Blog

Decolonising the musical university

University of Edinburgh, 23-24 July 2020
https://www.ed.ac.uk/edinburgh-college-art/reid-school-music/decolonising-musical-university
Twitter: @decol_music

Call for participation

We invite researchers, educators and activists to join us in July 2020 to participate in the process of decolonising the musical university.

Decolonisation is the disruption and dismantling of colonial structures and behaviours. As such, in this meeting too, we would like to disrupt some of the formats of academic practice and prioritise more inclusive ways of working.

Our main aims as organisers are to facilitate, and make space for, marginalised colleagues, and to encourage more privileged colleagues to listen and to reflect on how colonial ideologies continue to influence teaching, learning and research.

Please note that, therefore, this is a call for participation, not a call for papers: the event will not be based around presentation of papers

Our plan as organisers is to create a tailored and pragmatic programme of activities for conference participants based on the interests of those who wish to attend, working in formats suggested by participants.
This is because we want this gathering to produce meaningful changes in practice and thinking that have real-life impact on current and prospective staff and students involved in music in universities.
We particularly welcome participation of those who are marginalised in the arts, society and academia, especially BIPOC.

Please send your expression of interest to participate in ‘Decolonising the Musical University’ by 23:59 GMT on Sunday 15 December 2019.
Submissions should be made by email to decol_music@ed.ac.uk<mailto:decol_music@ed.ac.uk>
This expression of interest should outline your areas of work/interest, and proposed topics of discussion you would like to bring to the table.
Submit your expression of interest as a written document of no more than 300 words, or a voice note of up to three (3) minutes.
Please include your name, location and organisation/institution/role where relevant.

There is no fee to attend the conference. We are working to obtain funds for travel bursaries to assist students and unfunded researchers to attend, but are not able to guarantee any assistance to individuals at this stage.

Conference organisers:
Dr. des. Diljeet Bhachu
Dr M. J. Grant

Full information at https://www.ed.ac.uk/edinburgh-college-art/reid-school-music/decolonising-musical-university

SONG STUDIES 2020 – Exploring Interdisciplinary Approaches to Songs and Practices of Singing (1200-today)

Ghent University, 1-3 July 2020

Deadline call for papers: 20 December 2019

Keynote speaker: Monique Scheer (Tübingen University)

The singing voice is a medium of expression that is found in all times and cultures. People have always been singing, not only to perform entertainingly, but also to express emotions or to embody identities. This has for example made collective singing (and listening) practices a primary way for people to articulate and embody the identities that are fundamental to the existence of social groups. The bodily and sensory experience of moving and sounding together in synchrony, enables individuals to experience feelings of togetherness with others.

Song is the versatile medium facilitating such processes. Songs can evoke and channel emotions, employing them for specific (or less specific) means. As a multimodal genre, song enables not only the articulation and embodiment of ideas; as an inherently oral and intangible medium, songs can move through space and time, transgressing any material form. Therefore, songs have proven an ideal tool for the distribution of news, contentious ideas, or mobilising messages.

This conference aims to bring together researchers from various disciplines investigating song (for example musicology, literary studies, history, sociology, performance studies, cognition studies, anthropology, etc.). The focus will be on the definition of possible approaches to the study of this medium (both in its material and performed existence), its performances (in any form) and reception (in any context). Research examples may cover songs written and sung in any culture and language, and any (historical) period. Common ground will be found through concepts, approaches and methodologies, encouraging an interdisciplinary and transhistorical dialogue, breaking ground for a new research field: song studies.

Possible research areas and questions to be explored are:

  • how to study the multimodality of the genre, acknowledging both textual and musical characteristics, and its performative nature;
  • the sensory/bodily and emotional/affective experience of listening and singing;
  • cognitive and/or affective processes of singing (and collective singing practices);
  • how to study the performative aspects of songs in historical contexts;
  • the ‘power’/agency of song;
  • the role of song and singing in social processes and historical developments; etc. We invite proposals for 20-minute individual papers (max. 300 words) or alternative formats (pre- submission inquiry is encouraged). As the aim of this conference is to facilitate dialogue, there will be ample time for discussion and exchange. Please send your proposal, including your name, academic affiliation and a short biographical note, no later than 20 December 2019 to renee.vulto@ugent.be. For more information and registration, see www.songstudies.ugent.be.

