Music and the Internet: a Joint Study Day of the RMA & BFE

– CALL FOR PAPERS –
Music and the Internet
A Joint Study Day of the RMA & BFE
University of Oxford
Saturday 8th December 2018
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Georgina Born
Roundtable Speakers: TBC

Since the turn of the millennium, music and the Internet have become increasingly entangled with one another. For many Internet users, the musical web has become an integral part of everyday life, while worldwide digitization initiatives have transformed musical production practices and modes of consumption. In their recent Music & Letters article, Georgina Born and Christopher Haworth note that the Internet ‘multiplies music’s discursive and social mediation, engendering new online entities, practices, and relations, which may themselves augment, publicize, and globalize offline forms’. Alluding to new research directions, they reason that the study of Internet-mediated music ‘necessitates interdisciplinary approaches that integrate digital methods with both ethnography and history’ (Born & Haworth 2018: 603, 647).

Responding to these developments, this BFE & RMA study day seeks to foster dialogue between musicologists and ethnomusicologists who are interested in the online mediation of music and novel methodological approaches that support its study. How is the Internet involved in the formation of musical and political subjects? What can we learn from online interactions between artists and fans, performers and audiences? Why have musical memes become a contagious aspect of popular culture in the current decade? In what ways does the Internet afford renewed interest in music making among large corporations? Who are the users that make use of the musical web, and on whose terms do they play and listen?

We invite proposals for papers of 20-minutes, which will each be followed by 10 minutes of discussion. The keynote address will be given by Professor Georgina Born and the day will conclude with a roundtable on digital research methodologies. We particularly welcome papers by graduate students and early career researchers.

Prospective paper topics may include (but are not limited to):

 The online consumption of music: YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, etc.
 The transformation of music economies and the emergence of the digital music commodity
 Emancipation, control, and the politics of Internet use
 The materialities and social meanings of digital music technologies
 Online communities and the construction of celebrity personae
 Internet-mediated music genres
 Interdisciplinary approaches to musical memes and user-generated content
 The use of smartphones for music creation and dissemination
 Internet piracy and reconfigurations of Intellectual Property
 Digital methodologies: using the Internet for ethnographic and musicological inquiry

Paper titles and abstracts of 250 words should be sent to musicinternetoxford@gmail.com by 9th September 2018.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by 7th October 2018.

Programme Committee:

Pablo Infante-Amate (University of Oxford), Edward Spencer (University of Oxford), Georgina Born (University of Oxford), Eric Clarke (University of Oxford)

Study Day Website: https://musicinternetoxford.wordpress.com/

Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music

CFP. Submission deadline: December 15, 2018

Música Analítica 2019:
Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Porto, Portugal: March 21–23, 2019

http://artes.porto.ucp.pt/pt/central-eventos/musica-analitica-2019-porto-international-symposium-analysis-and-theory-music

The Research Center for Science and Technology in the Arts (CITAR) at the School of Arts, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, invites the submission of paper proposals to Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music, taking place in Porto, Portugal, March 21-23, 2019.

The symposium promotes the notion of music as analysis and analysis as music – a gloss on “música analítica”- arguing that our discursive modes of analysis are not outside of music or simply an enriching addition we bring to it but rather integral to the way we may experience, conceive, and music. In short, implicit or explicit analysis is implicated in the way we reframe, process, and construct time and sound, including aspects such as gesture or communal experience into/as music.

The symposium’s thematic range is inclusive, welcoming submissions from a variety of perspectives on music analysis and theory (speculative, practical, historical) or attendant to the multifarious intersections with disciplines such as music history, composition, critical theory, ethnomusicology, performance, sound art, mathematics, cognitive sciences, and technology. In addition, pedagogical approaches that address methodological and social implications of music analysis are particularly encouraged.

Reflecting the scope of the meeting, the symposium will feature the following speakers:

Keynote Speakers:
Richard Cohn (Yale University)
Judit Frigyesi (Bar-Ilan University)
Sílvio Ferraz (Universidade de São Paulo)

Plenary Speakers:
Bianca Temes (Music Academy, Cluj)
Christopher Bochmann (Universidade de Évora)
Isabel Pires (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
Michiel Schuijer (Conservatorium van Amsterdam)
Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira (CITAR, ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
Moreno Andreatta (IRCAM, CNRS, UPMC-Paris)
Miguel Borges Coelho (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
Naomi Waltham-Smith (University of Warwick)
Paulo Ferreira de Castro (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
Steve Rings (University of Chicago)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
We invite scholars from various disciplines to contribute to this international symposium (the language of the symposium is English). Please send a proposal for an oral communication (20′ presentation +10′ discussion) no later than December 15, 2018, to the email: musicaanalitica2019@porto.ucp.pt. We project a response by Jan 5, 2019.

