Music and Art in Pandemic

Organiser: University of Arts, Târgu Mureș
Abstract/proposal deadline: March, 8, 2021
Registration form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSePnvldXjIoFUc5xWhgKsw0qVKGrm7xevWAGnQRGfX_YZWKsA/viewform?usp=sf_link
contact:symbolonjournal@gmail.com

Unexpectedly emerging in everyday life, the pandemic has dramatically changed our social lives. The condition of survival has become the renunciation of such natural forms of human interaction that we sometimes fear that in order to preserve our existence, we risk losing our humanity. The arts that existed and manifested in the context of the meeting – performance, concert, recital, one-man show, but also exhibitions or installations –­ became septic, and artists were deprived of their audience. Art education has was exiled online. But artistic creation could not be hindered. Seeking to survive and express themselves, the artists followed their spectators to the online media adapting existing forms and looking for new formulas that would bring them closer to the audience. Also, pandemic and isolation became inspiration itself.

Music and Art in Pandemic, a conference targeting the art of music, and the arts that connected with music, wants to record the artistic, social, managerial and educational experience of this pandemic year, as well of the similar situations in the history of epidemics. We invite you to participate, answering current questions about the condition of the visual artist, choreographer, director, critic, musician, composer, performer, teacher – How is the spirit of these times reflected in contemporary art? Online versus “real” art, live performance versus recording, online courses versus classroom teaching? Quo vadis music? Quo vadis art? Are the artistic options, choices, attitudes limited? What are the artistic solutions for coping or full expression? Are they only temporary or can be perennial?

The conference is organised by the University of Arts, Târgu Mureș. We accept for presentation scientific studies but also reports, case studies, reviews, analyses, journals or essays in the following languages: English (preferably), Romanian, French and Hungarian. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of Symbolon, a journal indexed by CEEOL, Index Copernicus, Crossref and evaluated in category B by the Romanian National Council for Scientific Research (CNCS).

The conference will take place online, between March 18-19, 2021. Registration deadline is March 8, 2021. For more information, please contact us at symbolonjournal@gmail.com.

Music as Heritage: from Tradition to Product. An interdisciplinary course about music as heritage, with a focus on Béla Bartók – theory and practice

https://summeruniversity.ceu.edu/music-as-heritage-2021

Central European University‘s Summer Program hosts this course from June 28 to July 7, 2021 in Budapest, Hungary. The course aims to provide insight into the methodology and approaches of modern musicology as an integral part of heritage studies. We use music as a tool for analyzing and describing social changes, the interaction of state policies, culture, cultural heritage, and audience. The course builds on a highly interdisciplinary academic approach to modern musicology.

The complex theoretical and practical aspects will be taught in the format of lectures, seminar discussions, library research during a 9-day intensive summer course in Budapest. The course also includes a field trip and an individual project development program.

The course relies greatly on both CEU lecturers, Bard College and SOAS faculty members, and leading scholars in the field such as Jonathan Stock from University College Cork as well as Martin Stokes from King’s College London.

We invite applications from both practicing professionals and graduate students and junior researchers active in the field of research and teaching of related subjects (musicology, ethnography, heritage studies in its broadest sense, management, marketing and tourism studies, minority studies, etc.). Advanced undergraduate students will also be considered.

Application deadline: February 14, 2021

Congress on Sound, Music and Musical Instruments

DATE: 2-3-4 of October 2020
INFORMATION: https://congressorganimusic.wixsite.com/co2020oc

THEME: The general theme chosen for this year is: “SOUND GENERATION: environment and music in generations of sound creation”, with all papers related to organological and sound matters being highly welcome. 
WHERE: Castelo Branco – central Portugal
LIMIT DATE FOR PROPOSALS: 15 September

