Iberian musical crossroads through the ages: Images of music-making in their transcultural exchanges

Fifteenth symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Iconography of the Performing Arts
organized by the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Institut d’Estudis Catalans

Barcelona, 17–19 October 2018

Iberian peninsula—the home of Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Basque, and Galician peoples—has been a significant economic and political region through the history, which had been both conquered by the powers coming from elsewhere and generating its own forces exploring and conquering other regions and cultures in the world. From the Bronze Age onwards, explorers and traders used the peninsula as the crossroad between the Mediterranean and much of the rest of the world. The Phoenicians came to Iberia in the ninth century BC, and the Greeks followed two centuries later. The Romans conquest of Hispania started during the second Punic War in 206 BC and by the time of Augustus near the entire peninsula was under the control of Rome. During the Middle Ages, Al-Andalus with its Islamic administration was open to an import of Arab knowledge, philosophy, culture, arts and music. Later on, Spain and Portugal were the strongest naval powers in the world and their overseas explorations have radically altered both the old and new worlds: Spain influenced South American and Caribbean cultures, and even the Philippines; the Portuguese travellers, traders and conquerors reached Brazil, sailed along the African coast, and arrived all the way to India, Malacca, and Macao. Through the crown of Aragon, Catalonia experienced cultural exchanges within the western Mediterranean Sea and southern Italy. In addition to the overseas networks, cultural and artistic exchanges were also occurring in Europe through commercial and political ties, and also through marriages between the royal houses. Throughout the history pilgrims walking the Camino de Santiago, or visiting the shrines of Montserrat or Fatima were bringing with them songs, dances and instruments from all over Europe.

All these and many other explorations and migrations created a fertile framework for a rich exchange of musical ideas, sounds, forms, rhythms, dances, and instruments. The Barcelona conference of the ICTM Study Group on the Iconography of Performing Arts will examine visual sources documenting transborder and transcultural transmission of musical ideas between the peoples of the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world. Papers are invited concerning the following topics:

  • Sounds of the ancient world: The Iberian cultures in an exchange with other Mediterranean traditions
  • Islamic sounds in Al-Andalus
  • Music and dances of Spanish Sephardim
  • Music along the road: Travelers and pilgrimages in Spain and Portugal
  • The Borgia family as a mediator of musical life between Iberia, Rome and the Vatican
  • Music and explorers (Columbus, Vasco da Gama, trade routes to Latin America, Asia, Africa)
  • Portuguese ethnohistoric accounts about music of Brazil, Macao, and Estado da Índia
  • Spanish encounters with music cultures of pre-Colombian America
  • Music in Catholic missions of New Spain and in the Christianization of Goa
  • Exchanges between Catalonia and kingdoms of Naples and Sicily
  • Reception of the Italian opera in Spain and Portugal
  • Zarzuela and other music theater in Latin America
  • Spain as a topos in music exoticism (opera, operetta, ballet, dance); Orientalism in Spanish art
  • Exchanges of musical instruments between Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world
  • Internal musical exchanges between the peoples of the Iberian peninsula
  • Spanish/Portuguese iconographic models used in Latin American decorative programs
  • Transcultural musical topics in the 20th- and 21st-century art
  • Proposals related to other transcultural music exchanges in the world may be also considered

English is preferred language for the conference presentations.
Abstracts of 250–300 words may be submitted before 2 April 2018 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309


Jordi Ballester
Societat Catalana de Musicologia
Institut d’Estudis Catalans
Carrer del Carme 47
08001 Barcelona


CityMAC 2018

CityMAC 2018

5-7 July 2018, City, University of London

The City Music Analysis Conference (CityMAC 2018), sponsored by the Society for Music Analysis (SMA), will take place on Thursday 5th to Saturday 7th July 2018 at City, University of London. This international conference will feature analysis of world music, but welcomes paper proposals on any aspect of theory or analysis relating to music of any genre and historical period.

Keynote speakers

Professor Janet Schmalfeldt (Tufts University) and Professor Richard Widdess (SOAS).
Submission deadline: 5th February, 2018. Applicants will be notified by 16th March, 2018.