The proposal should consist of two separate pdf. files:
(1) Title of the communication and an abstract detailing your topic, approach, argument, and main findings, with a max. 350 words. Also include 5 keywords, and up to 8 bibliographic references. The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, proposal, MA2019].
(2) Information about the author(s): Name, Institutional affiliation, e-mail, title of the talk, and a short biographical note (max. 150 words). The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, info, MA2019]

__________

Organizing Committee
José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
Sofia Serra (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
Daniel Moreira (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
Paulo Perfeito (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
Telmo Marques (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)

Scientific Committee
[Plenary Speakers listed above are also SC members]
Adriana Lopes Moreira (Universidade de São Paulo)
Áine Heneghan (University of Michigan)
André Perrotta (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
António Augusto Aguiar (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
Antonio Grande (Conservatorio di Musica “G. Verdi” di Como)
Benoît Gibson (Universidade de Évora)
Carlos Caires (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
Carlos Guedes (New York University, Abu Dhabi)
Catello Gallotti (Conserv. di Musica “Giuseppe Martucci” di Salerno)
Gilberto Bernardes (INESC TEC/Univ. do Porto and Univ. de Aveiro)
Ildar Khannanov (Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University)
Jean-Pierre Bartoli (Sorbonne Université)
João Pedro d’Alvarenga (CESEM, Univ. Nova Lisboa)
John Koslovsky (Conservatorium van Amsterdam; Utrecht Univ.)
Manuel Pedro Ferreira, (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova Lisboa)
Mário Baroni (Università di Bologna)
Mattia Bergomi (Fund. Champalimaud, Center for the Unknown)
Mine Dogantan-Dack (University of Cambridge)
Nicolas Meeùs (SBAM, and IReMus)
Paulo de Tarso Salles (Universidade São Paulo)
Pedro Pestana (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
Robert Hasegawa (McGill University)
Rodolfo Coelho de Souza (Universidade de São Paulo)
Rui Penha (INESC TEC/Universidade do Porto)
Sanja Kiš Žuvela (University of Zagreb)
Sérgio Azevedo (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
Sigrun Heinzelmann (University Mozarteum Salzburg)
Sławomira Zeranska-Kominek (University of Warsaw)
Vasilis Kallis (University of Nicosia)

 

 

 

Music in the body – body in music: The body at the intersection of musical practice and discourse

      • Conference, 5th/6th of September 2019, Department of Musicology, Georg-August-University of Göttingen
    • Our body forms the basis of all musical acts, utterances and experiences. As sonic waves, music impacts the body immediately. Musical instruments vibrate through human bodily action. Notated scores become music through the bodies of their performers. The effects of a Rock’n’Roll classic manifest bodily through physical movement in dance. Despite the undeniable presence and importance of the body in music production and reception, the body has been marginalised in historical musicology. This neglect persists despite the attention to the body as medium and location of knowledge in other disciplines throughout the humanities and social sciences. The body enjoys critical scholarly discussion and analysis since the performative turn in fields such as affect-, gender- and performance-studies, and these fields are explored in popular music studies, Ethno-, and cultural musicology. But these approximations have yet to amount to a rethinking of music in terms of its corporeality. Musicology often operates within a conception of music that is anchored to autonomy aesthetics, which is characterised by a “marginalisation of the body through the autonomy of the mind” (Traudes 2012). Not only is the performing body conceived as a transparent medium, transporting the mind-driven intentions of the composer, but the listening ideal is moreover not one of bodily reaction, but intellectual reflection. Consequently, the ‘music itself’ remains within the notated work requiring a certain ideological reading. As musicologists, the current tasks facing us are to examine the effects this ignorance of the body has had on our understanding of music (history) and detailing strategies to overcome this inattention. Furthermore, the consequences of including the body in our thinking about music must be analysed and critically discussed.
    • This conference aims to open ways into a foundational critical discussion of the above, questioning how the body and (musical) knowledge can be conceptually connected. To what extent are musicological questions impacted by the topic’s prevalence in other disciplines? How can we think of the body as a central musicological category?
    • This conference will examine the bodily dimensions of historical, social, symbolical and cultural practice in music along two related sections: music production and reception. With this, the aim is to discuss how the conceptualisation of the body beyond the dualism of body and mind also helps thinking beyond musical dualisms. Understanding the body as a tool for analysis possibly allows the body to become an intersection of knowledge, agency, discourse and practice. In this respect, the body is a shared locus of musical reception, interpretation and production, and can overturn the dualism of production and reception. The conference will accommodate this idea of intersection by bringing the contributions of the two conference sections into dialogue.

