Creating music across cultures in the 21st century

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Creating music across cultures in the 21st century

Istanbul Technical University, 25-27 May 2017

In the context of one of the world’s most organic melting pots, Istanbul, The Centre for Advanced Studies in Music, Istanbul Technical University, will host an international conference, in partnership with the European Research Council funded project “Beyond East and West,” May 25-27, 2017.

No music is an island.  Since time immemorial, cultures have traded and mixed musics across their domains, yet only in the 21st century have people around the world gained instant and virtually free access to musics beyond those of their neighbors.  The history of these mixings has been marked by a plethora of descriptors, some benign and others acerbic.  Depending on one’s perspective, the “other” musics span the gamut of primitive (“first”), Oriental, classical, art, learned, popular, etc.  Their mixtures have been termed synthetic, syncretic, trans-traditional, trans-cultural, intercultural, cross-cultural, borrowed, or globalized.  The oral and the literate have been contrasted, while the exotic has been vilified.  Quests for musical beauty and knowledge have been shaped by political, economic and social, hegemonic forces.  We are now at a point where, for the first time in history, the playing field has reached a new level of equity, with widespread access to a majority of the world’s traditions, on a scale radically different from a mere generation ago.

We invite proposals for papers (20-minute presentation plus 10-minute discussion) on any topic related to the mixing of musics from different musical traditions.  In addition to mixtures of maqam, raga, and other art traditions, we encourage proposals concerning the incorporation of “folk,” “traditional,” and “low-technology” musics in our 21st-century milieu. Our conference will be Interdisciplinary, and we welcome proposals from composers, performers, improvisers, musicologists, critical theorists, music philosophers, ethnomusicologists, and—especially—etcetera.  While springing from a notated art music tradition, we welcome other perspectives, oral traditions, and boundary stretchers.

Deadline: Please send a 250-word abstract to Robert Reigle, rreigle@gmail.com, with subject heading “Creating Music across Cultures-Abstract,” by 6 March 2017.  We will announce acceptances by 20 March.

Keynote speaker: Dr. Münir Nurettin Beken, Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of California, Los Angeles.

Programme committee: Prof. Amanda Bayley, Prof. Şehvar Beşiroğlu, Prof. Sandeep Bhagwati, Dr. Michael Ellison, Dr. E. Şirin Özgün, Dr. Robert F. Reigle.

Website: http://www.miam.itu.edu.tr/cmac2017/index.html

Conference Fee: Full conference, 3 days: €60 / 200-Turkish Lira; 2 days: €40 / 140-TL; 1 day: €20 / 70-TL.

(€ international/TL local rates).  Free for students, both international and local.

We gratefully acknowledge funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant no. 648810), and MIAM Centre for Advanced Studies in Music.

Research Hands on FLUTE

Research Hands on FLUTE

Research ‘Hands on’ FLUTE is a meeting dedicated to the area of the flute, and is unique due to its symbiosis between two types of meetings: the convention, of an artistic nature which concentrates on a particular instrument (such as the British Flute Society Convention 2016, for example) and the traditional academic research conference, but focusing on an instrumental area. ‘Hands on’ Flute aims to bridge the gap between artistic production and academic research, creating opportunities to combine the artists’ and the researchers’ knowledge, for mutual benefit. This first meeting will take place at the University of Aveiro from April 10th to 13th, 2017.

 

Call for Proposals

The University of Aveiro, INET-md (Institute of Ethnomusicology, Centre for Studies in Music and Dance) and the Associação Portuguesa de Flautas, will host the research meeting Research ‘Hands on’ FLUTE, in Aveiro, Portugal, from the 10th to the 13th of April, 2017.

This research meeting aims to bring artistic production and academic research closer together, creating opportunities to combine the artists’ and the researchers’ knowledge, which will have benefits for all. The invited keynotes speakers and performers, who have already confirmed, are: Sophie Cherrier; Paolo Taballione; Mario Caroli; Sibel Pensel; Berten Dhollander; Monica Finco; Christine Erlander Beard; Michele Gori; Stefano Parrino; Francesco Parrino; Qi Wang; Marco Gaudino; Luca Bellini (as soon as new names are confirmed they will be added to this list).

