Meeting for Sound and Musical Instruments CO2019OC

8th International Scientific Meeting for the Study of Sound and Musical Instruments

CONGRESSO DE ORGANOLOGIA 2019 ORGANOLOGICAL CONGRESS

Belmonte, east-central Portugal

20-22 September 2019

Instruments of culture and peace

Many complain about the backstage, or invasive, pollution of sound in daily lives, and solutions? Social anxiety is mirroring short and long term influences, notably from birth, or even pre-natal effects through a stressed mother (scientific trends differ, precisely for this reason, we give here an opportunity for discussion, acknowledging it as a vast and often neglected issue). Many refer to “how life in Nature” is so beautiful, where we can play music in a perfect ambiance, but can’t or aren’t moving a finger to do something about it. We are doing it. We are developing a project that not only deals with the essential creativity in the human being but also the setting up of biodiversity in a balanced environment, where one can be thyself. All who visit us feel well here – why? This subject matter is far more important than it seems at a first glance. There is too much ‘noise’ in most people’s lives, too many front page headlines, too many characters on stage, too many spotlights, and everybody talks about all at the same time… we can’t listen to each, we can’t think about each… we need ‘silence’, reflection, to listen to life and art. Why are so many people frustrated and often depressed? Why so much illness with such highly developed medical support? Among many factors, the “sound quantity and quality” in our lives is fundamental. And that of music in our psychological and social balance too.

And – how music and creativity in sound can help a society in crisis? Fight fights, promote peace? How to help a society to be more united and less fragile? Can we, with our work, do better – and be part of the “positive productive” and not, as many do say, be the “useless” for the society? We are inviting you to discuss these and other prominent topics, which are intrinsically related to sound and musical instruments. Please come forward. In a society which is getting used to lightly give an opinion for anything and nothing in the social media, we invite those who “think” and – concretely “do something” – to visit, show, and think and do further.

From the morning of a bright Friday to an exquisite lunch on Sunday at the fabulous old Monastery, now a luxury hotel called Pousada de Belmonte, with concerts, recitals, activities, and full immersion Sessions, our program is quite promising. However, our special invitation to sociologists and musicologists had a good response in quality but not as wide, thematically, as we wanted it to be. There is still time, to make proposals and be part of this interesting gathering of people, who positively and openly discuss about the various issues that concern us all. We look forward to have more work presented that deals with the social impact of music and their musical tools, and studies about sound – for instance, how sound (acoustic and electronic) is affecting daily lives, our world.

You can have more information at the congress website, which is periodically updated: link [https://congressorganimusic.wixsite.com/co2019oc]

Or you can contact us directly: congressorg2019.animusic@gmail.com

Registration: besides the program (as listed above), it includes an active visit to an Exhibition of Musical Instruments (historical, traditional and technological), an unique bag with the program and materials, equipment and technical support, Wireless internet, coffee-breaks (nice and diversified), lunches (2), a banquet-lunch (gourmet), selected visits, reviewed publication (in the book series ‘Liranimus’, which contains essays on Organology, or online), certificate of participation, perhaps a memoir-gift, publishers, makers, restorers, and participants stalls, networking opportunities and, essentially, time reserved “on purpose” for constructive discussions and exchange of ideas. Note: group meals are optional.

All activities are open, namely recitals, concerts, demonstrations, workshops (within a registration limit), and visits. 

Registration fee

Early bird registration » 80€ for ANIMUSIC members (which has a symbolic registration fee of 20€, and no annual fees, no profit) / 110€ others (early bird registration until the 31st of August)

Regular » 120€ (ANIMUSIC) / 150€ (from 1st September)

Dayly fee » 40€ (does not include the banquet-lunch)

Banquet-lunch gourmet (for those friends accompanying, still a special price: 35€)

Other costs: Portugal is one of the less expensive countries in Europe. To give an idea, an expresso coffee costs about 0,70€ in a normal coffee-shop (it’s everywhere, this is the normal coffee, similar to Italia), or even less in automatic machines. Meals may be around 10€ (complete with wine, etc), including nice fresh grilled fish or vegetarian food. There are various options for lodging in Belmonte, you can check with the different available search engines or at Airbnb, averaging 70€ per night in a good hotel.