1. Composing the Performance? – staging the body in and to music

    • Questions: Corporeality is perceivable in performance, in visible staging, and in performers’ behaviour while musicking. Can corporeality also be detected as a principle of expression inherent to music, as a body inscribed into (musical) text? How can the resulting blurring of composing, performing and listening body be grasped analytically? How can we understand the body as a tool for music analysis?
    • Possible topics:
      • Musical text as staging strategy for the performing body: musical notation as prescriptive medium for bodily action and movement
      • From transparent medium to en-composed body: blurring of inner-musical and performing body
      • Body as fabric and interface of performative action (sensorially, sensually or sensationally)
      • The role of the interpreter/performer in the body-mind-dualism
      • Perception and presentation of the body on stage
      • Body as analytical key concept: How are discursive norms for the body produced, how do those norms structure our perception and practice?
      • Influence of the body and its potential for movement on the development of sign systems for music notation

2. Historical configurations of listening bodies as intersecting spaces of outside and inside
Questions: How is the bodily listening apparatus related to body norms and body experiences? What relationship does the listening body have to multi-sensory outward space and to concepts of inwardness or the self?

Possible topics:

      • History of the ears and the auditive body
      • Historical construction of listening bodies: disciplining, forming, fashioning listening skills, listening knowledge and listening abilities in the context of repertoires and canons, socio-historical practice, ethical norms, political dynamics, aesthetic norms, the history of knowledge, medicine and psychology
      • bodily listening attitudes, listening roles, listening habits and listening practice
      • The bodily sensory apparatus, historically, culturally, socially located between outside and inside spaces. Sensory apparatus used as receiver, medium, communicator, black box, interface, performer, arranger, multiplier…
      • History of embodiment in sonic space
      • Production of the subject through bodily perception, history of the body-mind-dualism
      • Naturalisation and deconstruction of listening bodies

This call for papers is directed towards advanced postgraduate and doctoral students, post-docs and senior scholars. Contributions from different fields of musicology as well as transdisciplinary contributions are welcome.
Individual papers will last 20 minutes with 10 minutes of discussion. It is possible to apply with a panel proposal comprised of max. three individual 20-minute-papers. Conference languages are German and English. A conference publication is intended. Please submit a paper abstract in German or English (max. 300 words) along with a short biography (max. 100 words) until the 1st of November 2018 to one of the organisers. Contributors will be informed about paper acceptance by the end of December 2018.
Expenses for travel and accommodation may be covered depending on successful funding applications and cannot be guaranteed at this point.
We look forward to your submissions!

 

World of Bob Dylan

Overview

In 2016, the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa jointly announced the acquisition of the Bob Dylan Archive–an extraordinary collection of material that includes over 6,000 items, including recordings, manuscripts, film, notebooks and much more.  These materials have already begun to open up new ways of understanding not just Dylan and his work, but the broader history of popular music both in America and around the world.  Tulsa is already home to the Woody Guthrie Center and will soon welcome OKPOP, which will house collections related to Leon Russell, Wanda Jackson, Roy Clark, Bob Wills, and more.  The Bob Dylan Archive will thus rest at the center of a rich array of resources focused on twentieth-century popular music of all kinds.

To help advance this work, the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies, in cooperation with the Bob Dylan Archive, Gilcrease Museum, and the departments of English, Art, Music, and History, will host an international symposium on the Nobel Laureate from May 30 to June 2, 2019.  We aim to bring together scholars, critics, performers, collectors, and fans in order to help mark the arrival of the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa and continue the already lively inquiry into one of the world’s most innovative and influential artists.  The organizing committee now seeks proposals for papers, panels, and roundtable discussions on all aspects of Dylan’s work, context, influences, and legacy.

