Symposium on Music, Education and Social Inclusion

London, 20th-21st July 2017

A symposium is to be held at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London on July 20th and 21st 2017 to launch the Music, Education and Social Inclusion Study Group under the auspices of the ICTM.

Founding members include musicians, senior scholars and academics from Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, North America and Asia, reflecting the multicultural nature of the collective.

Historically excluded groups such as women and girls, ethnic minorities, vulnerabilities including disabilities and other marginalities have been systematically un- or under-represented in education, reflecting wider socially discriminatory practices that in turn are perpetrated and transmitted within the school system, shaping society at large beyond schools and academic institutions.

The symposium will focus on exploring multifaceted educational practices in relation to a wider spectrum of broader issues and thinking, such as:
• Education and Representation
• Issues of Identity in Education
• Social inclusion and Education
• Education and International Development
• Ethnomusicology, Transmission Practices (teaching/learning) and Social Inclusion
Other topics that might sit well within the broader agenda are welcome and encouraged.

Papers should be 20 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes of discussion and Q&A. Abstracts should be from 200 to 250 words in length and written in English; other languages might be considered on a case-by-case basis and only where the level of English is not sufficient to express concepts fully.
Alternative presentations – other than individual papers – are welcome and length can be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. Submissions in other forms (such as video) should be no longer than 5 minutes.

In order to make participation inclusive, and aware that traveling might not be an option for many who are interested in participating, a limited number of remote presentations through Skype will be considered, so applicants are encouraged to apply even in case they might not be able to attend in person.

Deadline for submission of proposals is 20th March 2017; please submit abstracts to Keith Howard (kh@soas.ac.uk) or Sara Selleri (Sara_Selleri@soas.ac.uk). Participants will be notified by the end of April 2017.

‘I Am Not There’ International Conference on Bob Dylan

18-19 May 2017

Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, NOVA University of Lisbon.
Organization: CETAPS and CESEM

Call for Papers
(until 26 January 2017)

In 1999, Bob Dylan (b. 1941) was included in the ‘Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century’ as a “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize jury awarded Dylan a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, the artist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. The New York Times (13-10-2016) reported: “Mr. Dylan, 75, is the first musician to win the award, and his selection on Thursday is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901…In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honor, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels”. After the official Nobel announcement, opinions divided the public and critics. CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) and CESEM (Sociology and Musical Aesthetics Research Center), NOVA University of Lisbon, decided to analyze and celebrate the aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural significance of Bob Dylan’s musical, literary and artistic (visual) work, as well as its influence(s).
The initial expression in the conference’s title is the title of the biographical musical drama film I Am Not There (2007, directed by Todd Haynes and co-written with Oren Moverman), which intercuts the storylines of seven different Dylan-inspired characters. According to Haynes, “the minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that’s why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him – things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate” (apud D. Dalton, Who Is the Man?: In Search of the Real Bob Dylan, 2012).

We will privilege comparative and transdisciplinary approaches. Potential contributors are invited to submit a bionote and a 300 word abstract on themes related to any of the following conference tracks:

• Influences in/of Dylan’s music;
• Bob Dylan and awards;
• The ‘power’ of the Nobel prize for literature;
• The alter-egos and personas of Robert Zimmerman/Bob Dylan (Blind boy Grunt, Bob Landy, Tedham Porterhouse, etc.);
• Dylan’s music videos;
• Dylan in/as performance;
• Dylan and religion;
• Art, activism, protest, and social unrest;
• Dylan on stage – presence, performance and liveliness;
• Dylanesque spaces and places;
• Influences in/of Dylan’s visual art;
• Intertextuality in Dylan’s lyrics, music and videos (text-music relationship);
• Intermediality in musical genres and practices;
• Lyrics as/and poetry/literary narratives;
• Dylan depicted (visual biographies, photography, press and record [album] covers, official website);
• Dylan in cyberspace (myspace, facebook, youtube, etc);
• Dylan’s songs;
• Dylan as trend-setter;
• Musical style(s) in Dylan;
• Bob Dylan in the classroom;
• Adaptation of Dylan’s texts as children’s literature;
• Dylan in/and translation;
• Dylan’s fandom;
• Academia and Dylan’s fandom;
• Music as a social and political agent in Dylan’s and other composers’ production;
• Dylan, music and the moving image (cinema, documentary, television, internet);
• The roles and ideologies of musical, literary and artistic criticism: after Dylan;
• Gender and music;
• Listening to Dylan: social behaviors, musical taste, consumption patterns.