This first edition in 2017 focuses on the vast instrumental area of the flute – historical and modern performance practices, repertoire, pedagogy, aesthetics, ethnomusicology, history, analysis, organology and interpretation. Proposals that centre on performance practices as research are particularly welcome. Lecture-recitals are the most natural format for these proposals.

The conference organisers accept submissions in Portuguese and Spanish, although English is preferable. Proposals that focus on the above aspects are particularly encouraged, although other proposals may also be accepted, once they lie within the general theme of the meeting. Proposals that focus on any research area relating to flute performance will also be considered.

Proposals should be submitted via the platform Easy Chair, formatted according to the nature of the proposal (in order to fulfil the form, the applicants should first create an Easy Chair account):

  • Lecture Recitals: The abstract should include information regarding the duration of the presentation, which may be between 30 and 45 minutes, and a short artistic CV of the presenter(s). These submissions may also include a link to a Youtube video of the proposed performance (you may choose to upload your video as ‘unlisted’, ‘private viewing’ or ‘public viewing’). The link must be included in the field ‘other documents’ on the platform. The proposer must also specify any technical requirements or materials necessary for the recital.
  • Papers: Communications will be of a 20 minute duration. The abstract should contain a maximum of 350 words.
  • Recitals: Recitals will have a maximum duration of 30 minutes. You must send a recording/demo, which will be evaluated by the Artistic and Scientific Commission. Please include a short artistic CV of the performer(s). These submissions must include a link to a Youtube video of the proposed performance (you may choose to upload your video as ‘unlisted’, ‘private viewing’ or ‘public viewing’). The link must be included in the field ‘other documents’ on the platform. You must also specify any technical requirements or materials necessary for the recital.
  • Panels: In addition to the abstract and/or media, please send details regarding the panel participants, including their institutional affiliations, and the themes of each individual presentation. The total duration of the panel, including debate, should not exceed 90 minutes.
  • Presentation of Projects: The organising committee does not stipulate any particular model for these abstracts, but recommends that the proposals include information regarding the context, objectives, methods and results.
  • Demonstration of pedagogical approaches: These demonstrations should be of a 20 minute duration. Abstracts must not exceed 350 words.
  • Workshops: Please send a description and the duration of your proposed workshop.
  • Performative Installations: Abstracts should not exceed 350 words. Please use the field ‘other documents’ on the Easy Chair platform to upload your technical/material requirements. The installations could be made available during the four days of the meeting.

Should you have any queries (registration, travel, accommodation), please do not hesitate to contact us at deca-hands_on@ua.pt

Important Deadlines

The deadline for proposal submission is February 15th, 2017.

The acceptance of proposals, following a process of evaluation by the scientific and artistic commission, will be communicated no later than February 28th, 2017, with proposals from outside Europe being notified as quickly as possible.

The selected authors will be invited to submit an article or recording to the book of conference proceedings (with audio-visual support). All articles and recordings must be submitted by April 30th, 2017.

 

Organization

Associação Portuguesa de Flautas (APF)

Departamento de Comunicação e Arte

Instituto de Etnomusicologia Centro de Estudos em Música e Dança (INET-md)
Universidade de Aveiro

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Álvaro Sousa

3rd International Conference of Dalcroze Studies (ICDS3)

Call for submissions

3rd International Conference of Dalcroze Studies (ICDS3)

‘The living moment: Exploring improvisational practice’

30 July – 03 August 2017

Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

www.dalcroze-studies.com

 

The conference

The aim of ICDS3 is to present the best of current research and practice within Dalcroze Studies and related fields. ICDS is a global, transdisciplinary forum, open to viewpoints from education, the arts and humanities, and the social, health and life sciences. We welcome practitioners and scholars alike. This year our theme is improvisation in music, dance, somatic practices, theatre and therapy, with a special focus on the relationships between music/sound and movement.

 

Keynote speakers (confirmed)

Reto W. Kressig, Professor and Chair of Geriatrics, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel (UAB), Felix-Platter Hospital, University of Basel, Switzerland

Raymond MacDonald, Professor of Music Psychology and Improvisation, Reid School of Music, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Max van Manen, Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta, Canada

Keynote practitioners (confirmed)

Ruth Alperson (PhD), Dean, Hoff-Barthelson Music School, USA

Ruth Gianadda, Professor, Institute Jaques-Dalcroze, Geneva, Switzerland

Karin Greenhead, Director of Studies, Dalcroze UK

Lisa Parker, Director, Longy Dalcroze Institute, Longy School of Music of Bard College, USA

 

‘The living moment: Exploring improvisational practice’

Improvisation forms the basis of human communication from infancy to the end of life. It defines the moment-to-moment flow of activity in our everyday interactions and is fundamental to creativity and innovation.