Proposal categories

  • Papers (20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion)
  • Paper sessions (three or four papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes per paper for discussion)
  • Roundtable discussions (up to 6 participants, each giving a short position paper, followed by a general discussion, total running time of 90 or 120 minutes)
  • Recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings (maximum duration 90 minutes)

Proposal guidelines

  • For individual papers: up to 250 words
  • For paper sessions: 250-word (maximum) summary and up to 200 words for each session participant
  • For roundtable discussions: 250-word (maximum) and up to 150 words for each panel participant
  • For recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings: 250 word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings / scores / other details of works to be included in the event (contact the organiser to discuss)

Further information for applicants

  • Only one proposal of each type is permitted per applicant
  • Proposals must be sent by email as a MS Word or pdf attachment to CityMAC2018@sma.ac.uk
  • Proposals need not be anonymised.
  • Student members and individuals without access to institutional funds are eligible to apply for an SMA Travel Bursary to help cover the costs of travel and accommodation. Further details can be found here: http://www.sma.ac.uk/grants/travel/. Please note that the deadline for application for bursaries is 7 June 2018.
  • Delegates are also welcome to apply to our Development Fund scheme to cover the cost of attending. For further details, see: http://www.sma.ac.uk/grants/development/. There is no deadline for this fund, but retrospective applications will not be considered.
  • All enquiries should be sent to Dr Shay Loya via CityMAC2018@sma.ac.uk.

Programme committee

Dr Chloë Alaghband-Zadeh (Loughborough), Professor L. Poundie Burstein (Hunter College, CUNY), Dr Esther Cavett (King’s College London), Professor Julian Horton (Durham), Dr Shay Loya (City, Organiser), Professor Danuta Mirka (Southampton), Dr Laudan Nooshin (City), Ian Pace (City), Dr Kenneth Smith (Liverpool).

Rethinking Sound 2018

CFP deadline: 31 December 2017
Notification of results: 15 January 2018
Conference dates: 30–31 March 2018
Conference website: http://mrc.hanyang.ac.kr/rethinking-sound
Venue: Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea

Keynote Speakers:

Music Research Center at Hanyang University is pleased to announce an international conference “Rethinking Sound 2018,” to be held on 30–31 March 2018 in Seoul, Korea.

Sound has long been the subject of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, but it has gained more popularity in recent decades; the sheer number of scholarly publications in what one may call “sound studies” testifies to this statement. As the ways in which sound is produced and consumed are continuing to change, we suspect that sound will be of central concern to many of us. What soundscapes are around us, and how do we react to soundscape? Is there any evidence suggesting that the way of thinking about the world is shifting away from “ocularcentric” to “aural-centric”? What are the implications of such a shift? How does (re)thinking about sound help us (re)define human subjectivity?

In attempting to answer these questions, we invite proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) on any topics related to the conference theme “Rethinking Sound,” broadly defined. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Historical/cultural/geographical soundscapes
  • History of listening
  • Human-computer interaction (HCI) with sound
  • Mediated sound/listening
  • Sound and disability studies
  • Sound and ethics
  • Sound and film
  • Sound and gender
  • Sound and noise within/outside musical works
  • Sound and subjectivity/identity
  • Sound and the body
  • Sound in video games
  • Sound, space, and mobility

We welcome proposals from scholars and practitioners as well as early-career researchers and graduate students working in all musicological disciplines.

Submissions, in English, should comprise a paper title, an abstract of up to 250 words, and a short biography of about 150 words. Please email submissions in PDF or Word format to rethinking.sound@gmail.com by 31 December 2017.

Rethinking Sound 2018 is supported by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea.