In Search of Perfect Harmony: Giuseppe Tartini’s Music and Music Theory in Local and European Contexts

International Musicological Conference
University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Tartini House, Piran, Slovenia
16 and 17 November 2020

The 250th anniversary of the death of the famous violinist, violin teacher, composer and music theorist Giuseppe Tartini (1692–1770), which we will commemorate in 2020, presents an opportunity to reconsider the research of his life and work already done, as well as to address topics that have so far remained in the background. The international musicological conference, which will be held on 16 and 17 November 2020 in Ljubljana and Piran, Tartini’s birthplace, will focus on Tartini’s musical-theoretical thought and his compositional creativity.
When in 1896 Tartini’s monument was erected in Piran, one of the commemorative records named him as “an artist and scientist of European reputation without an equal” (Amico, 2 August, 1896). Indeed, not many musicians made history both as an outstanding composer (the renowned mathematician, physicist and Tartini’s contemporary Leonhard Euler even called him the greatest composer of the time) and as an exceptional music theorist (beginning from traditional musical-theoretical ideas, Tartini laid the foundation for many later music-acoustical considerations). Especially after he began to devote himself to speculative reflections on music, Tartini seems to have been searching for harmony between music theory (which he studied in depth, even reaching back to ancient concepts of music) and musical practice (his daily routine as composer and violinist at St Anthony’s Basilica in Padua and as violin teacher).
Given that during his lifetime Tartini’s music and musical-theoretical works were known throughout Europe, they should also be considered in a broad European context. Despite his international reputation and his residence in Padua, Tartini remained connected to his native Piran: although he never returned to live there after 1708, when he left for Padua, he stayed in touch with his family through a lively correspondence. The influence of local (Istrian) folk-music traditions is of particular importance for his compositional output as well as for his theoretical reflections on music. This is revealed by the fact that the Piran archives still hold many Tartini documents, including manuscripts containing theoretical essays and fragments.

In this context, the following themes seem to be of special interest:
– Tartini’s music-theoretical thought in Italian and European contexts.
– Tartini as a follower of ancient theoretical tradition.
– Specific musical-theoretical questions in Tartini’s treatises.
– Tartini as a mathematician and a philosopher.
– Previous research on Tartini’s musical-theoretical thought and the publications of his musical-theoretical writings.
– Links between Tartini’s music theory and his compositional work.
– Tartini’s music in the European context.
– Tartini’s perceptions of folk-music tradition.
– Traces of folk music (especially Istrian) in Tartini’s works.
– Musical analysis of Tartini’s works.
– Music-theoretical and compositional influences on Tartini and Tartini’s influence on music theorists and composers of later periods.
– Other themes connected to Tartini’s compositional and musical-theoretical work.

Proposals for papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes discussion), which should include a title and a short summary of the proposed topic (200-400 words), a short biography and contact details of the author, are to be sent by Sunday, 31 May 2020, to nejc.sukljan@ff.uni-lj.si.

Authors will be informed about the selection of papers, which will be reviewed by the international scholarly committee, no later than 30 June 2020. The final programme of the conference will be formed by the middle of October 2020. After the conference, the selected papers will be published either in a monograph or a special number of Musicological Annual.

The official languages of the conference will be Slovenian and English.

The registration fee for active participation at the conference is € 50.00; members of the Slovenian Musicological Society may participate free of charge.

Invited keynote speakers
Prof. Sergio Durante, Ph.D. (University of Padua)
Prof. Pierpaolo Polzonetti, Ph.D. (University of California, Davis)

International scholarly committee
Prof. Patrizio Barbieri (Rome)
Prof. Dr Matjaž Barbo (University of Ljubljana)
Prof. Sergio Durante, Ph.D. (University of Padua)
Sr. Res. Fell. Dr Metoda Kokole (Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts)
Prof. Dr Svanibor Pettan (University of Ljubljana)
Prof. Neal Zaslaw, Ph.D. (Cornell University)

Organizational committee
Assist. Prof. Dr Katarina Bogunović Hočevar (Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana)
Res. Assoc. Dr Klemen Grabnar (Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts)
Assist. Prof. Dr Nejc Sukljan (Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana)

British-Russian Crossroads: Cultural and Historical Exchanges of Words and Music

15 February 2020

Venue: Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Memorial Museum-Apartment (Saint Petersburg State Museum of Theatre and Music), Zagorodniy Prospekt, 28, Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, 191002.