Improvisation is also central to music, dance and somatic traditions across culture, time and space. Musical and movement improvisation can be put to work in many contexts, including the pedagogical, therapeutic and performative, to bring about transformation. Improvisation can be both process and product, and an agent of change.

In Dalcroze Eurhythmics and related fields of practice, musical and movement improvisation are the main means of communication between teacher and learner, therapist and client, and between participants themselves.

 

Call for proposals

We welcome presentations on improvisation, as it relates to Dalcroze Eurhythmics and music, movement and the mindful body more broadly. We embrace a wide range of disciplines and areas, such as: anthropology, architecture, biomedical science, communication science, cultural studies, dance studies, somatic practices, education, ethnomusicology, gender studies, history, literature, media studies, musicology, music therapy, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology, theatre and performance studies, and visual arts.

We invite practitioners and researchers to share their knowledge, experience and scholarship on this theme. Conference topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Music-movement improvisation
  • Descriptions and theories of improvisation
  • Improvisation and embodiment
  • Improvisation in culture and improvisation as culture
  • Improvisation as social relationship or dialogue
  • Improvisation as process, as product, as means
  • Interdisciplinary and intermedial approaches to improvisation
  • Teaching improvisation
  • The role of improvisation in pedagogy, performance, therapy and research
  • Teaching as an improvisational practice
  • Assessing and evaluating improvisation
  • Developing curricula and educational material on improvisation
  • Improvisation and the professional development of teachers
  • The interaction of technology and improvisation
  • Improvisation and wellbeing
  • Personal and social development through improvisation
  • Improvisation and ethics (empowerment, social justice)
  • Improvisation and community
  • The historical development and transmission of improvisational practice in Dalcroze Eurhythmics and related fields

 

Types of presentation

  • Paper* (20 mins + 10 mins discussion) – research papers and reflections on practice
  • Workshop* (60 mins, including discussion) – an interactive session offering hands-on experience. These will be limited in number due to space and time restrictions
  • Symposium (90 mins, including discussion) – a shared platform for at least three delegates to present a specific research topic in-depth and to discuss each other’s work in a public forum. Please specify who will chair the symposium.
  • Roundtable (90 mins, including discussion) – a semi-planned conversation amongst stakeholders who wish to have a public dialogue to which delegates can contribute. Instead of presenting research results, a roundtable is a public discussion with a view to arriving at shared understandings, new insights and/or proposals for action. Please specify who will chair the roundtable.
  • Informal daytime performance (duration variable, to be arranged with organising committee)
  • Evening performance (duration variable, to be arranged with organising committee)
  • Poster
  • Presentation to host ICDS5 in 2021 (20 mins + 10 mins discussion); we would love to hear from organisations or institutions in any country who would like to host a future conference! 

 

Submission

Submit your proposal/s at www.dalcroze-studies.com

Deadline for all submissions: Sunday 27 November 2016 23:59 (BST)

The language of presentations is English.

Delegates may submit a maximum of three proposals.

Notification to presenters by 18 December 2016

 

Online registration

Presenters must register and pay by 13 January 2017

All other delegates must register and pay by 30 June 2017

 

Fees*

Before 31 March 2017 (Early bird rates): Regular $375; Student $250

After 31 March 2017: Regular $450; Student $325

Fee includes refreshments, light lunch and conference materials

(*All fees are in Canadian dollars and subject to tax by the Federal / Provincial government; please go to the registration pages for more information)

 

Scientific Committee

Dr John Habron (Senior Lecturer) Coventry University, Coventry, UK (Chair)

Dr Ruth Alperson (Dean) Hoff-Barthelson Music School, New York, USA

Karin Greenhead (Director of Studies) Dalcroze UK

Dr Marja-Leena Juntunen (Professor) Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts, Helsinki, Finland

Dr Louise Mathieu (Professor) Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Dr Selma Odom (Professor Emerita) York University, Toronto, Canada

