unlisted’, ‘private viewing’ or ‘public viewing’). The link must be included in the field ‘other documents’ on the platform. The proposer must also specify any technical requirements or materials necessary for the recital.
  • Papers: Communications will be of a 20 minute duration. The abstract should contain a maximum of 350 words.
  • Recitals: Recitals will have a maximum duration of 30 minutes. You must send a recording/demo, which will be evaluated by the Artistic and Scientific Commission. Please include a short artistic CV of the performer(s). These submissions must include a link to a Youtube video of the proposed performance (you may choose to upload your video as ‘unlisted’, ‘private viewing’ or ‘public viewing’). The link must be included in the field ‘other documents’ on the platform. You must also specify any technical requirements or materials necessary for the recital.
  • Panels: In addition to the abstract and/or media, please send details regarding the panel participants, including their institutional affiliations, and the themes of each individual presentation. The total duration of the panel, including debate, should not exceed 90 minutes.
  • Presentation of Projects: The organising committee does not stipulate any particular model for these abstracts, but recommends that the proposals include information regarding the context, objectives, methods and results.
  • Demonstration of pedagogical approaches: These demonstrations should be of a 20 minute duration. Abstracts must not exceed 350 words.
  • Workshops: Please send a description and the duration of your proposed workshop.
  • Performative Installations: Abstracts should not exceed 350 words. Please use the field ‘other documents’ on the Easy Chair platform to upload your technical/material requirements. The installations could be made available during the four days of the meeting.

Should you have any queries (registration, travel, accommodation), please do not hesitate to contact us at deca-hands_on@ua.pt

Important Deadlines

The deadline for proposal submission is February 15th, 2017.

The acceptance of proposals, following a process of evaluation by the scientific and artistic commission, will be communicated no later than February 28th, 2017, with proposals from outside Europe being notified as quickly as possible.

The selected authors will be invited to submit an article or recording to the book of conference proceedings (with audio-visual support). All articles and recordings must be submitted by April 30th, 2017.

 

Organization

Associação Portuguesa de Flautas (APF)

Departamento de Comunicação e Arte

Instituto de Etnomusicologia Centro de Estudos em Música e Dança (INET-md)
Universidade de Aveiro

Image

Álvaro Sousa

Embodied Monologues Symposium

Call for Papers and Performances

EMBODIED MONOLOGUES SYMPOSIUM — MARCH 31, 2017

MAYNOOTH UNIVERSITY, IRELAND

Deadline for Proposals: January 9, 2017

In recent years, the emergence of practice-based and performance-led research has generated dynamic, productive and provocative new forms of understanding in humanities scholarship. Knowledge and experience derived from embodied practices have done much to expand the epistemic fields centred on the body and its place in philosophy and aesthetics. Associated with these developments, topics such as voice, performativity and subjectivity have been transformed and have in turn reshaped contemporary political and social concerns, and questions of human rights, disabilities, inequality, gender, and racial and social segregation.

The emergence of movement philosophy and literature especially, as well as a greater emphasis on the performer’s body as predicated in contemporary theatre practices, has opened new pathways for research only recently applied to music performance. As the one and only dramatic figure in monologues and monodramas, the solo performer has unprecedented agency in the dramaturgy and enactment of the piece. Yet even in monodrama, a dramatic genre supposedly condensed into one stage figure, production and staging are still the result of multilayered processes and agencies.

Embodied Monologues seeks to generate responses and challenges to the idea of solo or ‘mono’ performance. What is the role of the intertextual, the multimedial, the intercorporeal in this mode of performance? According to Bakthin’s The Dialogic Imagination “the centripetal forces of the life of language, embodied in a unitary language, operate in the midst of heteroglossia”. In performance, monologues and monodramas demonstrate the dynamics of this notion, combining the individual and the collective, the solo and the dialogical in complex and revealing ways. The series will explore solo performance through practice and research across the humanities, investigating the multiple forces at work during the production and performative processes. Embodied Monologues aims to promote an interdisciplinary exchange among performers, researchers, and practitioners whose work is based primarily—however not exclusively—on solo performance.