Dear all,
we are pleased to be able to organise the ANIMUSIC Congress in 2020, in spite of the known issues we all have been facing during this year.
In the region chosen to hold our congress, there has hardly been any case of covid-19. Besides many good reasons, of which having a low population density is one of them, the air is not polluted, there is no traffic nor confusion on the streets, life quality is known to be very high. There are mountains, forests, ecological farms, self-sustainable agricultural systems (like ours in the headquarters of ANIMUSIC: Quinta da Lira), pure crystalline water fountains and rivers, with beautiful river-pools or beaches and lakes where we all go swim (water we can drink !). Besides these natural healthy conditions, in Portugal people respect the general governmental health policies, wearing masks in public closed places, keeping distance, different “in” and “out” paths, and limiting the number of people in social gatherings. Here, in Castelo Branco, the hospital created a detached alley for treating contaminated patients, fearing a full epidemic everywhere, which did not happen – in fact, the very few isolated cases  from visitors to the region were immediately taken care of, and either submitted to home-isolation or transported to specialised institutions. Cases of death “with” virus (not “from” the virus) were minimal: the serious problematic cases were from other diseases.
We are sorry to have heard of worrying publicity regarding Portugal – which led to the creation of travel limitations or quarantine obligations which were not realistic. These last bans, and the earlier general European cancellation of public events, provoked serious limitations to the organization of concerts, conferences or other initiatives, and we all know the damage it caused to the artistic world (and many other worlds), and consequently to musical instruments technicians and all related professionals. We try to go forward with positivism.
We are preparing our event with all precautions: part of the presentations or concerts will be in a large hall, with people respecting the imposed law regulations (sitting distance, masks, provision of disinfectant liquids, special hygienisation of the spaces, etc.), and part of the presentations, weather allowing, will be in open gardens.
We have sent to private contacts a first Call for Papers, to have an idea of the response of potential participants. We are happy to have had a number of proposals which allow us to set up the conference with a good core of participants.
We have thus decided to make a full public Call for Papers, waiting for a while before doing it, having been observing the evolution of the ‘epidemic’ and the various governmental decisions, and so proposing the deadline to the 15th of September. If you are interested in physically participating, please send your proposal asap, so we have a full notion of the program possibilities (we try to have various recitals, in different spaces, to allow visitors to enjoy the different marvels of each place – palaces, parks, castles, etc.). We are also planning a complimentary tour in the region, with a visit to a special historical organ in a village with difficult access. And, as usual, a wonderful delicious banquet.
Please read more about the Call for Papers, transportation, and other information, at the website created for this Congress: link.


Welcome to ANIMUSIC-Portugal.
With warm good wishes,

Patricia Bastos

ANIMUSIC team


Re-envisaging Music: Listening in the Visual Age

Siena – Accademia Musicale Chigiana
10-12 December 2020

Keynote Speaker Prof. Leslie Korrick
(School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, York University, Toronto):
“Listening in the Age of Sound Art”

Music and images, seeing and hearing have always been inextricably linked. Even when more autonomous concepts of music developed at various times through the centuries, they arguably served to keep at bay the ever-present visual dimensions of the act of listening. When we listen to music, do we just listen? When we see a painting, or anything else, do we just watch?

The last few decades, however, have witnessed the advent of an ever more pervasive visuality. From the development of technology to social media to special effects, seeing is foregrounded like never before. What does this mean for music? How do music’s materialities answer to the materialities of visual objects and arts? How does music answer to the demands of pictures? Do these new developments affect our listening and performance experiences? What categories are particularly useful to explain the connections between musical and visual domains? How are different musical traditions, from “classical” music and opera to jazz, popular and folk music being re- envisaged?

Possible topics for consideration include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • live performance
  • site-specific performance
  • installations/sound art
  • video performance
  • live broadcasting
  • pre-existing music as soundtrack
  • historically informed listening
  • places/spaces for performance
  • urban musicology

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

A selection of the conference papers will be published in the 2021 volume of Chigiana. Journal of Musicological Studies (https://journal.chigiana.org/).

Please send proposal to chigiana.journal@chigiana.org  by 25 June 2020.

Proposals should include:
– Title of paper
– Name of speaker(s)
– Institutional affiliation
– An abstract of c. 300 words

The papers should not exceed 30 minutes in duration.