Dr Jane Southcott (Associate Professor) Monash University, Victoria, Australia

 

Organising Committee

Prof. Josée Vaillancourt (Chair), Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Prof. Louise Mathieu (Co-Chair), Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Prof. Ursula Stuber, Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Prof. Gilles Comeau, University of Ottawa, Canada

 

www.dalcroze-studies.com

 

 

 

 

 

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

Gesellschaft für Tanzforschung · GTF Annual Conference 2016 · Call for papers

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

November 18–20, 2016 · Orff-Institute of the University Mozarteum/Salzburg

The term TRACES has been positioned very intentionally between the two central artistic means of expression SOUNDS and MOVES, as interface so to speak, since sounds as well as bodily movements can both be regarded as traces due to their volatility in space and time. They can enter into a dialog with other artistic traces (of movement), such as the grand brushstroke of a painter, the fine drawings of a graphic artist or the light projections of a digital installation, in order to access further dimensions of space and time for the hearing and seeing of movement dynamics. Against this backdrop, an (in the best sense) endlessly creative process gathers momentum, in which audible and/or visible movement traces are permanently recreated, without ever getting clearly defined contours nor even taking a definite shape.

What kinds of artistic options are possible due to such interactions between sound- and movement traces, either in the form of a performance or an event? And what kinds of challenges result from this for the spectators/listeners – particularly if these interactions primarily unfold within the area of the non-verbal, beyond the obvious allocations of meaning or outstanding narrative threads? This conference will discuss perspectives based on (rehearsal) processes and production aesthetics as well as questions relating to the perception of the interplay of analogue/digital, instrumental/ vocal and musical or noise-like sounds with virtual or real body movements in choreographies, improvisations and dance performances: The objective is to ‘trace’ audio-visual movement traces and the resulting network of sensory impressions.

Deadline for proposals for lectures, workshops, poster presentations, lecture demonstrations, performances and labs (please give the preferred format) is May 1.

Please send the respective proposal with a maximum of 250 words and a short biography of 100 words at most to Stephanie Schroedter: st.schroedter@t-online.de

You will be informed about the programme selection by June 1, 2016 at the latest.
For more information look at: http://www.gtf-tanzforschung.de

Continental Drift: 50 years of jazz in Europe

CALL FOR PAPERS

Continental Drift: 50 Years of Jazz from Europe
16th and 17th of July, 2016

A two-day conference at Edinburgh Napier University, UK, in association with the Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Festival.

The organisers seek proposals for papers (to be delivered as a 20×20” slide-based presentation) based on two central themes that will function as stimulus for panel discussions:

  1. Key factors in the development of jazz in Europe.
  2. Moving forward – the future of jazz in Europe.

We intend to include a broad range of interdisciplinary perspectives around these topics including but not limited to historical, analytical, philosophical, economical, cultural, political, and pedagogical viewpoints. We welcome proposals from any disciplinary background.

Conference proceedings will take two main forms:

  1. Each presenter will be invited to submit an article based on their presentation which will be published as part of an edited collection – details TBC.
  2. The event will be filmed and released as an open-access online resource.

Proposals should include the following details:

Presenter Name
Institutional affiliation (if appropriate)
Email address
Title of paper
300-word abstract

Please send your abstract to continentaldriftconference@gmail.com by Tuesday the 1st of March 2016. You will be notified of the outcome by Monday the 14th of March.

Dr Haftor Medbøe, Dr Zack Moir, and Prof. Chris Atton
Conference Organisers
Researchers in Residence (Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival)

w: http://www.continentaldriftconference.co.uk
t: http://www.twitter.com/eurojazz50

Arts Without Borders? Perspectives on Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in and through the Arts

 

Call for Papers

Arts Without Borders? Perspectives on Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in and through the Arts

An international conference hosted by the University of the Arts Helsinki and CERADA (Center for Educational Research and Academic Development in the Arts), Finland

October 19-22, 2016

We are experiencing a renaissance in the power of the arts, even where political will is lacking. Artists increasingly make their own futures and work collaboratively across disciplines. Dimensions of creativity and innovation, empowered learning, distributed and ethical leadership, and entrepreneurship and activism, all of which are embedded within artistic practices, are being recognized as critical to contemporary societies in diverse ways. At the same time arts institutions in Higher Education, many of which have operated as small organizations focused on a single discipline, are starting to merge and to collaborate at interdisciplinary levels. This trend raises many questions about purpose and principles, and indeed in some contexts arts organisations are resisting pressures to merge, seeing these being driven by finance and bureaucracy, and perceiving a threat to their own core purpose and quality.