Pop – Power – Positions

Global Relations and Popular Music
3rd IASPM D-A-CH Symposium

Bern (Switzerland), 18–20 October 2018

In Nigeria, the high pressure to follow the copyright rules of the globalized pop music market restrains the use of samples in hip hop culture. In Egypt, young musicians have no credit cards, leaving them without access to the online music market. In Europe, second and third generation migrants discuss their non-European backgrounds and European identities in songs and tracks. And U.S.-produced Korean pop music (K-Pop) increasingly rivals Korean-produced K-Pop in its concern for authentic presentation.
Issues of power, position, access, and representation have shaped the production, distribution, and reception of popular music and continue to do so today. The three-day interdisciplinary conference Pop – Power – Positions highlights popular music’s embeddedness in a global world. It seeks to uncover and scrutinize the risks, challenges, and potentials of power structures, positioning, and (re)presentations in popular music. The analysis of global, postcolonial structures plays a central role in this endeavour. To date, however, music– and popular music in particular – has only rarely been studied using postcolonial perspectives.
Postcolonialism refers not only to the historical fact of colonialism and its political, geographical, cultural, and economic impact on the countries and regions involved. Rather, postcolonial studies deal with all aspects of cultural diversity, ethnic and cultural difference, and their related power structures. Colonialism as well as postcolonialism refer to hierarchies that are enacted and produced through the construction of the Other and bring about and enforce debateable concepts of representation such as gender, race, ethnic group, nation, class, and culture. In this regard, the effects of (post)colonialism can be detected not only in former colonialized and colonising countries and regions, but also in those which at first sight do not have a colonial heritage, for example Switzerland.
From its beginnings, popular music has been produced and performed in and within (post)colonial (power) structures. Postcolonial traces are, according to Johannes Ismaiel-Wendt, inherent in any popular music (2011). Current productions of popular music in different countries show that (post)colonial conditions live on in popular music, especially in a globalised world, and that musicians as well as recipients react in various ways to this situation.
The conference focuses on (global) power relations and representations of race, cultural difference, ethnicity, gender, class, and nation, including the changes and subversive strategies these may involve. Ethnographic and analytical studies of popular music in and from (former) colonised countries and regions are also welcome.

We invite papers that address the following range of topics and questions:
– Who speaks in popular music? What kinds of power structures shape the production, distribution, and reception of popular music? What is the impact of the Anglophone music business on other music markets? Who speaks about popular music in the areas of marketing, advertising, journalism, fan cultures, (global) politics, and educational institutions – and what vocabulary do they use?
– Have digitalisation and digital networks led to a democratisation of musical processes, or the contrary?
– What sounds and music(s) are processed in what contexts by whom and how, and to what aim? How does the use of certain sounds/music(s) point to existing power relations, dependencies, and availability?
– What role do geographies and geopolitics play in popular music-making? How do geography, world order, and power structures relate?
– In what ways can popular music exist beyond cultural, ethnic, and national geographies? What role does the relation between the Global North and Global South have in popular music?
– How do structures of power and distribution limit the access to the production and reception of popular music?
– What relevance, usability, and impact do technologies (like Digital Audio Workstations) or legal regulations (like the copyright laws) that have been developed in Western contexts have for popular music? In what ways are (post)colonial structures and power relations (re)produced therein?
– What kinds of representations do musicians use for their marketing? What traits are ascribed to music?
– What potential does popular music hold for detecting and changing (or enforcing) colonial and postcolonial power structures?
– How can postcolonial theories be made fruitful for an up-to-date understanding of popular music?
– How do musicians of different forms of popular music process a „(post)colonial experience of the world” („(post)koloniales Welterleben“, Ismaiel-Wendt) in their music?
Popular Music Studies
– How marginalised are specific popular musics within the history of popular music?
– Should or can we write a Global History of Popular Music?
– In what way is the concept of popular music in itself (post)colonial?
– What hierarchies, asymmetries or restraints can be found in inter-/transdisciplinary Popular Music Studies?

Keynote: Dr Jenny Fatou Mbaye (City University London)

Contributions on popular music that lie outside the scope of these topic areas are
welcome and will be considered if possible.

Call in GermanCall in English

Please email your abstract to daniel.allenbach@hkb.bfh.ch by 28 February 2018

More information: http://www.hkb-interpretation.ch/veranstaltungen/pop-power-positions

Centennial Reflections on Women’s Suffrage and the Arts


Local : National : Transnational

An international, multi-disciplinary public conference

University of Surrey, UK, 29–30 June 2018

Keynote Speakers:

  • Irene Cockroft, author of Women in the Arts & Crafts and Suffrage Movements at the Dawn of the 20th Century
  • Elizabeth Crawford, author of The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain and Ireland

CFP: deadline for submissions 26 January 2018

Conference website: www.suffragecentennial.wordpress.com

The 2018 centenary of the Representation of the People Act (6 February 1918), which granted the vote to many women in the UK, yields an ideal opportunity for sustained critical reflection on women’s suffrage. This conference seeks to explore the artistic activities nurtured within the movement, their range and legacy, as well as the relationships between politics and art. In striving for an inclusive, transnational reach, it will at the same time seek to move beyond traditional emphases on white middle-class feminism and explore the intersections between the regional, national, and global contexts for women’s suffrage with specific respect to the arts.