Working languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish. No translation will be provided.

Papers and panels on the above themes are invited. However, papers/panels on other subjects related to the above topics will also be considered. Participants will be held to a twenty minute presentation limit. Please submit an abstract and a bio note, by 05 January 2017, to the conference email:

bobdylanconferenceportugal@gmail.com

To ensure prompt notification, please include your e-mail address on your submission. If you are interested in chairing a session, please note this at the top of your abstract.
Registration fee: 80 euros. BA and MA students: 30 euros.

Conference website: https://internationalconferenceonbobdylanportugal2017.wordpress.com/

Coordination: Rogério Puga (CETAPS) e Paula Gomes Ribeiro (CESEM).

Embodied Monologues Symposium

Call for Papers and Performances

EMBODIED MONOLOGUES SYMPOSIUM — MARCH 31, 2017

MAYNOOTH UNIVERSITY, IRELAND

Deadline for Proposals: January 9, 2017

In recent years, the emergence of practice-based and performance-led research has generated dynamic, productive and provocative new forms of understanding in humanities scholarship. Knowledge and experience derived from embodied practices have done much to expand the epistemic fields centred on the body and its place in philosophy and aesthetics. Associated with these developments, topics such as voice, performativity and subjectivity have been transformed and have in turn reshaped contemporary political and social concerns, and questions of human rights, disabilities, inequality, gender, and racial and social segregation.

The emergence of movement philosophy and literature especially, as well as a greater emphasis on the performer’s body as predicated in contemporary theatre practices, has opened new pathways for research only recently applied to music performance. As the one and only dramatic figure in monologues and monodramas, the solo performer has unprecedented agency in the dramaturgy and enactment of the piece. Yet even in monodrama, a dramatic genre supposedly condensed into one stage figure, production and staging are still the result of multilayered processes and agencies.

Embodied Monologues seeks to generate responses and challenges to the idea of solo or ‘mono’ performance. What is the role of the intertextual, the multimedial, the intercorporeal in this mode of performance? According to Bakthin’s The Dialogic Imagination “the centripetal forces of the life of language, embodied in a unitary language, operate in the midst of heteroglossia”. In performance, monologues and monodramas demonstrate the dynamics of this notion, combining the individual and the collective, the solo and the dialogical in complex and revealing ways. The series will explore solo performance through practice and research across the humanities, investigating the multiple forces at work during the production and performative processes. Embodied Monologues aims to promote an interdisciplinary exchange among performers, researchers, and practitioners whose work is based primarily—however not exclusively—on solo performance.

Proposals are invited for individual papers, lecture recitals, research reports, posters, video-installations and specific sessions in any area of solo embodied or practice-led research. Deadline for abstract (maximum 300 words) and short bio (maximum 100 word) is January 9, 2017. Proposals should be uploaded at http://www.embodiedmonologues.com/

KEYNOTE EVENTS:

Catherine Laws, Senior Lecturer Department of Music University of York, Senior Research Fellow at the Orpheus Institute, Ghent (BE);

Róisín O’Gorman, Lecturer in Drama & Theatre Studies, University College Cork.

SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZER:

Francesca Placanica, Maynooth University Francesca.Placanica@nuim.ie

 

COMMITTEE:

Christopher Morris, Professor of Music, Maynooth University;

Francesca Placanica, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Maynooth University;

Benjamin Spatz, Senior Lecturer in Drama Theatre and Performance, University of Huddersfield.

 

York Conference on Church Music

Link

Monday 13 – Wednesday 15 February 2017

The planning committee of the York Conference on Church Music would like to invite you to join us on 13th-15th February 2017 in York, UK. This joint venture between the University of York and York Minster seeks to promote and heighten awareness of the academic study, composition, and practical output of church music.