This international conference will explore the potential and challenges of interdisciplinarity, and the full scope of the performing and visual arts in discovering new territories and evolving beyond existing paradigms. Through the event we aim to set agendas and mobilize global networks, generating dialogue and exchange between researchers, arts practitioners, and professionals from a wide range of disciplines including education, psychology, health care, organizational management and leadership.

Conference themes

  • Collaborative processes, conflict and leadership: leveraging individual and collective expertise, empowering new knowledge and enabling the full potential of the arts
  • Improvisation, creativity and innovation: exploring tensions between traditional and contemporary practices, notated repertoire and making new work.
  • Connecting the arts beyond their own disciplines: new visions for breaking through professional silos and embracing diversity
  • Rethinking paradigms of purpose in the arts: dimensions of quality, entrepreneurship, impact and activism

Keynotes

Efva Lilja, choreographer http://www.efvalilja.se

Helen Marriage, director, Artichoke http://www.artichoke.uk.com

(The full list of keynotes will be announced at a later date).

We welcome the following categories of proposals related to the Conference themes

  1. Research papers & performance papers
  2. Practical workshops
  3. Symposia
  4. Individually tailored proposals

The deadline to submit an abstract proposal is January 11, 2016

All outcomes will be known by March 14, 2016

Proposals for papers will be peer reviewed and proposals for performances and workshops will be included on the basis of quality, engagement and relevance to the strands. Abstracts should be written in English, and should be around 400 words.

Conference Organising Committee            University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland

  • Professor Helena Gaunt Sibelius Academy
  • Patrick Furu Sibelius Academy
  • Professor Heidi Westerlund Sibelius Academy
  • Kai Lehikoinen Theatre Academy
  • Professor Riikka Stewen Academy of Fine Arts

(Full Peer Review Scientific Committee to be confirmed)

Please find the proposal guidelines on the Conference website and submit your abstract using the electronic form provided:

http://www.uniarts.fi/arts-without-borders

For further details please contact: Katja Thomson katja.thomson@uniarts.fi

 

 

 

 

(Per)Forming Art: Performance as Research in Contemporary Artworks

20 Sep 15

University of Leeds

The acts of composing and performing are central processes to the formation of a musical work. Performance is a medium through which music is formed. It is a significant part of a work’s compositional process and, as such, forms a symbiotic relationship with the act of composing. An iterative cycle between performance and composition comes about when the composer performs their own work and/or composes through performance. Performance in this manner can be seen as a form of practice-based research that can guide the compositional process.

This RMA conference focuses on performance as a type of compositional technique and as a mode of practice-based research for the act of composing a work. Primarily engaging with music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, ‘(Per)Forming Art’ invites proposals for a series of lecture-recitals by composers to demonstrate their research through performance. Such disciplines include, but are not limited to, acoustic composition, electronic composition, composing with improvisation, live coding. Presenters and delegates will have the opportunity to meet other researchers, performers, and composers as well as learn about a variety of approaches, techniques, and processes relevant to the formation of an artwork.

Proposals are invited for forty-minute lecture-recital slots (thirty minutes for presenting and performing followed by ten minutes for questions and answers). Composers may perform their own works or invite performers to accompany them (performers will not be provided by the conference).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Performance as practice-based research of compositional techniques in general
  • Performance as an actual technique for composing music
  • How performing other works can inform the compositional process of one’s own work and/or how one engages with performance as a compositional technique
  • How engaging with other performers performing other works can inform the compositional process of one’s own artwork.
  • Live coding and its influence on compositional practice
  • Improvisation and its influence on compositional practice
  • Performance as a unifying medium between separate artistic disciplines within interdisciplinary artworks
  • Performance as a technique for composing a work vs performing a ‘finished’ composed work

Presenters will also be asked to perform in the conference concert on the evening of the conference. The artwork(s) they perform should be related to (if not the same as) their lecture-recital topic. Proposed lecture-recitals should be emailed as abstracts (of up to 500 words, and with titles) to the (Per)Forming Art Symposium (performingartsymposium@gmail.com) no later than Monday 6th July, 2015.