Proposals are invited for individual papers, lecture recitals, research reports, posters, video-installations and specific sessions in any area of solo embodied or practice-led research. Deadline for abstract (maximum 300 words) and short bio (maximum 100 word) is January 9, 2017. Proposals should be uploaded at http://www.embodiedmonologues.com/

KEYNOTE EVENTS:

Catherine Laws, Senior Lecturer Department of Music University of York, Senior Research Fellow at the Orpheus Institute, Ghent (BE);

Róisín O’Gorman, Lecturer in Drama & Theatre Studies, University College Cork.

SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZER:

Francesca Placanica, Maynooth University Francesca.Placanica@nuim.ie

 

COMMITTEE:

Christopher Morris, Professor of Music, Maynooth University;

Francesca Placanica, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Maynooth University;

Benjamin Spatz, Senior Lecturer in Drama Theatre and Performance, University of Huddersfield.

 

ODC2017 Traditions-Transitions

Orpheus Doctoral Conference 2017

Traditions-Transitions

22-23 February 2017

Orpheus Institute, Ghent

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Orpheus Doctoral Conference 2017, Traditions-Transitions, will explore how different modes of relationships between past and present affect musical performance practice and composition. Further, practitioners and researchers from the fields of music and social sciences will draw on Eric Hobsbawm’s notion of “invented traditions”, examining how traditions are forged, broken or interrupted and how they might be used as sources of renewal.

The conference will feature lectures by Richard Taruskin, Joanna Dudley (tbc), Sigiswald Kuijken and Esteban Buch as well as a musical gallery in which performances and installations addressing the conference topics will be interspersed with moderated discussions between artists and our guest speakers.

We invite researchers, practitioners and artist researchers within related fields to submit proposals that address the broad range of issues involved in the conference topics. Submissions should include, but are not limited to, themes that place strong emphasis on the interplay between social practices and musical performance. We welcome contributions in the form of theoretical papers, performances or a combination of the two.

For more information please visit http://www.orpheusinstituut.be/en/news/2016/10/call-for-proposals-odc-2017.

With the friendly support of the Academy of Creative and Performing Arts of the University of Leiden.

 

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION

Submissions should be sent by email to odc2017@docartes.be and must include:

  • Name, organization (if any), email and phone contact
  • Abstract (max 250 words) + 3 keywords
  • Technical rider for proposals requiring equipment other than A/V
  • List of references (optional)
  • Short bio (max 150 words) and list of main publications/performances/works as well as links to supporting image, audio and video files.

Presentations are limited to 20 minutes. The language of the conference is English.

Call for proposals deadline: 15 November 2016

Notification of acceptance: 15 December 2016

Orpheus Research Seminar 2016 – Sound Work: Composition as Critical Technical Practice

The 10th Orpheus Research Seminar offers the opportunity for contributors from around the world to gather and explore the theme of composition as critical technical practice.

This seminar – convened by Jonathan Impett – will consider composition as a research activity – a process informed by theory and intuition, constraint and contingency, expectation and experience. It is a continuous iterative process of inscription and reflection in which its models, metaphors, aspirations, obligations, tools and technologies all play a part. This process is distributed temporally, socially and materially. The artefacts of composition – however notated, improvised, virtual, embodied or technologically implemented – are hybrid technical objects. Neither pure ‘inspiration’ not unmediated formalism account for what they contribute. We might rather consider composition as a design process, and study its dynamics and decisions in the spirit of critical technical practice – a term coined by Philip Agre in his work on the creation of the artefacts of artificial intelligence.

Call for Proposals

Practitioners from all disciplines are invited to submit proposals for presentations. We particularly welcome proposals for presentations that explore the demonstration of composition as research in innovative ways.

Deadline for Proposals: August 17, 2016.