Part of the Russia-UK Year of Music project: 

A Voice between Nations: forming lasting bilateral Russia-UK collaborative partnerships through word and music’ (14 February – 16 February 2020)

Conference languages will be English and Russian with simultaneous translation.

Held within Russia-UK Year of Music, this conference celebrates the longstanding fascination the two countries have for each other’s cultures through word and music by rediscovering the intersection of their cultures and identities.  It takes place as part of a festival of art song that focuses on the distinct nineteenth-century Russian-British synthesis of Saint Petersburg’s cosmopolitanism and London’s liberalism which crystallised in the unique sound world of Rimsky-Korsakov’s and the ‘Mighty Handful’s’ romances, and the legacy that this set for on-going intercultural exchange through words and music.

Bringing together performers, musicologists, composers, and cultural historians – and building a community across national boundaries – the conference seeks to encourage an interdisciplinary dialogue that looks at topics relating to the intersection of Russian and British culture through words and music both specifically through art song, as well as in a wider sense, including:

  • Russian songs, opera and musicals set to British texts, either in the vernacular or in translation
  • British songs, opera and musicals set to Russian texts, either in the vernacular or in translation
  • Formation of performer identities, practices and audience reception in the engagement with Russian and/or British art song internationally
  • Words and music through the artistry of Russian-British performers and Russian-British composers
  • Performance and reception of Russian art song, opera and musicals in Britain
  • Performance and reception of British art song, opera and musicals in Russia
  • Representation of Russian music or music-making in British literature or film
  • Representation of British music or music-making in Russian literature or film
  • Historic and current Russian-British collaborations in performance, and the composition of song, opera and musicals.
  • Intersection of Russian-British artistic synthesis of words and music with other countries, cultures or languages

Keynote speakers and panels:

Professor Philip Ross Bullock, University of Oxford

Olga Manulkina, Saint Petersburg State University

Professor Liudmila Kovnatskaya, Saint Petersburg Conservatory, & Russian Institute of Fine Arts History in St Petersburg


Special sessions will be dedicated to:

  • Performer perspectives session and panel discussion with Professor Iain Burnside (Guildhall School of Music & Drama) and soloists from the Mariinsky Opera
  • Contemporary composition perspective session with Russian composers in conversation with Professor Philip Grange (University of Manchester)


As part of the event participants are cordially invited to:

  • Concert of Russian and British art song and piano music (14th February 2020)
  • Song Masterclasses with singers from the Mariinsky Opera (14th February 2020)
  • Concert of Russian-British art song by advanced students of the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, and the State Saint Petersburg Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory at the Theatre Museum (15th February 2020) 
  • Concert in Sheremetev Palace by singers from the Mariinsky Opera accompanied by Iain Burnside and Maria Razumovskaya (16th February 2020)


Plans are being made to publish selected papers in an edited volume of proceedings.


Please submit abstracts of 250 words for 20 minute papers or 30 minute performance lecture-recitals to maria.razumovskaya@gsmd.ac.uk by 10 November 2019.

Please direct queries regarding logistics and travel to/in Russia to Lidia.Ader@artparking.org

Conference committee:
Dr Lidia Ader, Russian State Rimsky-Korsakov Museum, Saint Petersburg
Dr Paul Archbold, School of Advanced Studies, University of London
Dr Maria Razumovskaya, Guildhall School of Music & Drama, London

Supported by:

British Embassy in Moscow

State Rimsky-Korsakov Museum, Saint Petersburg

Guildhall School of Music & Drama, London

Institute of Modern Languages Research, School of Advanced Studies

Open World Research Initiative, Cross Language Dynamics (AHRC)

International Workshop: “Women as Patrons: Gender, Patronage and Cutural Transfer at the turn of the 20th century”

The workshop ‘Women as Patrons’ aims to foster an interdisciplinary dialogue about the role of women in the patronage system and in the dissemination and management of music and arts at the turn of the 20th century. Taking into account previous patterns of female patronage throughout history, this workshop seeks to explore the emergence of a highly empowered network of women in various aspects of musical and cultural life during a moment of economic change characterised by the expansion of capitalism and the second wave of colonialism. The goal of this workshop is to define gender patterns in the promotion of music and arts at that time, going beyond individual and local experiences to focus on the networks, transnational exchanges, and cultural transfers operating around those cultural processes.