Rather than trying to work around a single theme, this symposium welcomes proposals on any topic related to Dylan’s music, art, life, and context.  We particularly encourage interdisciplinary proposals that work across fields such as literature, music, history, sociology, art, media studies, and biography.  We also welcome and encourage work in a variety of different formats including digital and artistic projects.  Keynote events will include a deep dive into the Archive’s treasures, discussions with musicians who toured with Dylan, and lectures by leading music writers and scholars.

Individual Proposals

The organizing committee welcomes proposals for 15 to 20-minutes papers and presentations.  To submit, please send a title, a 250-word abstract that summarizes the topic and complete contact information (name, email, and any institutional affiliation). The organizers will group these papers into panels.

Panel Proposals

Panels consist of three or four speakers focused on a common topic or idea.  To submit a panel proposal, the chair should send a 500-word abstract that includes a name for the session as well as presentation titles for each participant.  The chair and each proposed panelist should provide an email address and any institutional affiliation.

Roundtable Proposals

These special sessions are meant to encourage conversation, debate, and the exchange of ideas around broadly compelling topics (e.g. Cover Songs or Teaching Dylan).  Roundtables should be proposed by a single moderator and and may include up to five participants.  The focus should be on conversation among the panelists and the audience rather than on the delivery of prepared remarks.  Roundtable proposals should include 250-word summaries of the topic to be explored along with the names and email addresses of the chair and each participant.

Deadlines:

Sept 1               Submission Portal Opens

Jan 15              Paper, Panel, and Roundtable Submission Deadline

Feb 1                Registration Opens

Feb 15              Notification

For updates, please visit our website at: https://dylan.utulsa.edu/world-bob-dylan-symposium/

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/142550896607959/

 

isaScience 2018 “Participatory Approaches to Music & Democracy”

The conference isaScience 2018 is part of isa, the International Summer Academy of the mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Austria.

https://www.mdw.ac.at/isa/isascience
Conference date: 10–14 August 2018

Conference venue: Hotel Marienhof, Reichenau an der Rax, Austria

Keynote: David Hesmondhalgh, Professor for Media, Music and Culture, University of Leeds, UK

Organisers: Dagmar Abfalter, Marko Kölbl, Rosa Reitsamer, Fritz Trümpi

Over the last few decades, a rich body of literature has explored how individuals and groups use music as a resource to achieve social, cultural and political participation and to bring about social change in society. 
Studies have also investigated music’s use by political groups and parties in the past and present that impose 
authoritarian, neoliberal or even fascist political ideas. Finally, research is concerned with the promise and 
myth of democratization through technology in regard to music production, distribution and reception/appropriation.

The organisers of isaScience welcome papers on music and democracy from a wide range of disciplines 
(e.g. musicology, ethnomusicology, music sociology, cultural studies, queer studies, postcolonial studies, arts and cultural management) addressing (but not limited to) the following themes and topics:

  • Music’s role for historical revolts and revolutions, for propagating national and nationalistic identities in the long 19th century or music’s use in the name of “the people” during fascist and post-fascist periods;
  • Research on performance practices of minorities and marginalised groups that challenge and subvert 
dominant norms and classifications;
  • Democratizing dimensions of orally transmitted music traditions;
  • Grassroots, “bottom-up” and Do-it-Yourself approaches to music and performance propagated by social movements;
  • Research on music and activism: e.g. activist choirs, feminist and queer performance groups, anti-racist rock groups, singer-songwriters etc.
  • Participatory forms of “musicking” (Small) in local, translocal and virtual music “scenes”;
  • Documenting and preserving the “sounds of democracy” and “hidden” popular music’s past: studies on archives, museums and halls of fame;
  • Music, migration, border regimes and exile;
  • Representations of democracy in artistic practices (e.g. composing);
  • Research on “mediamorphosis” (e.g. electrification, digitalisation) and its effects for democratization: “new” possibilities of self-representation, modes of participation for consumers, and business models in the music and media industries;
  • Notions of “epistemic violence” (Spivak) in music research.

Please submit your abstracts (max. 300 words) for papers, panels and innovative formats and 
a short biography and institutional affiliation,

in English language until 15 March 2018 to isascience@mdw.ac.at.
Decisions on the acceptance of your proposal will be announced by 5 April 2018.

