Financing Music in Europe from the 18th to the Early 20th Century

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca, in collaboration with Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice, is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Financing Music in Europe from the 18th to the Early 20th Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 16 to 18 October 2020.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Katharine Ellis (University of Cambridge)
  • Yannick Simon (Université de Rouen Normandie)

The ways in which music was financed from the 18th to the early 20th centuries has usually been depicted as a slow transition from private investment (or patronage) to more public forms of financial support. In particular, the later 18th and earlier 19thcenturies marked fundamental changes in European life with the development of new technologies and expanding market economies.

Composers and musicians, no longer bound by service to a court or a patron, were fully integrated into the musical market, and new categories emerged, such as theatre impresarios and the artistic agent. During the second half of the 19th century, the concept of a career as a concert musician began to take shape concurrently with the second Industrial Revolution.

This conference aims to investigate the various aspects of financing the music world and welcomes studies focusing on the way that individual agents, private structures or public institutions (from cities to states) invested in the musical lives of their time.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The Long History of Patronage: Persistence and Evolution of an Economic Model
  • The Relationships between Composers and Their Sponsor(s)
  • Concert Management: Private and Public Investment, Subscriptions and Societies
  • The Musician as Entrepreneur: How Musicians (composers and instrumentalists) Financed their Activities
  • Musical Impresarios during the 19th Century
  • Organization, Management and Financing of Opera Houses
  • Funding and Management of Music Schools
  • Politics of Encouraging the Development of Musical Life
  • How European Countries financed Music
  • The Return on Investment: What do patrons or institutions expect when they finance musicians? How do they control the way(s) that their money is spent?

Programme Committee:

  • Katharine Ellis (University of Cambridge)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Yannick Simon (Université de Rouen Normandie)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 15 March 2020*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of March 2020, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Music and Science from Leonardo to Galileo

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniin Lucca is pleased to invite submissions for the symposium «Music and Science from Leonardo to Galileo», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 13 to 15 November 2020. The conference is dedicated to bringing together new scholarship dealing with the relationships between music and science from the late fifteenth to the early seventeenth century.

The relationship between music and science is particularly close during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and both fields develop and thrive through their often confrontational relationship with patronage, the church, and between theory and practice. During Antiquity and the Middle Ages, music was one of the artes liberales,the inverse proportionality between string length and pitch understood as a model for relationships between art and science. In the modern era, musical sound (and acoustics) has had implications for both music and physics.

Between these two epochs is the period spanning the work of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), in which a scholastic deference to authority, tradition, and theory was being replaced by knowledge derived from observation, experiment, and practice. During this century, new paradigms were developed not only in mathematics, mechanics and astronomy — creating what is commonly known as the as the Scientific Revolution — but also in religion, politics, and other fields of human endeavor.

It was during this time period that the relationship between music and science was newly defined. In addition to Leonardo and Galileo’s vivid interest in music, many of their fellow scientists also shared this interest. On the other hand, many musicians, music theorists and composers were interested in science and explored the possibility of relating music to science.

Proposals for papers are invited that address the relationship between musical and scientific topics during this period ranging from philosophy of music, tuning and temperament systems, instrument construction, patronage, biography, the impact of science on musical composition, and new work on such figures as Leonardo, Galileo, Huygens, Mersenne, and others.We welcome proposals for single papers, as well as panels of two, three or four contributions.

Programme Committee:

  • Victor Coelho (Boston University)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Rudolf Rasch (Utrecht University)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Victor Coelho (Boston University)
  • Rudolf Rasch (Utrecht University)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume in the series “Music, Science and Technology” (Brepols Publishers, Turnhout).

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words along with  a 150-word biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than Sunday29 March 2020 to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April, 2020, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Music and Resistance

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca, in collaboration with the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (I+D+i RTI2018-093436-B-I00 “Music and Dance in Sociocultural, Identity and Political Processes during the Second Francoism and the Democratic Transition (1959-1978)”), is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music and Resistance», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 11 to 13 December 2020.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Mark Andrew Le Vine (University of California Irvine)
  • Germán Gan Quesada (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

The word “resistance” is often associated with the wars that marked the history of the twentieth century. The music of “resistance” found a huge space in popular music, but also in celebratory and protest works with which many composers reacted to the violence of dictatorship.
But in a broader sense, the word resistance is also used in modern forms of musical art in association with anti-fascist themes, or linked to social rights movements (women, LGBT movements) and ethnic groups, or as a means of generational identity (such as punk, hip-hop or rap).