The Workshop will be held in Bern from 15 November to 16 November 2019 at the Institut für Musikwissenschaft, Universität Bern, Mittelstrasse 43, Room 120.

Full workshop details available at: https://www.musik.unibe.ch/research/conferences/workshop_frauen_als_maezeninnen/index_eng.html

Presentations by:

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Albo, Georgia State University, Atlanta

Prof. Dr. Teresa Cascudo, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño
Prof. Dr. Annegret Fauser, North Carolina University at Chapel Hill

Prof. Dr. Anselm Gerhard, Universität Bern
Prof. Dr. Sylvia Kahan, City University of New York
Prof. Dr. Jann Pasler, University of California, San Diego
Prof. Dr. Bullock Philip Ross, University of Oxford
Dr. Ascensión Mazuela-Anguita, Universidad de Granada
Dr. Martin Rempe, Universität Konstanz
Dr. Sabine Hohl, Universität Bern
Dr. Victor Strazzeri, Universität Bern



Workshop Organizers:
Dr. Vincenzina C. Ottomano & María Cáceres-Piñuel


Fail Better: Sharing Challenges and Learning in Classical Music Innovation

Maastricht Centre for the Innovation of Classical Music

Dates: 27–28 March 2020
Main venue: Conservatory Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Call for Projects, Workshops and Papers:

Innovation in classical music is happening everywhere, driven by musicians and orchestras around the globe. Although we tend to share our successes, there are few spaces to reflect on the challenges, obstacles and potential risks that we encounter in innovative practices. Through sharing these we believe that valuable learning opportunities can be created.


Following from the success of the first international symposium of the Maastricht Centre for the Innovation of Classical Music in March 2019, which was attended by 103 delegates, we would again like to invite practitioners; music educators and students; orchestral musicians, directors and administrators; as well as academic and artistic researchers to present innovative projects. Presentation of work in progress, as well as completed projects, is encouraged. In particular we seek to reflect on how obstacles and setbacks can trigger learning processes. The symposium aims to stimulate a supportive and fruitful dialogue in order to better understand what ingredients lead to successful innovation in classical music.

Participants are encouraged to present in a manner that best reflects or expresses their practice, rather than simply describing it. Therefore, nontraditional and interactive learning-appropriate modes of presentation are encouraged, such as lecture-recitals, workshops, performances, project presentations or combinations of these, using, for example, video, audio, posters, or panel discussions.
We invite submissions relating to the following themes, though this is not an exhaustive selection. All presentations should be in English.

  • Learning how to collaborate
  • Engaging audiences, e.g. children, young people, or older people
  • Learning as an institution and institutionalizing innovation
  • Making music matter
  • Exploring new musical contexts and spaces.

These themes can be explored with reference to any aspect of work in classical music, whether it be audience development, participatory projects, outreach and community work, new educational formats, empowerment of musicians, spatial/venue innovation, digital mediations, institutional learning, or cultural policy. Again, this list is not exhaustive.

Abstracts (max. 250 words) should be submitted to mcicm-fasos@maastrichtuniversity.nl by 8 December 2019. Please include the name of presenter(s)/author(s), a short biography and organizational or institutional affiliation. Also add presentation requirements: spatial setup, stage, technical equipment, etc. The committee will review and select projects based on their relevance, clarity of the project’s main learning opportunity, and originality. Moreover, the committee seeks to construct a program bringing together learning opportunities from all levels of experience and expertise. Students thus are particularly encouraged to attend.

For queries, please contact mcicm-fasos@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Committee:
Prof Peter Peters, Director Maastricht Centre for the Innovation of Classical Music, Maastricht University.
Dr Stefan Rosu, Intendant philharmonie zuidnederland.
Dr Ruth Benschop, Professor at Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Research Centre Autonomy of the Arts and the Public Sphere.
Dr Joachim Junghanss, Director Conservatorium Maastricht.
Dr Neil T. Smith, Postdoctoral researcher, Maastricht University. Karoly Galindo Molina, MA, Research assistant, Maastricht University.