Complimentary funding for travel and accommodation
will be available to students and scholars in academic precarity.
Please submit your application after acceptance of your proposal to isascience@mdw.ac.at.

mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna will cover lunch and coffee breaks for the conference – no registration fee.
www.mdw.ac.at/isa/isascience

Iberian musical crossroads through the ages: Images of music-making in their transcultural exchanges

Fifteenth symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Iconography of the Performing Arts
organized by the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Institut d’Estudis Catalans

Barcelona, 17–19 October 2018

Iberian peninsula—the home of Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Basque, and Galician peoples—has been a significant economic and political region through the history, which had been both conquered by the powers coming from elsewhere and generating its own forces exploring and conquering other regions and cultures in the world. From the Bronze Age onwards, explorers and traders used the peninsula as the crossroad between the Mediterranean and much of the rest of the world. The Phoenicians came to Iberia in the ninth century BC, and the Greeks followed two centuries later. The Romans conquest of Hispania started during the second Punic War in 206 BC and by the time of Augustus near the entire peninsula was under the control of Rome. During the Middle Ages, Al-Andalus with its Islamic administration was open to an import of Arab knowledge, philosophy, culture, arts and music. Later on, Spain and Portugal were the strongest naval powers in the world and their overseas explorations have radically altered both the old and new worlds: Spain influenced South American and Caribbean cultures, and even the Philippines; the Portuguese travellers, traders and conquerors reached Brazil, sailed along the African coast, and arrived all the way to India, Malacca, and Macao. Through the crown of Aragon, Catalonia experienced cultural exchanges within the western Mediterranean Sea and southern Italy. In addition to the overseas networks, cultural and artistic exchanges were also occurring in Europe through commercial and political ties, and also through marriages between the royal houses. Throughout the history pilgrims walking the Camino de Santiago, or visiting the shrines of Montserrat or Fatima were bringing with them songs, dances and instruments from all over Europe.

All these and many other explorations and migrations created a fertile framework for a rich exchange of musical ideas, sounds, forms, rhythms, dances, and instruments. The Barcelona conference of the ICTM Study Group on the Iconography of Performing Arts will examine visual sources documenting transborder and transcultural transmission of musical ideas between the peoples of the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world. Papers are invited concerning the following topics:

  • Sounds of the ancient world: The Iberian cultures in an exchange with other Mediterranean traditions
  • Islamic sounds in Al-Andalus
  • Music and dances of Spanish Sephardim
  • Music along the road: Travelers and pilgrimages in Spain and Portugal
  • The Borgia family as a mediator of musical life between Iberia, Rome and the Vatican
  • Music and explorers (Columbus, Vasco da Gama, trade routes to Latin America, Asia, Africa)
  • Portuguese ethnohistoric accounts about music of Brazil, Macao, and Estado da Índia
  • Spanish encounters with music cultures of pre-Colombian America
  • Music in Catholic missions of New Spain and in the Christianization of Goa
  • Exchanges between Catalonia and kingdoms of Naples and Sicily
  • Reception of the Italian opera in Spain and Portugal
  • Zarzuela and other music theater in Latin America
  • Spain as a topos in music exoticism (opera, operetta, ballet, dance); Orientalism in Spanish art
  • Exchanges of musical instruments between Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world
  • Internal musical exchanges between the peoples of the Iberian peninsula
  • Spanish/Portuguese iconographic models used in Latin American decorative programs
  • Transcultural musical topics in the 20th- and 21st-century art
  • Proposals related to other transcultural music exchanges in the world may be also considered

English is preferred language for the conference presentations.
Abstracts of 250–300 words may be submitted before 2 April 2018 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309
zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

and

Jordi Ballester
Societat Catalana de Musicologia
Institut d’Estudis Catalans
Carrer del Carme 47
08001 Barcelona
Jordi.Ballester@uab.cat

CityMAC 2018

CityMAC 2018

5-7 July 2018, City, University of London

The City Music Analysis Conference (CityMAC 2018), sponsored by the Society for Music Analysis (SMA), will take place on Thursday 5th to Saturday 7th July 2018 at City, University of London. This international conference will feature analysis of world music, but welcomes paper proposals on any aspect of theory or analysis relating to music of any genre and historical period.

Keynote speakers

Professor Janet Schmalfeldt (Tufts University) and Professor Richard Widdess (SOAS).
Submission deadline: 5th February, 2018. Applicants will be notified by 16th March, 2018.