Transportation: You may use Porto’s or Lisboa’s international airports. From Porto, it is probably easier to rent a car, the rates, when booking from abroad, are quite low (you can have a car for 10€ a day or similar) and it’s basically all highway till Belmonte (if avoiding crossing Porto, you have: A4-A24-A25-A23; or crossing Porto: A29 or A1-A25-A23) which is very comfortable. The transportation from Lisboa is quite easy, also renting a car, or by public transportation: From the airport you take a taxi (5 to 8€)  or the metropolitan, to the Oriente station, which is near the River Tejo (beautiful place to visit if you have time, where the Oceanario is, plus other interesting sites). There, going up the stairs or lift, you check the line for Covilhã, usually trains are in time. If you pay online with anticipation (5, 8 or more days), you can even have a discount of up to 65%, if you are senior, it’s always 50%. The ticket to Covilhã, in the speed direct train, costs (as per today): 17,70€. Arriving in Covilhã, you can take a taxi (not expensive), a bus or meet with a group organised by us and the Municipality, on the 19th of September. If you have special needs, please contact us so that we arrange a special way for transportation. We work the best we can to help your experience be perfect and unique.

Portugal has been rated as the third safest country in the world, after Iceland and New Zealand. So, by visiting us, you shall discover more of this amazing country and meet fellows who are interested in your work, in discussing ideas and in moving forward. This is project Erdissol-ANIMUSIC.

For more information, visit us at this link. You are most welcome to contact us directly if you have questions (email).

Working in Music

Call for Papers: Third Working in Music Conference:
Working in Music – Now and Then
University of Turku, Finland, 15-17 April 2020


The Working in Music Network (WIM) is pleased to announce its third Working in Music Conference, to be hosted by the University of Turku, Finland, in April 2020. The Conference follows the staging of previous WIM conferences in Glasgow (2016) and Lausanne (2018) and the establishment of the Network (https://wim.hypotheses.org/). WIM was launched in Lausanne in 2018 and has been established by scholars interested in the historical and contemporary nature of working in music. It has adopted the following Statement of Purpose: ‘Working in Music is an international research network. Our purpose is to conduct and disseminate innovative research about all aspects of what it means to work in music. We aim to understand music as work through economic, sociocultural, political, legal and historical lenses, and to explore working conditions and experiences across genres and divisions of labour. Our approach is multidisciplinary and endeavours to forge connections between academic disciplines through shared interests in music and work. Our network developed from and is centred on a biennial conference in which scholars meet to exchange and debate issues and ideas. We are also committed to working with musicians, practitioners and music industries personnel’.

Following Ruth Finnegan, it is possible to say that one of the noticeable aspects of musical work, is that the work is often hidden. The hours that are taken to master an instrument are hidden from the public, the musicians who make recordings and perform live are often hidden behind the “stars”, the ways musicians find work and work with other musicians and music intermediaries are often hidden, and the vast majority of working musicians remain anonymous. Meanwhile those working behind the scenes in areas such as publishing, live music, artists’ management and recording largely remain similarly unknown as well as the ways they make music and musical careers happen. But music only happens because work is put in and it is this context that we issue this Call for Papers. We invite proposals for papers which address – either historically or in the contemporary context – one or more of the following themes:
Musicians’ working lives and practices
Employment practices and working conditions within the music industries
Musicians and other musical workers’ representative organisations
The effect of intermediaries – such as agents, managers, promoters, journalists etc – on musicians’ working conditions and careers
Collaborations between musicians and non-musicians in getting music made, played or publicised
Intellectual property, labour law and other axes of musical labour
Discrimination and inequality in musical labour and employment
Musical labour and employment in specific genres of music
Musical labour and changing technology (including musical labour in the digital age)
Online “platforms” as new intermediaries or systems of surveillance
Musicians’ working lives in orchestras, bands and other ensembles
Musicians’ collaborative networking practices which allow work it be done and increase its visibility
Musical labour and creativity
Music and the labour movement
Touring and working in music
Non-musicians working in music
Musicians as employers


Proposals
Paper proposals are invited on these topics – and on any other issue relevant to Working in Music. WIM is a deliberately broad-based network and so proposals will be welcomed from any perspective, using any methodology and addressing any kind of music at any historical juncture. Please note that papers should last for 20 minutes and the conference organisers will require chairs to ensure that presenters keep to this limit. Proposals should be in English, which will be the working language for the conference. Please note that non-native English speakers whose proposals are accepted will be invited to post full versions of their papers on the conference website.