The Maastricht Centre for the Innovation of Classical Music (MCICM) aims to study the dynamics of changing classical music practices and their societal contexts, and to actively shape classical music futures. The centre is a collaboration between philharmonie zuidnederland, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, and Maastricht University. We combine academic research on innovation of performance practices with artistic research to renew classical music practices and music education in artistically relevant ways.

‘Early Recordings: the Impacts of a Transformative Technology’

Submission Deadline: 10 January 2020
Conference Location: Royal College of Music, London (UK)
Date: 23 April 2020

Programme Committee:
Barbara Gentili (Newcastle University)
Trevor Herbert (Royal College of Music)
Eva Moreda Rodriguez (University of Glasgow)
Richard Wistreich (Royal College of Music)

The aim of this one-day conference is to focus on the wider cultural and social impact of the technological development and dissemination of early recordings.

The investigation of early recordings has been a booming field in recent decades. Since the groundbreaking study of Robert Philip in 1992, the shift of interest in musicology from products to processes has progressively broadened the subject’s scope. Early recordings have been co-opted as new ‘texts’ for a variety of purposes, including studies in reception, sociology, cultural and media theory, and the history of technology (Cook, Clarke, Leech-Wilkinson and Rink, 2004).

The programme committee welcomes proposals from early-career researchers, postgraduate students and established experts who currently work on early recordings in the widest range of genres and perspectives.

Presentations will be welcome on a range of topics including, but not limited to:

  • The wider cultural significance of early recordings: what clues do they offer about aesthetic tastes of past societies and how do they reflect wider cultural trends (e.g. notions of gender and identity)?
  • Technological processes: recording technologies, mastering and pressing;
  • Early recordings as documents of past performance practices (stylistic gestures; register timbral division; instrumental emulation of vocal expressivity; methods of quantitative analysis; broadening of repertoires; rediscovery of neglected collections);
  • The impact of recordings on performance and concert practice;
  • Transnationalism: recordings as exemplars of national styles and identities; an exploration of the factors that determined which recordings were accepted as stylistic models, and which rejected, as they travelled beyond their countries of origin.

Abstracts for 20-minute papers or 30-minute lecture-recitals (maximum 250 words) and short biographies (120 words) should be sent to barbara.gentili@rcm.ac.uk by Friday 10th January 2020, including the applicant’s institutional affiliation and contact details. The programme committee will communicate its decision by 3 February 2020.

The day, which will include a concert of early recordings performed on an original EMG gramophone, will end with a roundtable session covering the main topics of the event.

There are a small number of travel bursaries which, generously offered by the Institute of Musical Research, will be available to postgraduate students or early career researchers without an academic affiliation. Please contact the conference organiser at barbara.gentili@rcm.ac.uk for information on how to apply.

Symposium: Schumann’s Faust on the Verges of Music Theatre

Proposal deadline: December 20, 2019

Conference dates: June 27-28, 2020

Location: Ghent (BE)

Robert Schumann’s long underestimated Szenen aus Goethes Faust (1844-53) for soloists, choir, and orchestra has increasingly been recognized as one of the composer’s masterpieces. Together with Ghent University, the University of Leuven, and the University of Toronto, Opera Ballet Vlaanderen is organizing a symposium on June 27-28, 2020 to mark its new production of this important work, staged by Julian Rosefeldt and conducted by Philippe Herreweghe. The symposium will take place in the historical building of the Ghent Opera and will feature keynotes by Laura Tunbridge (Oxford University) and Peter Höyng (Emory University).  

We welcome contributions from areas such as musicology, music theory, literary studies, and theatre studies. Topics include but are not limited to:

– questions of performability, musicality and theatricality in Goethe’s Faust and Schumann’s Faust-Szenen 

– close analysis of (aspects of) Schumann’s Faust-Szenen

– the position of the Faust-Szenen in Schumann’s oeuvre

– other medialisations of Goethe’s play and their relationship to Schumann’s Faust-Szenen 

– questions of genre in musico-dramatic Faust settings in the long nineteenth century, from Spohr to Busoni

– issues of selection, adaptation and interpretation in musico-dramatic Faust settings 

We invite proposals for individual papers (30 minutes plus 15 minutes discussion), panels of 2-4 papers, and roundtables. Proposals for individual papers should include an abstract of no more than 300 words, as well as the presenter’s name, affiliation, and a short biography (max. 200 words). Proposals for panel sessions should include the above for each of the papers as well as a short rationale (approx. 200 words) for the panel as a whole. Proposals for roundtables should include an abstract of up to 600 words, outlining the rationale and organization of the roundtable, as well as a short biography (max. 200 words) for each of the participants. 