Keynote speakers include Professor Bennett Zon (Durham University), Fr Peter Allan (Principal, Community of the Resurrection), Professor Jonathan Wainwright (University of York), Dr Phillip Cooke (Aberdeen University) and Dr Thomas Hyde (Oxford University), with topics including ‘The theology of Church Music’, ‘Church Music Models for the future’, ‘Girl Choristers’, ‘The Evensong Tradition’, ‘Composition for the Church’ and ‘Worldwide experiences of Church Music’. There will be the opportunity to attend Evensong at York Minster on Monday and Tuesday and to see at close hand the workings of a modern, vibrant choral foundation.

Tickets are available via our Eventbrite site at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/york-conference-on-church-music-2017-tickets-23822798632

For further information on the conference, please visit our website at http://yccm2017.webs.com/ or contact us by email at churchmusic2017@york.ac.uk

York Conference on Church Music is a joint partnership between the University of York Music Department and York Minster.

Music and Socialism since 1917

Conference supported by the Institute of Musical Research

7-8 July 2017, Department of Music, University of Nottingham

Keynote: Eric Drott (University of Texas at Austin)

‘Music and Socialism: Past, Present and Future’

 

 Convenor: Danijela Špirić-Beard (IMR Early Career Fellow, Royal Holloway)

Conference committee: Robert Adlington (University of Nottingham), Pauline Fairclough (University of Bristol), Elaine Kelly (The University of Edinburgh) and John Street (University of East Anglia)

Call for proposals

The rise of Occupy, Podemos, Syriza, Bernie Sanders and Corbynism for many indicates the emergence of twenty-first century socialism, but despite this renewed interest, the concept of socialism continues to receive little attention in musicological discourse. Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution, this conference will examine how music and socialism have been articulated at various historical and sociopolitical junctures, focusing on how composers and musicians have voiced their political engagement since 1917.

In contrast to the implicit radicalism of communism, socialism was initially championed as the more moderate and democratic means of effecting social change. The aim of this conference is to open up a dialogue between the creative and transformative inroads that socialism has made through music over the last hundred years, and the more adverse appropriation of music and socialist ideology by totalitarian regimes. The conference will challenge the semantic confusion over socialism and communism, and generate a more global understanding of socialism as an impulse that resonates beyond the Cold-War polarisation, and across many different cultures, societies and political systems.

The conference seeks to address (but is not limited to) the following themes:

– What constitutes socialist music?

– Rethinking Marx and critical theory

– Music, protest, democracy: between moral imperative and social action

– Composing socialism: mass communication and intellectual experimentation

– Rethinking music in the Cold War: towards socialist commonalities

– Pop and socialism

– Sounding socialism on screen

– Economy, capitalism and the music industry

– Music and postsocialism

– Music in socially engaged projects

– Social engagement or political commitment: liberals, radicals, progressives

– Socialist or social?

 

Submissions

We invite proposals for both individual papers and themed panels (3−4 speakers).

– Individual abstracts (250 words)

– Panels should include individual abstracts (250 words) and a short description of the proposed panel (200 words)

All proposals must include the title of the presentation/panel, author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), email contact, technical requirements and a short biography (100 words). Proposals should be sent as a word attachment to Danijela Špirić-Beard at Spiric-BeardD@cardiff.ac.uk

The deadline is 11 January 2017.

Applicants will be informed of the outcome by 15 February. Information about the conference (including accommodation and travel information) will be sent to all successful candidates by the end of February.

A conference fee of £35 will cover the cost of a conference pack, buffet lunch and refreshments on both days. A limited number of travel bursaries will be available to postgraduates and to early career researchers without institutional support.

A selection of authors will be invited to contribute to a multi-authored volume.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Language, Music, and Computing

Second International Workshop on Language, Music, and Computing

http://lmac.hf-guap.ru/ENG/index.html

Aims of the workshop: to encourage interdisciplinary communication and collaboration of linguists, musicians and IT-specialists in the sphere of some actual problems, among which are the following:
1. Language and music acquisition; influence of music skills on language acquisition and language processing; influence of linguistic skills on music acquisition; relationship between music and language training.
2. Linguistic and music knowledge, their structure and functioning; explicit and implicit knowledge of music and language; similarities and differences in understanding of music and language.
3. Automatic classification of linguistic and music knowledge; formal models of linguistic and music knowledge; musical information retrieval vs. linguistic information retrieval.