Submitting Proposals
Proposals should include the name and contact details (email) of the proposer, the title of the proposal and an abstract of no more than 150 words. We also invite proposals for panels. Please send proposals to wim2020@lists.utu.fi. The deadline for proposals is 30 September 2019. We hope to inform applicants of decisions by 1 November 2019.

Keynote Speakers
We are delighted to announce the following keynote speakers:
Pete Jenner, Sincere Management.
Pete has managed a number of major artists including: Pink Floyd, The Clash, The Pretenders and Ian Dury. He was also one of the organisers of the Stones in the Park free concert in London’s Hyde Park in 1969.
Izabela Wagner, University of Warsaw and Institute Convergence Migration (Paris).
Izabela is author of Producing Excellence: The Making of Virtuosos (Rutgers University Press, 2015). She is also the author of several articles on the working conditions and careers of creative professionals.

Venue
The conference will be held on the main campus of the University of Turku. This location is within walking distance of a range of restaurants, bars, coffee shops and supermarkets. It is a 10 minute walk to the city centre and a 5 minute walk from Kupittaa railway station for connections to Helsinki and elsewhere.

Other Information
Turku is the oldest town in Finland and is located on the Aurajoki river. It has its own airport and is approximately 2 hours from Helsinki by train or bus. It is 11 hours by boat from Stockholm, a journey which takes you through the splendours of the Stockholm and Turku archipelagos.

Amongst other attractions, Turku boosts one of the most distinctive cathedrals in Europe and an impressive medieval castle. It also hosts a range of award winning restaurants and has a vibrant bar culture. Live music takes place in a range of venues and nightclubs, including on the river.

For more see: https://www.visitturku.fi/ and https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2019/jun/01/turku-finland-city-break-restaurants-bars

Website
The conference website will be updated regularly. It can be found at: www.utu.fi/WIM2020.

Conference Fee
The conference fee has yet to be set but is expected to be in the region of €150 for waged delegates and €80 for unwaged, inclusive of registration, tea and coffee, and a reception on the first night of the conference.

Welcome
We look forward to welcoming you to Turku.
Martin Cloonan and Marc Perrenoud, chairs, Working in Music Network.

Special Event: Sample Finnish sauna
On Saturday 18 April conference organiser Martin Cloonan invites you to join at his local sauna on the nearby island of Ruissalo (15 minutes from the main railway station by bus). For a nominal fee (circa 5 €) you can sample a traditional Finnish sauna and get the opportunity to bathe in the Baltic. All you need is a swimming costume, a towel and an adventurous mind. Further details will be provided at the conference.

Scientific Committee: Funmi Arewa, Pierre Bataille, Marie Buscatto, Martin Cloonan, Simon Frith, Nuné Nikogosyan, Marc Perrenoud, Hyacinthe Ravet, Jérémy Sinigaglia, Matt Stahl, Charles Umney, John Williamson.
Local Organising Committee: Marika Ahonen, Johannes Brusila, Martin Cloonan, Kari Kallioniei, Eileen Karmy-Bolton, Gabrielle Kielich, Sanna Qvick, Kim Ramstedt, John Richardson.

IMS2022: 21st Quinquennial IMS Congress

Location: Athens, Greece
Dates: August 22–26, 2022

The 21st Quinquennial IMS Congress (IMS2022) will be held in Athens, Greece, from August 22 to 26, 2022. It is sponsored by the Hellenic Musicological Society under the aegis of the Department of Music Studies of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the Department of Music Studies of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Conference website: https://www.musicology.org/ims2022

The Mediterranean: Migrant Sounds

Location: Valencia, Spain
Dates: July 23–26, 2019

3rd Meeting of the IMS Study Group “Mediterranean Music Studies”
The 3rd meeting of the IMS Study Group “Mediterranean Music Studies” will be held in Valencia, Spain, during the 2nd International Conference of the Associació Valenciana de Musicologia, entitled The Mediterranean: Migrant Sounds, which is taking place from July 23 to 26, 2019.