While proposals addressing any aspects of women’s suffrage will be welcomed, this conference will focus upon three strands:

  1. Women’s suffrage in/and the arts
  2. Women’s suffrage in Surrey and the surrounds
  3. Transnational networks and flows of texts in relation to women’s suffrage

20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of these strands, including but not limited to:

  • Late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century women’s writing on suffrage;
  • Political reflections on the arts and the cultural sphere, e.g. in music;
  • Transnational networks and mobilities of political texts and ideas, incorporating suffrage movements in other countries;
  • Politically active individuals with strong links to Surrey (particularly in relation to the arts) e.g. Mary Watts, Dame Ethel Smyth, Gertrude Jekyll, Marion Wallace Dunlop;
  • Networks such as Ferguson’s Gang, Surrey Hills Group, Surrey Pilgrimage Group, and women who organised suffrage marches;
  • Sociological theories of women’s suffrage;
  • Contributions of women of colour to suffrage movements in Britain and globally;
  • Art (both historical and contemporary) inspired by women’s suffrage.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for one-hour roundtables of 3–5 participants. We encourage proposals from postgraduate students and independent scholars in addition to institutionally-affiliated established academics.

Planned activities include a panel discussion featuring artists who have been active in performing and creating works based on women’s suffrage and some of its key figures; a recital of the music of Dame Ethel Smyth; and a visit to the nearby Watts Gallery. We envisage that an edited publication will be developed from papers presented at the conference.

Abstracts of not more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 26 January 2018 to suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk. Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 23 February 2018. A limited number of student bursaries may be offered to offset costs of attendance.

Conference Committee: Christopher Wiley, Charlotte Mathieson, Lucy Ella Rose (co-chairs)

Enquiries: suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk

Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research


Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16-17 April 2018, Senate House, London

*NB This event has now been expanded to a two-day conference*

Registration: https://store.surrey.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/fass-faculty-of-arts-social-sciences/conferences/autoethnography-selfreflexivity-and-personal-experience-in-music-studies-1617-april-2018

Provisional Programme: https://christopherwiley.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/imr-conference-programme-provisional-16-17-04-18.pdf

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.


20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

Mapping the Musical City

Mapping the Musical City – a historically savvy symposium

Friday 2 February 2018, Institute of Musical Research, Senate House, London

Proposals due: Wednesday 13 December 2017, 1200 GMT

Keynote speaker: Samuel Llano (University of Manchester)



This symposium, in association with the School of Advanced Studies, addresses mapping as both an object and method of musicological enquiry. Inspired in part by the “spatial turn” in the humanities at large and fuelled by the increasing accessibility of Geographic Information Systems software, musicologists can now visualize and analyse complicated trends across time and place with greater ease than ever before. Yet, the ideological and epistemological implications of different mapping tools and techniques remain underexplored. The aim of this symposium is to situate recent projects within a longer history of cartographic practice in music studies.


By taking a historical perspective on the mapping of musical cities this symposium will raise questions on two fronts. Firstly, it will acknowledge cartography as a factor in past musical practice, asking, for instance: how the active “zoning” of civic space regulated performers’ livelihoods; how tour guides and travel writing predetermined listening experiences; and how the policing of bodily display and alcoholic consumption have made entertainment venues a focus for surveillance and control. The second set of questions relates to the mapping techniques available to music studies today: we will ask what is at stake in converting affective, interpersonal musical experiences into machine-readable spatial coordinates; how the problems of mapping the performing arts differ from those of mapping literary or visual culture; and how the current fascination with urban centres emerged from earlier work at the scale of the region or nation.


Please send proposals (300 words) for individual papers or panels to Jonathan Hicks (Newcastle University) at jonathan.hicks@newcastle.ac.uk. If you have an alternative format suggestion (including, say, demonstrations of current projects or discussions of cartographic texts) feel free to get in touch to discuss your ideas.


Proposals from early career scholars are particularly encouraged. Thanks to sponsorship from Nick Baker there is a modest fund to support travel to the event, particularly for anyone attending from overseas; if you are interested in this support, please say so in your application.


Finally, please note the quick turnaround for this call: the deadline for proposals is Wednesday 13 December 2017, 1200 GMT and decisions will be made later that week.

The Study of Musical Experiences: Perception and Diversity


We are delighted to announce our Autumn Course, which will run from November 28th-December 1st 2017 at the University of Bergen. The event is organized by the Grieg Research School in Interdisciplinary Music Studies (Western Norway).