This year special topics of the workshop are:
– Formal representation of language and music: differences and similarities
– Sound corpora in music and linguistics

Keynote speakers:
Sabine Iatridou, USA
Sergi Jordà, Spain
Merryl Goldberg, USA
Elena Riekhakainen, Russia

Languages of the conference:
Russian & English (some sessions will be simultaneously translated)

Submission process:

Abstracts from different fields are warmly invited. Presentations will last 20 minutes, followed by a ten minute discussion. Abstracts should be submitted before November 27, 2016. Notification of acceptance follows on January 20, 2017. Abstracts should be 450-500 words long (without any subheadings) and clearly present a research question/aim, critical review of the literature, methodology, results and conclusions. Abstracts should be submitted as a pdf. If you wish to include any specific symbols (such as phonetic transcription), please submit your paper both in DOC and PDF format. We have the intention to select papers for a peer-reviewed special issue.
Please send each abstract both in anonymized and unanonymized forms (with author(s) and affiliation) to the following address: al@hf-guap.ru

Registration fee (includes program, coffee-breaks, post-conference publication, visa support (if needed)):
Early-bird fee (before March 15, 2017) – 2500 rubles, or 45 euros; students – 1000 rubles, or 20 euros;
regular fee (after March 15, 2017) – 3000 rubles, or 55 euros; students – 1500 rubles, or 35 euros.

Important dates:

Submission deadline: November 27, 2016
Notification of acceptance: January 20, 2017
Registration starts: February 1, 2017
Early-bird registration ends: March 15, 2017
Workshop: April 17-19, 2017
Final papers: June 1, 2017
Results of the revision process: July 25, 2017
Publication – Fall 2017

Geography, Music, Space

One-day conference, supported by the Institute of Musical Research

Wednesday 25 January 2017; Kingsley Barrett Room, Calman Learning Centre, Durham University, UK

Keynote Speaker: George Revill, The Open University

The event is free and all are welcome. Please click here to register attendance by Friday 16 December 2016.

To read the paper abstracts, please visit: https://www.dur.ac.uk/music/research/seminars16-17/geog/
For more information, contact Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk

Programme

08:30-09:00 – Registration

09:00-11:00 – Session I: The political spaces of music
Fausto di Quarto (Sociology, Bicocca University of Milan) – Reclaiming Democratic (Public) Spaces through Music: The Case of Viaduto Santa Tereza in Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

Alice Cree (Geography, Durham University) – “People want to see tears”: Gendered Military Logics, Music, and the Military Wives Choir

Jelena Gligorijević (Music, University of Turku, Finland) – The Political Potential of Contemporary Music Festivals as Micronational Spaces: Articulations of National Identity in Serbia’s Exit and Guča Trumpet Festivals After Milošević

James Williams (Music, University of Derby) – Music ‘Mash-ups’ and Social-Media Culture: How ‘Cassetteboy’ Tackles Politics in Cyberspace

June Wang (Public Policy, City University of Hong Kong) – Practicing Music, Practicing Musical City: Spatial Politics of Chinese Rock in Shenzhen

11:00-11:20 – Coffee

11:20-13:00 – Session II: Music and everyday space making
Maria Lindmäe (Geography, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona) – The Impact of Collective Practice of Music on Young People’s Behaviour Towards their Everyday Environment: A Case Study in Medellín

Jasmine Hornabrook (Music, Goldsmiths, University of London) – Music and Everyday Space-making in London’s Tamil Diaspora

Gretchen Larsen (Business School, Durham University) & Maurice Patterson (Business School, University of Limerick) – Creolized Sonic Ecologies: Sound, Space and Consumer Subjectivities in New Orleans

James Armstrong (Music, University of Surrey) – Person-Environment Relationships: Influences beyond Acoustics in Musical Performance

13:00-14:00 – Lunch (includes film screening):
Candice Boyd (Geography, University of Melbourne) – Musical Improvisation as Therapeutic Practice: A Short Film

14:00-15:40 – Session III: Performance spaces: hearing, playing, feeling
Jonathan Hicks (Music, King’s College London) – Tunnel Hearing

Arran Calvert (Social Anthropology, University of St Andrews) – Can You Hear the Architecture?