Conference website: http://avamus.org/en/2019-conference

Atlantic Crossings: Music from 1492 through the Long 18th Century

Location: Boston, USA
Dates: June 7–8, 2019

The IMS Study Group “Early Music and the New World” will hold an open meeting during the session “From Colonies to Republics: Latin American Music in Transition, 1770–1825,” at the international conference Atlantic Crossings: Music from 1492 through the Long 18th Century at Boston University, USA, June 7 to 8, 2019.

Conference website: http://www.bu.edu/earlymusic/2018/09/26/program

“Conflict-/-Collaboration” 42nd Musicological Society of Australia Conference

7-9 December 2019

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music, Monash Univeristy, Clayton, Melbourne, Australia

Call for Papers – Submission Deadline 12 May 2019

Conference Webpage

Conflict-/-Collaboration

In recognising the challenges of a contemporary world where traditional cultural, social and geographical boundaries are regularly broken down and new ones set up, we have created a conference theme that juxtaposes two apparently opposing ideas – conflict and collaboration – to contemplate the consequences for art and everyday life. In music-related contexts we seek answers to the questions: what is the nature of conflict and its consequences; what is the nature of collaboration and its consequences; what happens when conflict and collaboration intersect?

Emphasising the MSA’s remit to encourage and support all disciplinary approaches to music research, we invite papers on any music-related research topic that considers conflict and/or collaboration.

An indication of the approaches and topics we hope to inspire include (but are not limited to):

  • Analytical studies of musical works that deal with conflict
  • Results of collaborative research projects
  • Internal conflicts experienced by practice-led music researchers
  • The gender gap in collaborative contemporary popular music
  • Conflicting views on music for worship
  • A philosophical argument for dispelling Lone Ranger myths and endorsing collective creativity
  • Music as distraction from unresolvable conflict situations
  • Assessing collaborative music-making apps
  • The conflict of the commission: client-composer negotiations
  • Illicit Associations: music critics and music producers
  • Conflicts encountered in preserving indigenous music
  • Is functional harmony a metaphor for collaboration?
  • Balancing the conflicting needs of stakeholders in community music-making
  • Ludomusicology in an era of media-supported extremism
  • Ethnological accounts of collaborations or conflicts between e.g. co-creators of musical works, performers and producers, teachers preparing musicians for competitions and so forth.

In addition to presentations that address the conference theme, and in keeping with the MSA’s objective of supporting all Australian music researchers and their current projects, abstracts on any aspect of music-related research are also welcomed

Proposal Submission Guidelines are available here:
http://msa.org.au/Main.asp?_=Melb2019&FormID=474

Deadline for Submissions is Midnight 12 May 2019 AEST

IV ARLAC Conference

Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Dates: November 5–9, 2019

The IMS Regional Association for Latin America and the Caribbean (ARLAC) will hold its fourth conference at the Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina “Santa María de Buenos Aires” from November 5 to 9, 2019. Members of the IMS are eligible for a reduced conference fee. The link to the call for papers can be found below.

Official website (including CFP): http://www.arlac-ims.com

IMSEA Conference 2019

Location: Suzhou, China
Dates: October 18–20, 2019

The IMS Regional Association for East Asia (IMSEA) warmly invites all music researchers to submit proposals for their fifth biennial conference, to be hosted by the School of Music at Soochow University, China, from October 18 to 20, 2019. All topics of musical scholarship are welcome, including those reflecting historical, ethnographic, analytical, sociological, and cognitive methods, especially presentations of an inter-disciplinary and/or inter-regional character. Participants need not currently reside or work in East Asia.