The theme for this course is “The Study of Musical Experiences: Perception and Diversity”. More info available here. Continue reading “The Study of Musical Experiences: Perception and Diversity”

Terminology research in musicology and the humanities


CONMUSTERM: Terminology research in musicology and the humanities

Conference dates: May 25 – 26, 2018

Venue: University of Zagreb, Music Academy; Trg maršala Tita 12, Zagreb, Croatia



  • Synchronic and diachronic approaches to music terminology
  • Music terminology in reference literature and teaching materials (with special reference to recently developed terminology of music theory, composition, music technology and ethnomusicology)
  • Terminology standardization in the humanities (e.g. in musicology, ethnomusicology, linguistics, art, philosophy, history, anthropology, ethnology, archaeology, etc.)
  • Humanities within traditional and contemporary terminological theoretical approaches
  • Terminology and the humanities in a multilingual context: linguistic and cultural specificities
  • Terminology of the humanities in multilingual terminological databases
  • Specific terminological issues in minor languages
  • Other related topics


Official languages of the conference

Croatian and English


Plenary speakers

Markus Bandur, Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz / National Library in Berlin

Gerhard Budin, University of Vienna, Centre for Translation Studies


Submission information


Types of contributions

  • full papers (20-minute talk followed by 10 minutes for discussion and change of rooms)
  • panel discussions (group related papers for up to 5 participants, duration 45 – 60 minutes)
  • posters

Submissions of abstracts for full papers should present either complete research, or research in progress where at least some substantial results have been achieved. Work in progress which has yet to produce results can instead be submitted as a poster abstract. Both categories of abstracts should not exceed 500 words.

Submission of abstracts of 500 – 800 words for panels are to be submitted by the panel convenor(s) on behalf of all speakers, with an introduction specifying the relationship between the topics before details on individual presentations (including names and affiliations of all speakers) are given.


Conference fee

Fees include conference materials, lunch and refreshments for both conference days, but not accommodation:

  • active participants 70 EUR
  • participants without presentation 30 EUR
  • conference dinner 20 EUR (not included in the conference fee)



Selected peer reviewed papers will be published following the conference within a special issue of the journal Rasprave of the Institute of Croatian Language and Linguistics.



University of Zagreb, Music Academy, Department of Musicology

Institute of Croatian Language and Linguistics, Zagreb

The conference is financed by the Croatian Science Foundation (HRZZ) within the research project Conmusterm.

Organizing Committee

Nikša Gligo (President), Tomislava Bošnjak Botica, Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Krešimir Sučević Međeral, Ana Ostroški Anić

Contact: conmusterm@muza.hr

Conference website: http://bit.ly/2wHIade



Researching Performance, Performing Research – Collaborations and Confrontations

October 27-29, 2017


The purpose of this symposium is to explore the manifold contexts in which interactions between musical performers and scholars take place, and the different modalities in which such interactions may be conducted. In both the past and the present these have included productive collaborations and shared visions, but also genuine confrontations. The symposium will address not just the overlaps between the activities of performers and scholars and between the different types of knowledge that undergird both musical performance and the performative act of doing research, but also the disagreements, tensions, and failures that may arise when bringing these practices into dialogue.

The symposium will be structured around five basic themes:
Theme 1: Instruments of Performance Research
Theme 2: Sources of Performance Knowledge
Theme 3: Scholars and Performers Interacting
Theme 4: Institutional Cultures and Collaborations
Theme 5: Power, Prestige, and Embodied Knowledge

We have invited presentations from a wide range of musical scholars and performers, those with a pluralistic outlook on performance and research. Pre-formed sessions will contain both presentations and performances by the symposium delegates, with the aim of achieving a symbiosis of these two basic elements. The keynote address will be given by the composer and vocalist Jennifer Walshe, a world-renowned performer of contemporary art, in collaboration with the accordeonist Andreas Borregaard.

The symposium will take place at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ (Piet Heinkade 1, 1019 BR Amsterdam), which is very close to Amsterdam Central Station

The final programme and abstracts can be found here

Please register for the symposium here

We have made arrangements with two hotels in Amsterdam, where you can book a room at a reduced rate. Click here for more information.

Questions can be addressed to the symposium conveners: john.koslovsky@ahk.nl; michiel.schuijer@ahk.nl

The organizing committee
Hans Fidom (VU University/Orgelpark)
John Koslovsky (Conservatorium van Amsterdam/Utrecht University)
Julia Kursell (University of Amsterdam)
Olga Panteleeva (Utrecht University)
Michiel Schuijer (Conservatorium van Amsterdam)
Floris Schuiling (Utrecht University)