Lucy Dearn & Sarah Price (Music, University of Sheffield) – Performance Spaces and Listeners: Understanding Two Regional Concert Halls

Emily Falconer (Sociology, University of Westminster) – In Harmony or Out of Tune? Affective and Emotional Geographies of All-Male Choirs

15:40-16:00 – Coffee

16:00-17:15 – Keynote Lecture
George Revill (Geography, The Open University)


[original CFP follows]

One-day conference supported by the Institute of Musical Research

25 January 2017, Durham University

CFP Deadline: 15 September 2016

 

Keynote speaker: George Revill, The Open University

 

How does music shape diverse spaces, such as an immigration detention centre, a street performance, a military wives’ choir, or a family kitchen? Is there common ground to be found between researching the chants of a protest marcher, the beats of a commuter’s headphones and a soloist’s concert hall recital? What is the role of music in the construction of space, and vice versa? How and why do we research this?

 

This one-day conference will explore the relationship between space and how music is expressed, circulated and politicised to construct particular identities. It will also examine music at a non-representational level, with meaning emerging through affect and emotion, folded through a variety of embodied and spatially situated experiences. In short, it will consider the nuanced interplay between music and space.

 

The conference aims to bring together scholars working at the intersection of music and space, not only within the areas of musicology, ethnomusicology and geography, but also as approached from a variety of other disciplinary backgrounds (including politics, sociology, anthropology, philosophy). We especially encourage contributions from Postgraduates and Early Career Researchers.

 

20-minute papers addressing, but not limited to, the following themes are welcomed:

 

Music, materiality and space

– How is the materiality of music (a longitudinal wave; the materials that constitute a live performance; a recording on CD or mp3 file) significant in the construction of space?

– What does the material form that music takes bring to its circulation, governance and reception?

 

Music, the everyday and space

How do the materialities of music (or the sonic) fold through the multiple spaces of the everyday?

– In which social contexts are music and space mutually constitutive (performance, work, leisure)?

– What does a privileging of music bring to understanding the everyday? What other actors should be considered?

 

Music, the body and space

– How are spatialized identities formed through embodied acts of music such as singing, playing, and performing?

– How does music play into the construction of gendered bodies?

 

Music, the political and space

– What role does music have within contested, highly politicised spaces?

– What new spaces for politics open up through the circulation of music?

– How can we conceptualise the politics of music beyond textual analysis?

 

Researching music and space

– What methodological challenges and interdisciplinary opportunities arise from researching music and space?

– What does it mean to ‘do’ geographies of music?

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk

Deadline: 15 September 2016

 

Successful applicants will be notified by the end of September. A limited number of travel bursaries will be available to Postgraduates or Early Career Researchers (those within three years of completing their PhD).

Brian Boydell Centenary Conference

Call For Papers: Brian Boydell Centenary Conference
Friday 23 – Saturday 24 June 2017
The Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin
CFP Deadline: Friday 3 February 2017

Contact: boydell100@gmail.com

Born in Dublin in 1917, Brian Boydell was one of Ireland’s major 20th century composers. As a musicologist, he published seminal research on music in 18th century Dublin. As a broadcaster, performer, adjudicator, public lecturer, an often outspoken agitator for music, singing teacher, Professor of Music at Trinity College Dublin, one of the founders of the Music Association of Ireland and long-time member of the Arts Council, his influence on music and music education in Ireland was significant. An honorary DMus of the National University of Ireland (1974) and Fellow of the Royal Irish Academy of Music (1990), he was elected to Aosdána, the affiliation of creative artists in Ireland, in 1984.

To mark his centenary, a conference will be held on Friday 23/Saturday 24 June 2017 in The Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, with a recital of his music in the Royal Irish Academy of Music, to re-evaluate his contributions to Irish musical, artistic and academic life, and their place within the wider contexts of musical, cultural and artistic developments in Ireland in the 20th century. Confirmed speakers are Professor Barra Boydell, who will give a special address, and Peter Murray, Director of the Crawford Art Gallery Cork, who will present a guest lecture on Brian Boydell’s paintings.