Official website (including CFP): http://imsea2019.music.suda.edu.cn

Sensing Colonial Ports and Global History: Agency, Affect, Temporality

cpagh-logo

Sensing Colonial Ports and Global History: Agency, Affect, Temporality

An Interdisciplinary Conference at TORCH, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities

2–3 May 2019 (Thursday full day & Friday half day)

St Luke’s Chapel, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter

University of Oxford

https://torch.ox.ac.uk/event/sensing-colonial-ports-and-global-history-agency-affect-temporality-an-interdisciplinary-confe

 

Keynote Speakers:

Leila Fawaz (History, Tufts University)

Benjamin Walton (Music, University of Cambridge)

 

Registration closed 

Enquiries: cpagh@torch.ox.ac.uk

 

Organised by the Colonial Ports and Global History Network at the University of Oxford, this exciting interdisciplinary conference brings together scholars from such disciplines and fields as Archaeology, Area Studies, English, History, Italian and Comparative Literature, Music, Sociology and Visual Anthropology.

The aim of the conference is to cross-examine three key concepts – agency, affect and temporality – that are increasingly central to scholarly thought about colonial port cities. In doing so, it also explores anew the implications of the ‘colonial port city’ for global history, both in and beyond the academy.

In addition to the four panels of individual papers, there will also be a World Café workshop for all of the attendees, with featured presenters and topics.   

We are delighted to have two distinguished keynote speakers: Leila Fawaz, Issam M. Fares Chair of Lebanese & Eastern Mediterranean Studies at Tufts University, whose broad expertise encompasses migration, trade and war in the modern Middle East;and Benjamin Walton, Senior Lecturer in Music at the University of Cambridge, whose rich expertise extends from touring opera troupes beyond Europe to the globalisation of opera in and beyond the nineteenth century. 

On 2 May, lunch and tea/coffee will be provided. On 3 May, tea/coffee will be provided.

Programme

2 MAY (THURSDAY)

8:45–9:00 Registration and Arrival

9:00–9:20 Welcome Remarks

Julia Binter and Yvonne Liao (University of Oxford)

9:20–11:20 World Café Workshop 

Chair: Julia Binter (University of Oxford)

Featured presenters and topics:

 

Michael Leadbetter, Phacharaphorn Phanomvan, and Michael Yeo (University of Oxford)

What are port cities, and how should they be studied?

Moderator: Hatice Yıldız

 

David Martínez-Robles (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

Rethinking colonial agency: The case of treaty ports

Moderators: Yvonne Liao and Min-Erh Wang

 

Ana Cristina Mendes (University of Lisbon)

Touring Mare Nostrum: The ethics of researching colonial port cities and sea travels in the Mediterranean  

Moderator: Olivia Durand

 

Aaron Jaffer (National Maritime Museum)

Redressing silences in the archive 

Moderator: Katharina Oke

 

11:20–11:50 Coffee Break

 

11:50–13:20 Panel 1

Consuming Colonial Ports: Consumption of Goods and Questions of Agency

Chair: Olivia Durand (University of Oxford)

 

Elizabeth Schmidt (University of California, Santa Barbara)

‘Sundry Sorts of Merchants Goods’: Consuming the Empire in Eighteenth-Century Philadelphia

Mikko Toivanen (European University Institute)

Babel in the streets, Berlioz at the club: Mapping Class and Culture in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Singapore and Batavia through Soundscapes

Emma Bond (University of St Andrews)

Playing with the Sugar Histories of Greenock

 

13:20–14:00 Lunch

 

14:05–15:35 Panel 2

Timing Colonial Ports: Global Time and Local Temporalities

Chair: Hatice Yıldız(University of Oxford)

 

David Irving (ICREA & Institució Milà i Fontanals–CSIC, Barcelona)

Temporality, Aesthetics, and Musical Novelty in Early Modern Colonial Port Cities

Nancy Cushing (University of Newcastle, Australia)

The Time Ball and the Time Gun: Marking Time in a Colonial Port City

 Jessica Fernández de Lara Harada (University of Cambridge)

Summer Grass, Traces of the Brave Ones’ Dream: Harada Hatsu on the recollection of a sense of a timeless Japan in Chiapas, Mexico

 

15:35–15:50 Coffee Break

 