Conference Committee: Antonio Cascelli, Tim Carter, Laura Leante, Allan Moore, Christopher Morris, Emanuele Senici

Organizing Committee: Nicola Sani, Stefano Jacoviello, Susanna Pasticci

The conference is organized within the 2020 Chigiana Project, Reshaping the Traditions. The project aims to explore the impact of the concepts of tradition in contemporary music culture, combining educational opportunities, music production and scientific research.

We are aware that there are still uncertainties in the current scenario; we will constantly monitor the situation and the measures that the Italian and other governments put in place and we hope that by December 2020 it will be possible to travel, so that the conference may go ahead as planned and we can meet in Siena. However, if necessary, we will be running the conference online.

The Motherland Resurrected: Manifestations of Nationalism in Music Since the End of the ‘Short Twentieth Century’.

POSTPONED – Due to the ongoing Coronavirus crisis, this symposium is rescheduled for 2021. Confirmation of new date and new submission deadline will follow.

Venue: Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge
Date: 15 May 2020
Submission Deadline: 24 March 2020
Keynote speaker: Dr Ilana Webster-Kogen (SOAS University of London)

This symposium invites academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students from across the local community to explore and unpick how musical practices in the last thirty years have corresponded to and helped construct national self-identification, considering also how they may have problematised traditional conceptions of national identity.


Nationalism, among other concepts related to one’s identity with regard to ethnicity and the nation-state, is notoriously hard to define, as Benedict Anderson suggested in Imagined Communities (1983). Not long after Anderson’s infamous and thought-provoking publication, there was an upsurge of interest in nationalism in the early 1990s, following the revolutions of 1989, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the outbreak of nationalist wars in Yugoslavia and Rwanda.


It could be suggested that since the end of the Cold War, numerous detailed and thoughtful investigations into nationalism have somewhat exhausted the topic’s scholarly potential. Recent events and socio-political trends across the world, however, have seen new manifestations of nationalism that do not conform to conventional models. This suggests that nationalism is a persistent and dynamic phenomenon that needs continuous (re)investigation, with scholars and the media questioning if it is still on rise, whether the Second Cold War has begun or, in fact, whether the first one ever ended.


Thirty years after the 1989 revolutions, at a time when countries continue to write their controversial histories, we consider that it is the ideal moment to revisit the topic of nationalism and ask questions that take lessons from the past and critically analyse the present. Culture is the mirror of society and as music per se, unlike more verbal and visual art forms, lacks semantic meaning, it reflects its social situation in more subtle ways.

We encourage scholars across music studies to explore the relationship between nationalism and music, examining its potential for political mobilization and the causality between musical evocations of conceived national identity and political action and activism. We invite scholars, including those whose previous work is purely historical, to apply existing knowledge and methodologies to contemporary case studies of nationalism from all over the world. In so doing, this symposium aims to cultivate and nuance our understanding of how present and diverse political conditions and requirements are (re)defining conceptions of nationalism and how these are being mediated and problematised through various and disparate musical-cultural practices.


We invite proposals for individual or co-authored paper presentations and lecture recitals to musicandpolitics.cambridge2020@gmail.com. Please include a short biography of no more 150 words with your submission. The submission deadline is 24 March. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 31 March.


Guidelines for proposal submission:
Individual/co-authored paper presentations (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion) or lecture recitals (10 minutes lecture + 10 minutes recital + 10 minutes for discussion):
• Title and abstract of up to 300 words


If you are not interested in presenting but would still like to attend, please notify the organisers, Eirini Diamantouli and Ekaterina Pavlova, at musicandpolitics.cambridge2020@gmail.com.

Young Musicology Belgrade 2020. Shaping the Present by the Future: Ethno/musicology and Contemporaneity

The Institute of Musicology of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts is pleased to invite proposals from PhD students and researchers who have obtained their PhD degree no more than five years ago, for an international conference Young Musicology Belgrade 2020. Shaping the Present by the Future: Ethno/musicology and Contemporaneity. The conference is to be held at the Serbian Academy of Arts and Sciences in Belgrade, from 24 to 26 September 2020.