Proposals are invited for the following:

  • Individual papers
  • Joint papers (maximum 2 speakers)
  • Lecture recitals
  • Themed sessions
  • Panel discussions (up to a maximum of 6 speakers)

Proposal details:

All proposals should be submitted as one file in Microsoft Word or PDF format:

Individual papers of 20 minutes in duration followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals should include:

  • title of paper
  • abstract of no more than 250 words
  • name, contact details and affiliation
  • a brief biography (max. 100 words)
  • any technical requirements

Joint papers of 20 minutes in duration followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals should include:

  • overall title of presentation and abstract (max. 150 words)
  • titles of individual papers
  • individual abstracts of no more than 250 words
  • names, contact details and affiliations
  • a brief biography for each presenter (max. 100 words)
  • any technical requirements

Lecture recitals of 30 minutes (including performance) followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals should include:

  • overall title of lecture recital and abstract/proposal of no more than 250 words
  • name(s), contact detail(s) and affiliation(s)
  • a brief biography for each presenter (max. 100 words)
  • any technical requirements

Themed sessions of 90 minutes (3 papers) or 120 minutes (4 papers) including questions and discussion, and Panel discussions of 90 minutes (up to a max. of 6 speakers, each presenting a position paper followed by questions and discussion). Proposals should include:

  • overall title of presentation and abstract/proposal (max. 250 words)
  • titles of individual papers and abstracts of no more than 250 words
  • name, contact details and affiliation of convenor
  • names, contact details and affiliations of proposed presenters
  • a brief biography for the session/panel convenor and each proposed presenter (max. 100 words each)
  • any technical requirements

Deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 3 February 2017.

All proposals should be submitted as a Microsoft Word or PDF attachment to Dr Barbara Jillian Dignam by email at boydell100@gmail.com It is envisaged that notification of the conference committee’s decision will be communicated by March 2017. A conference website will be launched shortly.

Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) Brian Boydell’s contributions under any of the following areas:

  • the re-examination and assessment of his compositions – individually and collectively – and their place within Irish music of the 20th century and the wider context
  • his musicology and other writings
  • his work as a performer: conductor of the Dublin Orchestral Players for over twenty years, founder and director of the Dowland Consort, singer, oboist, and occasional conductor of the Radio Éireann/RTÉ Symphony Orchestra
  • his teaching, professorship at TCD, public lectures, adjudicating at music festivals and numerous radio and television broadcasts
  • as agitator for music, through the Music Association of Ireland, the Arts Council, Forás Éireann and other bodies to which he contributed
  • his place within the wider context of Irish artistic and cultural life in the 20th century

Brian Boydell’s papers, including his original scores, musical notebooks, radio broadcast scripts, and his extensive correspondence with musicians, musical and cultural bodies, and others covering many decades in Irish musical life, are held in the library of Trinity College Dublin and remain a largely untapped resource. The Contemporary Music Centre also holds copies of his scores. His work as an artist in the early 1940s before he devoted himself fully to music were highlighted in the recent exhibition ‘The Language of Dreams’ at the Crawford Art Gallery, Cork. See also Gareth Cox, Axel Klein and Michael Taylor (eds.) The life and music of Brian Boydell (2004), and the Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland (EMIR).

Conference committee:

Prof. Barra Boydell, Dr Barbara Jillian Dignam (Chair, Maynooth University), Dr Kerry Houston (DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama), Roy Stanley (Trinity College Dublin), Marie Moran (Royal Irish Academy of Music), Dr Gareth Cox (Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick)

For further information on the conference, submission process or any other queries, please contact the conference committee chair, Dr Barbara Jillian Dignam, at boydell100@gmail.com

Also follow our conference posts on Twitter https://twitter.com/Boydell100 and Facebook https://www.facebook.com/boydell100/

International Conference of Young Musicologists. Young Musicology Today: tendencies, challenges and perspectives

The aim of the conference is to integrate the musicological community through the creation of an international forum for exchanging ideas and research experiences. We encourage young musicologists to present results from ongoing studies and to engage in discussion on the future of musicology, its role and place in the contemporary culture. Currently, musicology, which is not only the study of music, is starting to perform social functions, becoming not only a field of scientific inquiry but one of use to society. During the conference, we would like to consider new avenues of research, new methodologies of musicologists’ work, and the challenges and career prospects faced by musicologists entering the labour market. It will also be an opportunity to consider the subject areas of interest to young musicology.