15:50–16:50 Keynote: Leila Fawaz (Tufts University)

Chair: Hatice Yıldız

Reflecting on the port cities of the Levant during the Late Ottoman Period

 

18:00– Conference Dinner at Pierre Victoire for presenters and keynote speakers

 

3 MAY (FRIDAY)

8:15–8:30 Arrival

8:30–10:00 Panel 3

Experiencing Colonial Ports: Forming Global Bodies

Chair: Katharina Oke (King’s College London)

 

Debbie Onuoha (Humboldt University of Berlin)

Lagos, Lagos: Navigating Personal Histories between Two Port Cities on Film

Manikarnika Dutta (Wellcome Unit, University of Oxford)

‘Portals of Death’: European Seamen in the Colonial Port Cities of Calcutta and Bombay

Katherine Roscoe (University of Liverpool)

Embodied Experience and Unfree Labour in Port Cities: Convict Workers in Sydney and Gibraltar

 

10:00–10:20 Coffee Break

 

10:20–11:50 Panel 4

Sensing Colonial Ports: Affective Registers

Chair: Min-Erh Wang (University of Oxford)

 

Aatreyee Ghosh (Leiden University)

Looking from the Verandah: Interrogating the Border-Spaces of Port Towns Canton and Batavia through the Historical Fiction of Amitav Ghosh and David Mitchell

Alexander Petrov (Institute of World History, Russian Academy of Sciences)

The Development of Colonial Ports in Russian America

Nagihan Haliloğlu (Ibn Haldun University, Istanbul)

Sensing and Resisting the Colonial Port in Istanbul in Leonard Woolf and Halide Edib’s Writing

 

12:00–13:00 Keynote: Benjamin Walton (University of Cambridge)

Chair: Yvonne Liao

Port Opera

 

13:00–13:10 Closing Remarks

Facilitator: Olivia Durand

 

 

Sonic Circulations 1900-1950, King’s College London, June 2019


Sonic Circulations 1900-1950: Musical Thought, Scientific Fantasies, Global Contexts

King’s College London, Strand Campus, 24-25 June 2019, in association with the Institute of Musical Research, and the Music and Letters Trust.

Confirmed keynote speakers: James Q. Davies (University of California, Berkeley), Gascia Ouzounian (University of Oxford)

Conference respondents: Gundula Kreuzer (Yale University), John Tresch (The Warburg Institute, London)

From the first human flight in 1903, to the aftermath of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, science and technology in the first half of the twentieth century veered between the utopian and the malevolent. Conceived as idea, as material, and as praxis, science and technology prompt questions about mediation, ethics, marginalisation, space, and power. The time is ripe to interrogate the place of sound and music within the social worlds, political structures, and discourses of the early twentieth century, a period shaped by global uncertainty, military conflict, human displacement, and the legacies of scientised colonialism.

This conference, the second meeting of the ‘Sonic Circulations’ research network, will explore the intersections of scientific, technological, and musical discourses in the global contexts of the first half of the twentieth century. We invite a wide range of papers positioned at the nexus of (ethno)musicology, cultural studies, STS, history of science, and sound studies. Responding to intensifying scholarly preoccupation with science, technology, and music in the Enlightenment and nineteenth century, this conference seeks to cast our attentions forward in time, bringing together scholars from diverse fields and academic contexts. In particular, submissions are encouraged to foreground social dynamics, to bring questions of power or historical erasure to bear where science, technology, and music meet, to interrogate hegemonies, or to expand the range of critical/theoretical perspectives and voices that might be mobilised in this field, particularly beyond those from overrepresented geographical centres.

The provisional programme is now available.

See also the full CfP.

The registration fee for the two days is £100 (reduced rate of £50 for students/unwaged), covering refreshments and lunches. Register here (or here for reduced rate).

Programme Committee: Emily I. Dolan (Harvard University), Arman Schwartz (King’s College, London), Emily MacGregor (Royal Holloway, University of London).

For further queries please contact Dr Emily MacGregor: Emily.MacGregor@rhul.ac.uk

http://www.soniccirculations.com/londonconference

@SonCircNetwork