Proposal categories

  • Papers (20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion)
  • Paper sessions (three or four papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes per paper for discussion)
  • Roundtable discussions (up to 6 participants, each giving a short position paper, followed by a general discussion, total running time of 90 or 120 minutes)
  • Recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings (maximum duration 90 minutes)

Proposal guidelines

  • For individual papers: up to 250 words
  • For paper sessions: 250-word (maximum) summary and up to 200 words for each session participant
  • For roundtable discussions: 250-word (maximum) and up to 150 words for each panel participant
  • For recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings: 250 word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings / scores / other details of works to be included in the event (contact the organiser to discuss)

Further information for applicants

  • Only one proposal of each type is permitted per applicant
  • Proposals must be sent by email as a MS Word or pdf attachment to CityMAC2018@sma.ac.uk
  • Proposals need not be anonymised.
  • Student members and individuals without access to institutional funds are eligible to apply for an SMA Travel Bursary to help cover the costs of travel and accommodation. Further details can be found here: http://www.sma.ac.uk/grants/travel/. Please note that the deadline for application for bursaries is 7 June 2018.
  • Delegates are also welcome to apply to our Development Fund scheme to cover the cost of attending. For further details, see: http://www.sma.ac.uk/grants/development/. There is no deadline for this fund, but retrospective applications will not be considered.
  • All enquiries should be sent to Dr Shay Loya via CityMAC2018@sma.ac.uk.

Programme committee

Dr Chloë Alaghband-Zadeh (Loughborough), Professor L. Poundie Burstein (Hunter College, CUNY), Dr Esther Cavett (King’s College London), Professor Julian Horton (Durham), Dr Shay Loya (City, Organiser), Professor Danuta Mirka (Southampton), Dr Laudan Nooshin (City), Ian Pace (City), Dr Kenneth Smith (Liverpool).

Rethinking Sound 2018

CFP deadline: 31 December 2017
Notification of results: 15 January 2018
Conference dates: 30–31 March 2018
Conference website: http://mrc.hanyang.ac.kr/rethinking-sound
Venue: Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea

Keynote Speakers:

Music Research Center at Hanyang University is pleased to announce an international conference “Rethinking Sound 2018,” to be held on 30–31 March 2018 in Seoul, Korea.

Sound has long been the subject of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, but it has gained more popularity in recent decades; the sheer number of scholarly publications in what one may call “sound studies” testifies to this statement. As the ways in which sound is produced and consumed are continuing to change, we suspect that sound will be of central concern to many of us. What soundscapes are around us, and how do we react to soundscape? Is there any evidence suggesting that the way of thinking about the world is shifting away from “ocularcentric” to “aural-centric”? What are the implications of such a shift? How does (re)thinking about sound help us (re)define human subjectivity?

In attempting to answer these questions, we invite proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) on any topics related to the conference theme “Rethinking Sound,” broadly defined. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Historical/cultural/geographical soundscapes
  • History of listening
  • Human-computer interaction (HCI) with sound
  • Mediated sound/listening
  • Sound and disability studies
  • Sound and ethics
  • Sound and film
  • Sound and gender
  • Sound and noise within/outside musical works
  • Sound and subjectivity/identity
  • Sound and the body
  • Sound in video games
  • Sound, space, and mobility

We welcome proposals from scholars and practitioners as well as early-career researchers and graduate students working in all musicological disciplines.

Submissions, in English, should comprise a paper title, an abstract of up to 250 words, and a short biography of about 150 words. Please email submissions in PDF or Word format to rethinking.sound@gmail.com by 31 December 2017.

Rethinking Sound 2018 is supported by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea.