Send us your proposal through info@orpheusinstituut.be

Download the full call in PDF

Keynote speakers

  • Nicolas Collins, Professor of Sound at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)
  • Alan Blackwell, Professor of Interdisciplinary Design, University of Cambridge (TBC

More info on the seminar

Given the prominence of the work and its author, of originality and development in Western art music, we might expect composition to be seen as the very embodiment of the notion of music as knowledge-production. Practice-as-research and artistic research have reached a relatively mature stage of assimilation and consensus, and yet the role of composition as research remains much debated in some quarters, unhelpfully unclear in others. Is this a question of communication, of discourse, of process and reflection, of composition as a cultural activity, or of its wider intellectual context?

The self-reporting of composition tends to consider the areas in which it aspires to be innovative, or the theories – musical, aesthetic, social, scientific, technological – that have informed the work, rather than research aspects of the activity of composition itself. The knowledge presented in such cases often lies outside composition. There is no shortage of investigation of the ontology and epistemology of the ‘work’ as a persisting historical cultural phenomenon, but the technologies and context of composition have undergone a paradigm shift. The present, to repurpose a phrase, is another country.

This seminar will consider composition as a research activity, as reflective critical making. Composition walks a tightrope between formalism and the arbitrary, a process informed by theory and intuition, constraint and contingency, expectation and experience. It is a continuous iterative process of inscription and reflection in which its models, metaphors, aspirations, obligations, tools and technologies all play a part. This process is distributed temporally, socially and materially. The artefacts of composition – however notated, improvised, virtual, embodied or technologically implemented – are hybrid technical objects. Neither pure ‘inspiration’ not unmediated formalism account for what they contribute. We might rather consider composition as a design process, and study its dynamics and decisions in the spirit of critical technical practice – a term coined by Philip Agre in his work on the creation of the artefacts of artificial intelligence.

Registration

http://www.orpheusinstituut.be/en/events/sound-work-composition-as-critical-technical-practice

VIRTUAL WORKS – ACTUAL THINGS

International Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016
4-6 April 2016, Orpheus Institute Ghent, BE
The Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016 will focus on the relation between the virtual multiplicities that enable an imaginary perception of musical works and the actual, concrete materials and practices that make such imaginary constructions possible. With the contribution of a most distinguished faculty, the event will give room for discussion on recent developments that are challenging the debate around the work-concept (Lydia Goehr), the question of the autonomy of music (Gunnar Hindrichs), the canonical tendency of past musical pieces (Andreas Dorschel), new ontologies (David Davies), the potentialities emerging from editorial and performative practices (John Rink), and a new image of work inspired by the notion of multiplicity and pointing towards a domain specific assemblage theory (Paulo de Assis, convenor).image Academy2016.jpg
In our globalized and hyper-mediatized culture, musical works are currently determined by Western consumers and profit-oriented professional performers rather than by transhistorical creative and productive processes. A renewed gaze upon the innumerable things that actually enable the here-and-now appearance of musical works (drafts, sketches, manuscripts, editions, recordings, comments, instruments, analysis, etc.) opens up wider horizons for reflection and, crucially, for future practices.

Faculty

With the contribution of a most distinguished faculty, the Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016 will discuss recent developments that are challenging the debate around the work-concept (Goehr), the question of the autonomy of music (Hindrichs), the canonical tendency of past musical pieces (Dorschel), new ontologies (Davies), the potentialities emerging from editorial and performative practices (Rink), and a new image of work inspired by the notion of multiplicity and pointing towards
a domain specific assemblage theory (Assis).

  • Lydia Goehr, Columbia University, New York, US
  • David Davies, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Andreas Dorschel, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz (KUG), Graz, Austria
  • Gunnar Hindrichs, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
  • John Rink, St John’s College, Cambridge, UK

Academy convenor

Paulo de Assis

Doctors in Performance

DOCTORS IN PERFORMANCE
The first festival conference of music performance and artistic research
University of the Arts Helsinki–Sibelius Academy
Helsinki Music Centre, Sept. 4–5, 2014
Organizer: DocMus Doctoral School

The DocMus Doctoral School at the Sibelius Academy Helsinki invites artistic research performers at doctoral and post-doctoral levels to take part in the first
festival conference of music performance and artistic research.
Keynote performers:

Laurence Dreyfus, PhD (Columbia), Diplôme Supérieur (Brussels), Hon RAM, FBA, D.Litt (Oxon)

Matti Raekallio, DMus (Sibelius Academy), Pianist, Professor at Juilliard School (NY)

Since 1988, Sibelius Academy has offered a doctoral degree through its Arts Study Program, where the main focus of study is on independent artistic work. This means that after their master’s degrees, musicians can still continue to develop the very essence of their skills—their artistic work. Through their studies, artistic doctoral students also develop their skills in the field of artistic research, but this never suppresses the artistic focus, the actual music making. The organizer of the festival conference, the DocMus Doctoral School, has for more than two decades acted as a pioneer agent in developing the artistic Doctor of Music degree in Europe.

In September 2014, doctoral students working in the fields of musical performance and practice-based or artistic research (in music; Western art music, jazz, folk music) are invited to participate in a new festival conference, Doctors in Performance. In general, conferences with an actual performance focus are rare if not non-existent. Instead of exclusively introducing paper presentations or having live performances as a curiosity or mere decoration, Doctors in Performance highlights the music itself. Therefore, each of the presentations will consist of a musical performance (solo or chamber music) of 40 minutes maximum. The performance can take the form of a recital or a concert lecture. The music performed is expected to include or relate closely to the contents of the doctoral degree the student is pursuing. Those who have already achieved their doctoral degrees can focus on their postdoctoral topics. A paper presentation on artistic research (20 minutes maximum) is also possible in the auditorium sessions (only an upright piano will be available).

Forms for presentations:

a) recital, 40’ (+ 10’ discussion)
b) concert lecture, 40’ (+ 10’ discussion)
c) paper presentation, 20’(+ 5’ discussion)

Doctors in Performance will offer three halls for recitals and an auditorium for paper presentations. See links about the available halls:

The Camerata Hall of Helsinki Music Centre
The Organo Hall of Helsinki Music Centre (organ, harpsichord available)
The Black Box of Helsinki Music Centre
The Auditorium of Helsinki Music Centre

A grand piano, three organs and a harpsichord are available for performers. Also a limited set of percussion instruments will be available. The festival prefers programmes with small percussion sets.

Conference proceedings for Doctors in Performance will be published in advance on the conference website and in print. This will serve as a concert programme as well as provide background information about the participants and their research topics. The applicants are therefore encouraged to include written comments discussing how their artistic and other research work support each other and towards which common goal they are directed.
The proposal must be accompanied by

– a detailed program of the recital (not more than 40 minutes): composers, work titles, composition years, opus numbers)
– a written summary of the student’s doctoral degree studies and research topics (500 words maximum)
– curriculum vitae and contact information
– equipment needed for performances and presentations (all instruments, data projectors, etc.)

Please, fill in the on-line submission form and submit it as instructed in the conference site. The submission time is 15th January – 1st March 2014. The link to the site is here.

The proposals will be peer-reviewed anonymously. Successful contributors will be notified via email by 1st May 2014.

Organising Committee

Kari Kurkela, Vice Dean of Sibelius Academy
Tuire Kuusi, Director of the DocMus Doctoral School, Sibelius Academy
Annikka Konttori-Gustafsson, Assistant Director of the DocMus Doctoral School, Sibelius Academy
Anne Sivuoja-Kauppala, Professor of of Performance Research, DocMus Doctoral School, Sibelius Academy
Kati Hämäläinen, Assistant Professor, DocMus Doctoral School, Sibelius Academy
Margit Rahkonen, Lecturer in Piano Music, DocMus Doctoral, School Sibelius Academy
Anu Vehviläinen, Assistant Professor, DocMus Doctoral School, Sibelius Academy
Markus Kuikka, Coordinator of Advanced Study, DocMus Doctoral School, Sibelius Academy

For further information, please contact:

Anu Vehviläinen, DMus, Pianist, Assistant Professor, anu(at)vehvilainen.net
Markus Kuikka, DMus, Doctoral Study Coordinator, markus.kuikka(at)siba.fi