With the idea of the crisis of humanities as our starting point, we ask the following question: what is the place of ethno/musicological thought in the contemporary world? The notion of contemporaneity, while constantly provoking theorization, provides us the opportunity to self-reflect and analyze our own methodologies, strategies and scientific challenges in the present moment. 

What is happening in ethno/musicology after modernist historicism and its postmodern critical self-examination in movements such as the New Ethno/musicology? Are the familiar methodologies still relevant, have they improved or changed, and in what ways? How can we establish fruitful inter/transdisciplinary collaborations between ethno/musicology and other humanities, social or natural sciences? What is the impact of technology and media in today’s musicology and ethnomusicology? These are just a few questions faced by the humanities by the contemporary world, and the aim of our conference is to draft possible answers by giving voice to the young experts in our fields.

We invite PhD students and young scholars to reflect upon these topics, and share their methodologies, experiences and challenges in dealing with various subjects of contemporary ethno/musicology. The starting points of our conference include, but are not limited to:

  • contemporary challenges in ethno/musicology;
  • methodology of contemporary ethno/musicology;
  • the future of ethno/musicology;
  • inter/trans-disciplinary collaborations;
  • ethno/musicology and technology;
  • ethno/musicology and media.

Keynote speakers:

  • Dr. Selena Rakočević (Department of Ethnomusicology, Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia)
  • Dr. David Beard (School of Music, Cardiff, UK)

Submission process

Please click on the following link to download the Application form:   https://drive.google.com/file/d/1V14Spc2WxeRQpAG9U1jSl-cuN7ilXAf3/view?usp=sharing.

The proposals should be sent to the Organizing Committee (youngmusicology2020@gmail.com) by April 1, 2020 (receipt of proposals will be acknowledged by email). We also encourage panel proposals; please provide a short description of the session in addition to individual abstracts and biographical notes.

Proposals will be reviewed by the conference committee and the results will be announced by May 1, 2020.

Conference fee: 30 Euros.

The official language of the conference is English.

For any further information please contact Organizing Committee.

Programme Committee:

Dr. Miloš Zapletal (Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Historical Sciences, Opava, Czech Republic)

Dr. des. David Vondráček (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany)

Dr. Veselka Tončeva (Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Studies, Sofia, Bulgaria)

Dr. Michael Fuhr (University of Hildesheim, Center for World Music, Hildesheim, Germany)

Dr. Ivana Tomić Ferić (Arts Academy University of Split, Split, Croatia)

Dr. Jelena Novak (CESEM, NOVA University, Lisbon, Portugal)

Dr. Ana Hofman (Institute of Culture and Memory Studies ZRC SAZU, Ljubljana, Slovenia)

Dr. Lidia Ader (The Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Memorial Museum-Apartment, St. Petersburg, Russia)

Dr. Dragana Stojanović-Novičić (Faculty of Music, University of Arts, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Iva Nenić (Faculty of Music, University of Arts, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Katarina Tomašević (Institute of Musicology SASA, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Ivana Medić (Institute of Musicology SASA, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Danka Lajić Mihajlović (Institute of Musicology SASA, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Srđan Atanasovski (Institute of Musicology SASA, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Marija Dumnić Vilotijević (Institute of Musicology SASA, Belgrade, Serbia)

Dr. Ivana Vesić (Institute of Musicology SASA, Belgrade, Serbia)

*Young Musicology Belgrade is the third conference in the series that began with the Young Musicology Prague conference, organized by Department of Music History, Institute of Ethnology, of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in 2016, and followed by the Young Musicology Munich conference in 2018 that was held at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.