Lecture-recital proposals should include the following details: name, institutional affiliation (if any), email address, any special requests such as AV requirements.

Further information can be found here.

2015 Conference of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA): French Connections – Networks of Influence and Modes of Transmission of French Baroque Keyboard Music

2015 International Conference of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America

May 21-24, 2015

The Schulich School of Music of McGill University, Montreal, Canada

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PERFORMANCES

The Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) and the Schulich School of Music of McGill University (Montreal, Canada) are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the Fourth Annual Meeting of HKSNA:

“French Connections: Networks of Influence and Modes of Transmission of French Baroque Keyboard Music”

The conference will be held at the Schulich School of Music, McGill University, from May 21 to 24, 2015.

Details of the Event and Requirements for Presenters:

The conference aims to deepen understanding of French baroque keyboard music, its style, influence, transmission, and the different teaching traditions that nourished it. Although it is difficult to speak of a single French baroque keyboard style, it remains true that the grand siècle generated a musical classicism cultivated by keyboardists not only in France but transnationally. Often, the terms ‘baroque’ and ‘classical’ are used interchangeably in relation to both the repertoire and instruments of the period.

A special section of the conference is dedicated to the internationally-renowned organist and pedagogue, John Grew, Professor Emeritus at McGill University and an expert of the French baroque organ and harpsichord repertoires.Concerts by guest keyboard performers will also be offered to conference participants and the general public, and master classes will be open to qualified students and participants.

The programme committee encourages submissions of individual papers, round-table discussions, group sessions, lecture-recitals, mini-recitals, and multimedia demonstrations on the following topics as they relate to French baroque keyboard music and historical keyboards:

  • Networks of influence within and beyond France;
  • Pedagogical treatises and other sources of transmission;
  • Legacies and influence of composers or groups of composers and performers;
  • Repertoires, genres, and contexts of performance;
  • Connections with other media such as literature and art;
  • Instruments and builders;
  • Patronage and politics;
  • New perspectives or insights into le goût français.

Although the principal theme for this year’s international conference is French baroque keyboard music, proposals of presentations outside or peripheral to this theme, including contemporary repertoires and issues for historic keyboard instruments, are also welcome and will be accommodated if possible.

Available instruments include single- and double-manual harpsichords by Yves Beaupré, Willard Martin, Frank Hubbard and William Post Ross, clavichords and a fortepiano, and, on May 21 only, the French-classical organ by Hellmuth Wolff in Redpath Hall.

Submission procedure. Abstracts of no more than 400 words excluding titles must be received by 5 p.m. EST on 30 September, 2014. Only one proposal per presenter or group of presenters can be chosen.

Lecture-recital, mini-recital, and multimedia demonstration proposals must also include a sample recording, provided via internet link or as an attached MP3 file.

All proposals, whether they be for papers, lecture-recitals, mini-recitals, multimedia demonstrations, round tables or group sessions, must include short biographical statements for all presenters. Presentations should last no longer than 25 minutes.

  • Presenters must be members of HKSNA. Presenters must also register for the conference and cover their own travel and other expenses.

Presenters whose proposals are chosen will be invited to revise their abstracts for the conference program. Results will be transmitted to presenters by 30 October, 2014. Please send your proposal abstracts directly to hksna2015@gmail.com.

Programme Committee:
Frances Conover Fitch

Hank Knox

Sonia Lee

Rachelle Taylor

Lena Weman

Of special note: This year, HKSNA hosts the Ninth Aliénor International Harpsichord Composition Competition. For more details: http://historicalkeyboardsociety.org/competitions/alienor-competition/.

Forte / Piano: A Festival Celebrating Pianos in History

How have the practices of composition, performance, improvisation, and listening been informed by the piano in its long history? How have the concepts, designs, materials, and sonorous resources of pianos been entwined with musical thought and affect across time and space? Specifically, how might we resituate eighteenth-century pianos in relation to harpsichords and clavichords, account for the rapid evolution of nineteenth-century pianism, and explain (or challenge) Steinway’s perceived hegemony in the twentieth century?

The Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies invites proposals for recitals, talks and innovative presentations from performers, scholars, organologists, builders, and technicians for an international festival to be held at Cornell University on August 5–9, 2015. We particularly encourage individual and collaborative proposals that combine insights drawn from scholarship, performance, and organology and examine the ways in which pianos have generated, reflected, and modulated musical thought and behavior.

Proposals may focus on composers, performance traditions, improvisatory methods, and geographical centers of influence. Potential topics include Haydn’s keyboard music; Brahms’s piano music; the piano in early twentieth-century Paris; the piano in late eighteenth-century London; the improvisation of cadenzas, fantasias, and preludes; the standardization of piano manufacture in the context of industrialization; pedagogical institutions; the piano, bodily techniques, and the performance of gender.

The festival will feature a number of leading performers, including Tom Beghin, Kris Bezuidenhout, Malcolm Bilson, David Breitman, Penelope Crawford, Alexei Lubimov, and Andrew Willis among many others. The festival will focus on an array of historical instruments and replicas built by prominent builders. We encourage proposals that will take advantage of the opportunities these instruments afford, and will provide more specific information on request. Potential presentation formats include (but are not limited to) traditional conference papers, lecture-recitals, lecture-demonstrations, and discussion panels.

Proposals should include a 250-word description and a CV, and for performers, a sound or video recording of at least 30 minutes. The submission deadline is September 15, 2014. Proposals may be submitted online at www.westfield.org/festival

Improvisation: Educational Perspectives (1-day workshop)

Improvisation: Educational Perspectives (1 day workshop)
22nd of April
St Cecilia’s Hall
University of Edinburgh
(Admission free but booking essential)

BOOKING:  http://bit.ly/improveducation

Improvisation is taught and formally assessed in higher education institutions (HEIs) throughout the world, yet there are a number of intrinsic difficulties in teaching and assessing improvisation that may impact on the pedagogical process.  This event is a one-day workshop that will give academics and practitioners working in this area the opportunity to share ideas, practices and methods specifically related to the teaching, learning and assessment of improvisation in higher education.

The sorts of questions and topics we expect to cover include:

• What is improvisation?
• Can improvisation be taught and, if so, how?
• What scope and range can/should HEI curricula include?
• Should improvisation be assessed?  If so, how do we do this effectively?
• Is assessor subjectivity an important concern?  If so, is this more or less problematic than in traditional ‘recital’ assessment?
• Idiomatic versus ‘generic’ issues in improvisation pedagogy.
• Assessing the process of improvisation rather than the outputs.

(NB Lunch and refreshments will be provided so please be sure to inform us of any special requirements when you book [http://bit.ly/improveducation])

Speakers: 

Prof Raymond MacDonald (University of Edinburgh)

Improvisation and all that Jazz

Improvisation, as a universally accessible form of creativity, can facilitate innovative artistic collaborations that are both transdisciplinary and cross cultural. This presentation explores these unique features and also poses some key questions that are aligned with improvisation’s growing emergence within higher education. These questions include: what is improvisation; can it be taught and how can it be assessed.

Dr Michael Duch (Department of Music, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Composing Improvisation: Composed experimental music as improvisational exercises.

Can improvisation be composed and what is required of the performer? In the 1960’s experimental composers such as Cornelius Cardew and Christian Wolff made musical scores inspired by improvisation. Many of these pieces intended to diminish or blur the boundaries between composer and performer, but also between composed and improvised music.

Dr Paul Kleiman (Higher Education Academy)

Taking a Note for a Walk: Improvising assessment and assessing improvisation

Of all arts-based forms, improvisation provides a particular challenge to assessment regimes based on normative pedagogic discourses and practices. This contribution explores some of those challenges and offers some creative approaches to assessing on the edge of chaos.

Dr Zack Moir (University of Edinburgh)

‘Just like Clarence’ or ‘Just like Jimi’: Issues surrounding creativity, originality and pedagogy in pop and rock improvisation.

This presentation will begin by considering the nature of improvisation in pop and rock music with particular focus on creativity and originality.  The pedagogical implications of such issues will then be discussed by way of understanding the teaching, learning and assessment of improvisation in this idiom.

Dr Philippa Derrington (Queen Margaret University)

Making connections through improvisation in music therapy.

What is the purpose of improvisation in music therapy? How do music therapists improvise? This presentation will look at ways that improvisation is used to engage clients in interactive live music-making and how therapists are trained.