This symposium aims to engage with all forms of resistance that have been put into practice through various musical forms, styles and genres, both historical and contemporary. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • Music under Wars and Dictatorships
  • Music and Holocaust
  • Popular Music and Rebellion
  • Music and Racism
  • Music and Human Rights
  • Music and Social Critique
  • Music and the Ideologies (including Music and Feminism)
  • Music and Socio-Political Associations
  • Music at the Margins of Official Cultures, Subcultures and Countercultures
  • Young Music and Resistance
  • Concerts, Recitals and Festivals as Spaces of Resistance
  • Music and Critical Theory
  • Music and Old and New Fascisms
  • Music and Resistance in the Market and in the Cultural Industry

Programme Committee:

  • Germán Gan Quesada (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Mark Andrew Le Vine (University of California Irvine)
  • Gemma Perez Zalduondo (Universidad de Granada)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 26 April 2020*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2020, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

‘Women Are not Born to Compose’: Female Musical Works from 1750 to 1950

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca, in collaboration with Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice, is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «‘Women Are not Born to Compose’: Female Musical Works from 1750 to 1950», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 27 to 29 November 2020.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Mariateresa Storino (Conservatorio di Musica ‘G. Rossini’, Pesaro)
  • Susan Wollenberg (Oxford University)

The conference aims to investigate the music and the role of women composers from 1750 to 1950. From the second half of the 18th century women composers began to participate more actively in musical life. They were also often virtuosos of instruments and/or excellent singers, and teachers as well as founders of music schools.

Although the value of their works may already have been recognised during their own time (though with critical reception that might be unhelpfully gender-inflected), women composers and their works were routinely forgotten after their death.

The growing corpus of musicological literature, together with scholarly editions of music, produced in the late 19th and first half of the 20th century largely ignored these women and their works. In recent  decades the new perspectives in musicology have restored the presence of women composers to the history of music, and their works have begun to receive the analytical attention they deserve.

This conference focuses on the various aspects of women’s work as composers,with particular reference to somefundamental questions: when, where, what, why, how and for whom did they compose?

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • Gender and genre: women composersand musical genres
  • Women composers’ impacton the development of musical forms and genres
  • Analytical andhermeneutic approaches to women’s music
  • Virtuosity
  • Women composersand their self-beliefin the context of contemporary views on female creativity
  • Reflections on women composers’ position in the history of music
  • The critical reception of women’sworks
  • ‘Heroines of the Risorgimento’: music as a means of conveyingpatriotic and liberal ideals in women’sworks
  • Social expectations and possibilities of professional training for women composers
  • Women composers’ writings about their music (and that of others)
  • How has the social status of women composers been changing along with the transformation of the socio-cultural context?

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Mariateresa Storino (Conservatorio di Musica ‘G. Rossini’, Pesaro)
  • Susan Wollenberg (Oxford University)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 5 April 2020*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2020, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Music, Cinema, and Modernism. The Works and Heritage of Kurt Weill between Europe and America

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and the DAMS/Università di Torino are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music, Cinema, and Modernism. The Works and Heritage of Kurt Weill between Europe and America», to be held at the  Università degli studi di Torino, Palazzo Nuovo, Via Sant’Ottavio, 20 – Torino, from 22 to 24 May 2020.

Keynote Speakers

  • Nils Grosch (Universität Salzburg)
  • Stephen Hinton (Stanford University)

The conference aims to address aspects of Kurt Weill’s works in relation to his contemporaries and his heritage to succeeding generations, both in the United States and in Europe. The creative activities of the German-American composer have been characterized by his keen interest in new media: principally, in radio in Germany and in the cinema in the United States, and in new forms of experimentation in musical theater on both sides of the Atlantic.

The fact that his compositions as well as his sensibilities tended to situate themselves somewhere between the poles of highbrow and the lowbrow culture allows for multiple interpretations, while prompting various possible themes for research. The themes suggested here are not intended to be restrictive but, rather, to invite a wide range of reflections, and other topics are also welcome:

  • The modernity of Kurt Weill: borrowings and assimilations among his contemporaries
  • After 1950: the theoretical and aesthetic legacy of Kurt Weill after his death
  • Kurt Weill’s german-american contemporaries: aesthetic, artistic, and compositional choices
  • Marc Blitzstein as a translator and interpreter of the German Weill in the United States
  • Love Life on Broadway: a new musical theater genre is born?
  • Musicals, American opera, Radio Opera and so on: the ideas about musical theater by Kurt Weill
  • The debates for and against modernism among German émigré composers to the United States  before and after World War II
  • Aesthetic and theoretical debates concerning film music between the 1920s and 1940s
  • Film music as “modern music”: identity and perspectives
  • Kurt Weill and Hollywood: New Music for the Cinema?
  • Composer and arranger: new roles and new relationships
  • Berlin, Broadway, and Hollywood: a comparison of their modes of organization and cultural production

Programme Committee

  • Giaime Alonge (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Giulia Carluccio (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Tim Carter (University of North Carolina)
  • Pietro Cavallotti (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca)
  • Kim Kowalke (Eastman School of Music/ University of Rochester – The Kurt Weill Foundation for Music)
  • Andrea Malvano (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Ilario Meandri (università degli studi di Torino)
  • Marida Rizzuti (Università IULM, Milano)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 16 February 2020*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of February 2020, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Beethoven the European

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca, in collaboration with Ad Parnassum. A Journal of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Instrumental Music, is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Beethoven the European», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 27 to 29 March 2020.