Narrating Musicology: Reviewing the History/Histories of Musicology

Institute of Musicology, University of Bern, October 1st – 4th 2020

In November 1996, a musicological colloquium was held at University of Bern under the title Musikwissenschaft – eine verspätete Disziplin? (‘Musicology – a Delayed Discipline?’). The discussions and outcomes that took place were then published four years later in an anthology of the same title, edited by Anselm Gerhard. The aim of both the conference and the publication was to focus less on specific key people or institutions, and instead foreground general tendencies within the history of musicology: from its beginning in the late 19th century until the time of publication and with a scope also beyond the German-speaking world. Even if relatively late, this approach proved essential for considering the history of the musicological discipline as an object of study in itself.
More than twenty years later, and in light of the upcoming 100 years’ anniversary of the Institute of Musicology, Bern, which will take place in 2021, we now take the opportunity to once again reflect on these issues:
– What is the current state of the history of musicology as a discipline?
– How has the reflection on musicology changed current research as well as teaching contents?
– Can musicology still be understood as a “delayed discipline”?
Traditionally, musicology has been divided into three strands: historical musicology, systematic musicology and ethnomusicology. Additionally, related subjects – such as music theory and music pedagogy – have had an important impact on current research on the history of the discipline. The result of this, however, is that multiple and at times even isolated histories of musicology have developed. This conference focuses on these various narratives and aims at encouraging an inter- as well as intra-disciplinary dialogue.
The Bernese colloquium twenty years ago focused on the field of tension in musicology “between belief in progress and rejection of modernity”. The discrepancy between international orientation and national chauvinist tendencies, which were both present in the 1990s, were also addressed. The present conference asks, however, is this still the case today? It further queries whether the disclosure of the various narratives, as well as the culturally specific contradictions within the various sub-disciplines have changed the self-perception of musicology as a whole. How important are national factors in shaping the principal focus of the discipline’s history nowadays? This conference focuses on the various narratives that have evolved within our field and questions the motivations which have led to these various regional histories. Therefore, the focus shall be extended beyond Western academic perspectives to a more global, and thus multifaceted approach.
Another important aspect of this conference is the question of why we should study the history of our discipline at all.
– What kind of interaction is at play when on the one hand we focus on disciplinary self-reflection and on the other, on our objects of study?
– What are the objects of study of the history of academic disciplines?
–  On the topic of musicology’s protagonists: who is responsible for narrating the histories of musicology?
–  Is the historiography of disciplines an area of study where methodological and content-related interpretation can be applied?
– How much power do various institutions have in shaping and constructing the narratives surrounding musicology?
–  What roles do these narratives play in shaping the identities of scientists, institutions and various schools of thought?
– How can musicologists deal with the history of musicology in the digital age?
The conference aims to provide a platform where discussions can happen across different generations and between the various sub-disciplines of musicology, music theory and music pedagogy.
The conference’s core-topics are:
– Reflections on the various histories within musicology (regional, national and international, as well as inter- and intra-disciplinary practice)
– The interaction between musicology’s self-reflexion and our objects of study (protagonists, methods, institutions, the digital age)
We invite you to send your proposals (max. 300 words) for one of the following categories: individual papers (20 minutes plus 10 minutes of discussion);  Panels (3 related papers of 1.5 hours in total); Poster presentations;  Roundtables (4 shorter presentations of 15 minutes each plus a chaired discussion; 2 hours in total); Presentation of films, audio or other media.
Please submit your abstracts to narratingmusicology@musik.unibe.ch by the 16th of February 2020. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously and should therefore not contain the names of the authors. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of March 2020.
Further information:
www.narratingmusicology.home.blog

Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology. EAA 2020.

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

Rupert Till (and Raquel Jiménez and Margarita Díaz-Andreu)

Prof. Rupert Till PhD FHEA CMgr MCMI
Professor of Music
Associate Dean for International
School of Music, Humanities and Media
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield | Queensgate | Huddersfield | HD1 3DH
http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=smusrt
http://rupertchill.wordpress.com

Music and Change Before and After 1990

Baltic Musicological Conference 2020

MUSIC AND CHANGE BEFORE AND AFTER 1990

Vilnius, 10–12 September 2020

CALL for papers to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020

  • Organized by the Department of Music History at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, the Lithuanian-Polish research project “Music of Change: Expression of Liberation in Polish and Lithuanian Music Before and After 1989” and the Musicological Section of the Lithuanian Composers’ Union

The employment of music as a form of cultural opposition and transformative power is a multifunctional process that implies an extension of the thematic and disciplinary borders to the complex relations of the music’s cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts. However, such approach requires to provide a space for deep engagements in music and its various worlds overcoming a simplified understanding of musical practices as a reflection of social structures and political processes. As Jacques Attali writes on the relationship between music and societal structures, music “makes audible the new world that will gradually become visible, that will impose itself and regulate the order of things; it is not only the image of things, but the transcending of the everyday, the herald of the future” (Attali 1985).

