RMA Study Day: Music, Media and Technologies

Royal Musical Association Study Day
20 May 2017, Durham University, UK

Keynote speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)

View the full programme and registration form. All are welcome to attend:

For more information please contact Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk

Papers:

Daniel Gouly – The affordances of digital music tools in theory and practice

Alex Stevenson (Leeds Beckett University) – Digital aesthetics in contemporary popular music performance

Bridget Coulter (University of Sheffield) – Authenticity and auto-tune: technology and the construction of vocal ‘naturalness’ in popular music

Nigel Martin (University of Derby) – Interpreting recontextualised guitar in contemporary popular music practice

Danielle Beverly (Northwestern University in Qatar) – Analog artifacts in the Middle East: music, memory, materiality, movement

Stephen Wilford (City, University of London) – “This is just a band”: music, representation and digital technologies in the Middle East and North Africa

Safa Canalp (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) – Towards a notion of subcultural transfer: circulation of media, and hierarchies of knowledge, taste and behavior

Tat Amaro (Durham University) – Shaping the past, surviving the future: computer karaoke in contemporary piphat music-making in Phayao province, northern Thailand

Karlyn King (University of Birmingham) – Vinyl records vs digital ephemera: does the medium of music matter?

Anne-Marie Beaumont & Aglaia Foteinou (University of Wolverhampton) – Back to the future: auralization and its application in musical analysis

Elizabeth Hunt (University of Liverpool) – Video games live and the gamification of the symphony orchestra

Kate Mancey (University of Liverpool) – The hidden soundtrack: music making in Rez Infinite


[original CFP follows]

Music, Media and Technologies

RMA Study Day, Durham University, UK
Saturday 20 May 2017

Keynote Speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)
Call for Papers deadline: 3 March 2017

How do media and technology shape music-making, music experience, and music meaning? What contemporary and historical developments in these fields influence how music (of any kind) can be understood? How has music played a role in shaping wider media and technology environments?

This study day aims to attract scholars from across music’s sub-disciplines interested in analysing the significance of media and technologies in the production, dissemination and experience of music.

Research areas might include (but are not limited to) both contemporary and historical approaches to musicology, analysis, ethnomusicology, music technology, psychology, education, composition and performance. There are no restrictions on musical genres, eras, or research approaches.

Contributions from postgraduate students and Early Career Researchers are especially welcome.

The study day will be free for Royal Musical Association (RMA) and Durham University Music Department members. There will be a fee of £10 for non-members.

All papers will be of 20-minutes duration. Please send abstracts of up to 300 words.

For enquiries or to submit an abstract, please email Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk.
Deadline for receipt of abstracts: Friday 3 March 2017.

The following themes are of particular interest:

Media and technologies in music production:
– Musical instruments and creative tools
– Wider technologies around creation and live music-making
– Recording and the studio

The influences of technologies at the moments of inspiration, creation and live performance in music of any kind. These may be central to the production of sound (musical instruments, creative tools) or have a less direct impact (technologies bringing together musicians and listeners, technologies of the physical or media spaces for music-making). These themes might be approached from analytical, historical or social perspectives, as well as those of creative practice.

Media and technologies in music dissemination:
– Film, broadcast, and music industries
– New media (historical or contemporary perspectives)
– Media of music learning

The roles of media and technologies in how music is spread and encountered. Focuses may include the impacts of commercialisation and the proliferation of new media (from both historical and contemporary perspectives) upon the processes and products involved in learning and sharing music. They might be explored through analysis of both musical texts and wider social contexts.

Media and technologies in music experience:
– Technologies of listening and music’s integration into everyday life
– Issues of genre, transnationalism and cultural hybridity
– Impacts upon identities, politics and communities

The effects of media and technologies in music’s broader involvements and uses. Focus here may fall on audiences, listeners, amateurs and communal music-makers, for whom music is integrated into wider life through media and technologies. Suggested areas of exploration include impacts upon global music flows, and the shaping of communal and individual experiences with music.