Keynote Speakers:
Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)
William Kinderman (University of California, Los Angeles)

Beethoven’s impact is widely recognised as of seemingly universal, timeless significance; 250 years since his birth his music still communicates with and inspires people across the globe. Nevertheless his iconic, enduring oeuvre stems from a specific European cultural milieu and historical context. To what extent does the tension between the universality and particularity of Beethoven’s music give rise to a richer understanding of his music and its reception history?
Beethoven’s creative inspiration was nurtured in the European context of revolution and political reshaping, at the aesthetic turning-point from Enlightenment to Romanticism, and at the social turning-point from largely private patronage to a more market-orientated environment for composers.

Born in the German Rhineland and resident in Bonn and Vienna, he travelled little compared with contemporaries such as Mozart and Clementi, but his reputation quickly spread much further, to far-off countries such as Britain and Russia. His works attest to strong musical and ideological ties with France and England, and his stage works engage with scenarios in Spain, Hungary, the Netherlands and Greece, while his vocal works include settings in Latin, Italian, French, English and other languages as well as German. Beethoven’s intellectual outlook even extended beyond Europe, especially to Indian sources, reflecting European intellectual currents of his time. Clearly there is still much to discover about the way in which Beethoven’s music was both influenced by and in turn influenced European culture, as well as about the way Beethoven as a European has been perceived and interpreted in a wider context.

Our conference aims to explore the multivalent connections between Beethoven and Europe through multifaceted study of the music both in a European and, where relevant, a wider global multi-cultural context. We would encourage consideration of the theme through the intermingling of and interface between topics and sub-disciplines, text and music, analysis and interpretation, genesis and reception. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics related to the concept of ‘Beethoven and Europe’ are also welcome:

  • The European as complement or contrast to the Universal nature of Beethoven’s musical and/or personal identity
  • Connections with the forms, styles and influences of particular European countries or cultures
  • Setting of, and interest in texts in different languages
  • Dramatic works and their relation to historical contexts
  • Political attitudes reflected in works or words
  • Beyond Europe’s boundaries: Beethoven and Asia
  • Reception across Europe and in countries related to Europe
  • Historic performance as a means of understanding context, and as a basis for modern performance
  • Innovative analyses, sketch studies and reinterpretation of sources as a way to explore issues of the universal and particular
  • Dispersal of source material across European libraries and collections

Programme Committee:

  • Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • William Kinderman (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Malcolm Miller (The Open University, UK)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 13 October 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of October 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

 

Music Patronage in Italy from the 15th- to the 18th- Century

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music Patronage in Italy from the 15th- to the 18th- Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 16 to 18 November 2019.

During the Renaissance and throughout the Baroque and Classical periods, musical production is linked to patronage. Predominantly in the courts – ecclesiastical or secular – the ‘patron’ is a rich person, usually noble, who offers protection and money in exchange for a service. The musician s work on commission, in keeping with the requests of their patrons. Although the artists of the referred period managed to express themselves in works of excellent craftsmanship , it is undeniable that the system repressed or at least channelled their creativity. There is in fact a master-servant relationship between patrons and salaried workers and, although the exposure to each other was close and often collaborative, it is inappropriate to think of an equal relationship.

There are essentially two types of patronage. The first relates to political institutions, to public life, and aims to promote musical events that highlight the wealth and power of the patron in the eyes of rival courts and subjects – hence the birth of the court chapels. The second type belongs to the private sphere, in which the patron, of noble birth and as such in possession of high moral and intellectual virtues, possesses a discriminating artistic sensibility — hence the promotion of chamber music activities, the collecting of rare and valuable musical instruments, and the compilation and collection of musical manuscripts, possibly in deluxe or personalized copies .

This musical production system, as described, lasted until the middle of the nineteenth century, when the advent of capitalism and the rise of the bourgeois class caused the decline of patronage. Musical activity then began to obey the laws of the marketplace, with substantial repercussions on the social status of the musician and his work.

This conference focuses on the various aspects of music patronage in Italy from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

– Patronage and institutions

– The private sphere of patronage

– Music Patronage and the Church

– Patronage and musical genres

– Patronage and censorship

– The patronage system and the social status of the musician

– Patronage and musical print

– Patronage and manuscript production

– Patronage and musical collecting

Programme Committee: 

• Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

• Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

• Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynotes Speakers:

Iain Fenlon (University of Cambridge)

Reinhard Strohm (University of Oxford)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 14 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

http://www.luigiboccherini.org

Music in the Disruptive Era: The Digital, the Internet and Beyond

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

14-16 December 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music in the Disruptive Era: The Digital, the Internet and Beyond», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 14 to 16 December 2019.