Subject areas for consideration include

  • New research perspectives in musicology
  • Music versus other arts
  • Music in the public space (sonosphere research)
  • Music in society (music and ideologies)
  • Music and the sacred
  • Music and science (e.g. psychology of music)
  • Challenges of modern ethnomusicology
  • The state and the form of contemporary music criticism
  • Source studies and music editing
  • Music librarianship – issues and challenges
  • Performance practice
  • Theory of music
  • Music and pop culture
  • Opera nowadays

The conference will incorporate both traditional lectures and panel discussions, during which groups of researchers conducting a joint project or studying similar subjects will be able to present the results of their studies or discuss a specific subject. We encourage the participants to organise their own panel sessions during the conference (due to time constraints, we suggest no more than four papers during one session; please indicate the person leading the session during registration).

In addition, the conference programme includes:

  • “A musicologist on the labour market” panel

This will be an opportunity for an in-depth discussion of the current employment situation of musicology graduates in Poland and abroad, and for the presentation of experiences in this area. We encourage participation in this panel session by musicologists – musical life animators, employees of media and cultural and educational associations and institutions etc.

  • Masters’ lectures (plenary speakers)
  • The conference programme includes additional events, such as concerts, sightseeing in Krakow, and exhibitions.

A publication of the collected papers presented at the conference is also planned.

Conference language: English.

Schedule

  • Accepting applications with abstracts – until 31th of May 2016.
  • Information about accepted papers – by 30 June 2016.
  • Conference dates: 7-9 November 2016.

Applications should be made by sending the application form via email to: agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl  and musicologytoday@gmail.com

You can find an application form here.

For any further information please feel free to contact: Agnieszka Lakner; agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl

Conference fee

Conference fee: 200,00 PLN / 50 €

The fee includes:

Admission to the conference, conference program, publication of the paper in the conference proceedings, lunches and coffee breaks during sessions and conference attractions such as sightseeing and concerts. Registration fee does not include accommodation and transportation. If you wish, Organizers will help you to book an accommodation.

Organizer

Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Department of Musicology

Address: Westerplatte Street 10; 31-033 Kraków, Poland

www.muzykologia.uj.edu.pl

 

 

Music for Liturgy and Devotion in Italy around 1600

Conference, Friday 4th November and Saturday 5th November 2016,
Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama, The University of Manchester

Keynote speakers:
Daniele V. Filippi (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis)
Noel O’Regan (Edinburgh College of Art)

New deadline for proposals: 4 September 2016

The decades around the turn of the seventeenth century were marked by a new religious self-consciousness developing within the Catholic world over the course of the latter part of the sixteenth century – usually associated with the Council of Trent and the Counter-Reformation but in fact fuelled by a great diversity of intellectual and religious currents which continue to fuel discussions among historians. Italy, besides being one of the main centres of the Catholic world, was home to an extremely rich musical culture, witnessing in the time around 1600 a huge variety of musical styles designated or adapted to enhance the practice of the faith. Large-scale polychoral works for the Tridentine liturgy existed side-by-side with the more intimate genres of musica spirituale which occasionally straddled the stylistic and functional boundaries to the secular realm.

Fascinatingly diverse, this repertoire has long offered a fruitful field of research for musicologists. However, given its chronological situation in a period transgressing the traditional epochal definitions, study of this music has struggled to find a ‘home’ in the standard historiographical discourse, resulting in a perceivable lack of opportunity for researchers working in this area to communicate their knowledge. This conference aims to respond to this need and to act as a forum of exchange for scholars working on Italian liturgical and devotional music in the decades around 1600.

We welcome proposals for papers in English of 20 minutes duration or performance workshops of 30 minutes. The proposals should include the title, an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biography (approx. 100 words). The extended deadline is 4 September 2016. Applicants will be notified by 15 September.

Submissions should be emailed to italianmusic1600@manchester.ac.uk

Inquiries can be directed to Rosemarie Darby and Ginte Medzvieckaite through the contact form on the conference website www.italianmusic1600.weebly.com or using the email address given above.