Baltic Singing Revolution – “revolution by singing and smiling” (Heinz Valk 1988) – is a widely known example of the public expressive cultural practice which had a stimulating effect on cultural imagination and political change. Remembering the year 1990, so important but not limited to national histories of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, the Baltic musicological conference 2020 aims to acquire new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the ways in which the musical expression of liberation and musicians’ networks contributed to political and cultural change before and after the end of the Cold War. In what ways the musical practices contributed to formation, negotiation and transformation of sociocultural identities and changing collectivities? What has been the relationship between the processes of cultural and political change before and after 1990? What were prominent ideas, landmark cultural texts and influential individuals who have had a formative and transformative power in these processes? To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the 20th–21st-century music and change in the widest sense, we invite the proposals for the Baltic musicological conference 2020, to be held at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre in Vilnius 10–12 September 2020. The conference will include international guest speakers Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Gintautas Mažeikis (Vytautas Magnus University) and Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University).

Academic committee

Małgorzata Janicka-Słysz (Academy of Music in Kraków), Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli (Lithuanian Composers’ Union), Rima Povilionienė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre), Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University), Iwona Sowińska-Fruhtrunk (Academy of Music in Kraków), Rūta Stanevičiūtė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre)

Local organizing committee

Zita Abramavičiūtė, Ingrida Jasonienė, Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli, Rima Povilionienė (vice-chair), Rima Rimšaitė, Rūta Stanevičiūtė (chair), Judita Žukienė

Submission

The conference language is English. There will be two options: individual papers and panels (of 3 or 4 presenters).

  • Papers: We invite abstracts of no longer than 300 words, including keywords and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.
  • Panels: The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (300 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. 

Please submit proposals as a doc/odt/rtf attachment to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020. The following format should be used:

  • Name, affiliation and contact email address
  • Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper)
  • Title of presentation
  • Abstract (300 words maximum; in the case of panels, include a general abstract followed by individual abstracts, in total 1200 words maximum)
  • Keywords (5 maximum)
  • References (optional, 10 maximum)
  • CV (100 words maximum; in case of panels, CVs of all participants)

Accepted speakers will be informed by mid-April 2020.

The conference registration fee both for Oral Presenters and Non-Presenters/Listeners – 30 EUR, student registration fee – 15 EUR, onsite payment.

The fee includes attendance to the conference sessions, conference material, coffee breaks and conference reception, social program events.

Information about registration and accommodation will be sent after acceptance of proposals.

The selected papers will be invited for publication in the international peer-reviewed scientific journal “Lithuanian Musicology” (indexed in SCOPUS, EBSCO, RILM).

The conference organizers look forward to receiving your submissions!

More info:

Prof. Dr. Rima Povilionienė

balticconference2020@lmta.lt

Low End Theories: Understanding Bass Music and Culture Study Day

It’s my great pleasure to formally open the Call for Participation for Low End Theories: Understanding Bass Music and Culture.

This will be a joint BFE/RMA Study Day at the University of Bristol next year, on Saturday 16 May 2020.

Keynote speaker: DJ Krust aka Kirk Thompson

Visit the website to read the CfP and join the mailing list for future updates: http://lowendtheories2020.wordpress.com/

The deadline for submissions is Friday 31 January 2020.

With a steadily increasing array of academic publications in the field reflecting bass music’s global popularity and value, we believe the organisation of an interdisciplinary conference on this topic in the lively city of Bristol is both timely and relevant to a broad audience.

Enquiries: lowendtheories2020@gmail.com

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/517207328794359/

Twitter: #LowEnd2020