The conference aims to investigate the role of the Web and how all the tools related to it have changed the way we learn, approach ourselves and experience music. What are the new forms of music production and consumption through the web? And how has the way we learn music changed? Are new genres and creative processes born? How has the Web influenced the music market? And what are the new types of jobs in music making? Can Music professionalism survive the digital wilderness? Finally, the conference intends to investigate the development of increasingly effective tools useful for musicological research, such as, for instance, the dissemination of historical sources and updated archives, as well as online scientific literature and databases.The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas,although other topics are also welcome: 

  • New Forms of Music Production, Consumption and Reception through the Web
  • New Genres and Creative Processes
  • Musical Discoveries and Knowledge through the Web
  • The Web and Music Education
  •  Music and Liquid Modernity 
  • Music and the Digital Divide
  • The Web and the Music Market
  • New Kinds of Jobs in Music
  • The Web and Research in Music
  • Music Criticism and the Web
  • Sources, Libraries and the Web
  • The Web and Music Publishing
  • Impacts of Digital Media on Musical Performance and Programming
  • The Web, Music Copyright and other Legal Issues
  • Visualizing Music: Defining the Online Experience

Programme Committee

  • David Hurwitz (ClassicsToday.com)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Pedro Ordoñez Eslava (University of Granada)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynotes Speakers:

  • Georgina Born (University of Oxford)
  • Christine Hine (University of Surrey)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume. 

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography. 

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 5 May 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date. 

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala 

conferences@luigiboccherini.org 

www.luigiboccherini.org

Popular songs in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

LUCCA, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

30 November – 2 December 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Popular songs in the 19th Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 30 November to 2 December 2019.

Even if its manifestation differs within the cultural areas in which it appears, the vogue of “popular song” seems to become a transnational phenomenon around the years 1820-1830. Following a period of political affirmation and education via the use of songs (during the French Revolution), this repertoire draws on traditional songs that, although often older (sometimes as old as the fifteenth century), are revived. The political and esthetic purposes of these productions remain to be investigated on a european scale.

The aim of this conference is multifaceted: from the investigation of the history of the nineteenth-century song from the beginning of the century up to the First World War, through evaluation and assessment of the repertoire, of the public and of the performance venues, to the isolation and identification of points of contact between different cultures from a global geographical perspective (Francophone, English-speaking, German, Italian, Spanish).

The possible answers to the essential question ‘What is popular song?’ acquire a central role in this context, since they concern not only its physical manifestations–the circumstances and places of performance of this repertoire–but also its meaning and significance: how the repertoire itself reflects the society of its origins.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The Definition of “Popular Song” in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Literary Sources of the Repertoire
  • Musical Influences on the Repertoire
  • The Different Genres of Popular Song
  • Authors, Performers and Public
  • The Types of Entertainment Venues
  • The Production System of the Song in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Geography of the Song in Urban Spaces
  • Dissemination Through Editions, Press, etc.
  • The Cultural and Social Role of Popular Song

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Derek Scott (University of Leeds)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 28 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the half of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

18-20 October 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Veniceare pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19thCentury», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 18 to 20 October 2019.

It is only in recent years that musicology has seriously begun to focus on opera staging, representing as it does a crucial element in our understanding of theatrical production. The visual component is integral to the compositional process of opera; it is already present in the stage directions contained in scene booklets and scores, before finding its ultimate form in the most comprehensive examples of stage-booklets. Cross-comparison of these books with the score, sets, costumes and press reports, often accompanied by illustrations and photographs of the scenery, can now generate an understanding of the ‘three-dimensionality’ of a particular opera.

The present conference aims to address several facets of the artistic expression of a live performance, in particular focusing on the technical issues, people and institutions related to it. Thus dance, musical theatre, mime, puppetry, and other performing arts will be investigated through the lens of their various components— staging, lighting, sound, costumes, theatrical machines — as well as their protagonists — impresarios, tournée, companies, designers, conductors and directors.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • Stage Machinery: Scene Changes, Lighting, Sound Effects, Set, Illusions, etc.
  • Economical and Administrative Issues
  • Companies and Tournées
  • Stage Direction, Movements and Gestures
  • Impresarios, Actors, Dancers, Designers, Conductors, etc.
  • Mime, Puppetry, Dance and Choreography
  • The Venues of Entertainment
  • Press, Staging Manuals, Literature and Handbooks

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Scott Palmer (School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds)
  • Catrina Flint (Vanier College, Montréal).

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 7 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org