Please format proposals as pdf files and submit them to Katherina Lindekens (klindekens@operaballet.be) by December 20, 2019. Participants will be notified by late January. Organizers: Katherina Lindekens (Opera Ballet Vlaanderen), Steven Vande Moortele (University of Toronto), Gunther Martens (Ghent University), Tobias Hermans (Ghent University), Camilla Bork (University of Leuven).

International Workshop: ‘Women as Patrons: Gender, Patronage and Cutural Transfer at the turn of the 20th century’

We are pleased to announce the International Workshop: ‘Women as Patrons: Gender, Patronage and Cutural Transfer at the turn of the 20th century’. The Workshop will be held in Bern from 15 November to 16 November 2019 at the Institut für Musikwissenschaft, Universität Bern, Mittelstrasse 43, Room 120.

This event is free to attend.

Full workshop details available at: https://www.musik.unibe.ch/research/conferences/workshop_frauen_als_maezeninnen/index_eng.html

The workshop ‘Women as Patrons’ aims to foster an interdisciplinary dialogue about the role of women in the patronage system and in the dissemination and management of music and arts at the turn of the 20th century. Taking into account previous patterns of female patronage throughout history, this workshop seeks to explore the emergence of a highly empowered network of women in various aspects of musical and cultural life during a moment of economic change characterised by the expansion of capitalism and the second wave of colonialism. The goal of this workshop is to define gender patterns in the promotion of music and arts at that time, going beyond individual and local experiences to focus on the networks, transnational exchanges, and cultural transfers operating around those cultural processes.

Presentations by:

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Albo, Georgia State University, Atlanta

Prof. Dr. Teresa Cascudo, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño

Prof. Dr. Annegret Fauser, North Carolina University at Chapel Hill

Prof. Dr. Anselm Gerhard, Universität Bern

Prof. Dr. Sylvia Kahan, City University of New York

Prof. Dr. Jann Pasler, University of California, San Diego

Prof. Dr. Bullock Philip Ross, University of Oxford

Dr. Ascensión Mazuela-Anguita, Universidad de Granada

Dr. Martin Rempe, Universität Konstanz

Dr. Sabine Hohl, Universität Bern

Dr. Victor Strazzeri, Universität Bern

Workshop Organizers
Dr. Vincenzina C. Ottomano & Dr. María Cáceres-Piñuel


The Annual Postgraduate Conference for The Society for Musicology in Ireland/The Irish National Committee of the International Council for Traditional Music

Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, Ireland

Call for Papers
Deadline:1st November 2019
Email: ictm.smi.pg2020@gmail.com

The Society for Musicology in Ireland and the Irish National Committee of the International Council for Traditional Music are pleased to announce a joint postgraduate conference to take place at the University of Limerick on and Friday 17th and Saturday 18th January 2020.

The conference will feature a keynote address from Professor Philip Bohlman, “Lifted Up from the Earth at the Very Moment of Death”: The Border, the Wall, and the Musical Topography of Migration Crisis.

The conference committee would like to invite postgraduates working in all areas of musical research to submit proposals for conference papers. Speakers will be given 20 minutes for their paper, followed by a 10-minute discussion. Areas of research include, but are not limited to, traditional music, historical musicology, ethnomusicology, music theory and analysis, music technology, music pedagogy, popular music studies, arts practice, psychology of music and music and gender. In addition to the traditional paper sessions, there will also be a Careers Forum on the Saturday as part of the conference. Master’s students are also welcome to share their work in progress in a 10-minute presentation.

To submit a proposal, please send an email attachment (.doc or .docx, not .pdf) on or before 1st November 2019 to the conference committee at ictm.smi.pg2020@gmail.com with the following information:

  • Title of paper
  • Abstract (maximum 250 words)
  • Full name, contact details and institutional affiliation
  • Short biography (maximum 150 words)

Applicants will be notified in mid-November 2019.