Pop – Power – Positions

Global Relations and Popular Music
3rd IASPM D-A-CH Symposium

Bern (Switzerland), 18–20 October 2018

In Nigeria, the high pressure to follow the copyright rules of the globalized pop music market restrains the use of samples in hip hop culture. In Egypt, young musicians have no credit cards, leaving them without access to the online music market. In Europe, second and third generation migrants discuss their non-European backgrounds and European identities in songs and tracks. And U.S.-produced Korean pop music (K-Pop) increasingly rivals Korean-produced K-Pop in its concern for authentic presentation.
Issues of power, position, access, and representation have shaped the production, distribution, and reception of popular music and continue to do so today. The three-day interdisciplinary conference Pop – Power – Positions highlights popular music’s embeddedness in a global world. It seeks to uncover and scrutinize the risks, challenges, and potentials of power structures, positioning, and (re)presentations in popular music. The analysis of global, postcolonial structures plays a central role in this endeavour. To date, however, music– and popular music in particular – has only rarely been studied using postcolonial perspectives.
Postcolonialism refers not only to the historical fact of colonialism and its political, geographical, cultural, and economic impact on the countries and regions involved. Rather, postcolonial studies deal with all aspects of cultural diversity, ethnic and cultural difference, and their related power structures. Colonialism as well as postcolonialism refer to hierarchies that are enacted and produced through the construction of the Other and bring about and enforce debateable concepts of representation such as gender, race, ethnic group, nation, class, and culture. In this regard, the effects of (post)colonialism can be detected not only in former colonialized and colonising countries and regions, but also in those which at first sight do not have a colonial heritage, for example Switzerland.
From its beginnings, popular music has been produced and performed in and within (post)colonial (power) structures. Postcolonial traces are, according to Johannes Ismaiel-Wendt, inherent in any popular music (2011). Current productions of popular music in different countries show that (post)colonial conditions live on in popular music, especially in a globalised world, and that musicians as well as recipients react in various ways to this situation.
The conference focuses on (global) power relations and representations of race, cultural difference, ethnicity, gender, class, and nation, including the changes and subversive strategies these may involve. Ethnographic and analytical studies of popular music in and from (former) colonised countries and regions are also welcome.

We invite papers that address the following range of topics and questions:
Power
– Who speaks in popular music? What kinds of power structures shape the production, distribution, and reception of popular music? What is the impact of the Anglophone music business on other music markets? Who speaks about popular music in the areas of marketing, advertising, journalism, fan cultures, (global) politics, and educational institutions – and what vocabulary do they use?
– Have digitalisation and digital networks led to a democratisation of musical processes, or the contrary?
– What sounds and music(s) are processed in what contexts by whom and how, and to what aim? How does the use of certain sounds/music(s) point to existing power relations, dependencies, and availability?
Place
– What role do geographies and geopolitics play in popular music-making? How do geography, world order, and power structures relate?
– In what ways can popular music exist beyond cultural, ethnic, and national geographies? What role does the relation between the Global North and Global South have in popular music?
Positions
– How do structures of power and distribution limit the access to the production and reception of popular music?
– What relevance, usability, and impact do technologies (like Digital Audio Workstations) or legal regulations (like the copyright laws) that have been developed in Western contexts have for popular music? In what ways are (post)colonial structures and power relations (re)produced therein?
– What kinds of representations do musicians use for their marketing? What traits are ascribed to music?
Postcolonialism
– What potential does popular music hold for detecting and changing (or enforcing) colonial and postcolonial power structures?
– How can postcolonial theories be made fruitful for an up-to-date understanding of popular music?
– How do musicians of different forms of popular music process a „(post)colonial experience of the world” („(post)koloniales Welterleben“, Ismaiel-Wendt) in their music?
Popular Music Studies
– How marginalised are specific popular musics within the history of popular music?
– Should or can we write a Global History of Popular Music?
– In what way is the concept of popular music in itself (post)colonial?
– What hierarchies, asymmetries or restraints can be found in inter-/transdisciplinary Popular Music Studies?

Keynote: Dr Jenny Fatou Mbaye (City University London)

Contributions on popular music that lie outside the scope of these topic areas are
welcome and will be considered if possible.

Call in GermanCall in English

Please email your abstract to daniel.allenbach@hkb.bfh.ch by 28 February 2018

More information: http://www.hkb-interpretation.ch/veranstaltungen/pop-power-positions

Centennial Reflections on Women’s Suffrage and the Arts

CENTENNIAL REFLECTIONS ON WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE AND THE ARTS

Local : National : Transnational

An international, multi-disciplinary public conference

University of Surrey, UK, 29–30 June 2018

Keynote Speakers:

  • Irene Cockroft, author of Women in the Arts & Crafts and Suffrage Movements at the Dawn of the 20th Century
  • Elizabeth Crawford, author of The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain and Ireland

CFP: deadline for submissions 26 January 2018

Conference website: www.suffragecentennial.wordpress.com

The 2018 centenary of the Representation of the People Act (6 February 1918), which granted the vote to many women in the UK, yields an ideal opportunity for sustained critical reflection on women’s suffrage. This conference seeks to explore the artistic activities nurtured within the movement, their range and legacy, as well as the relationships between politics and art. In striving for an inclusive, transnational reach, it will at the same time seek to move beyond traditional emphases on white middle-class feminism and explore the intersections between the regional, national, and global contexts for women’s suffrage with specific respect to the arts.

While proposals addressing any aspects of women’s suffrage will be welcomed, this conference will focus upon three strands:

  1. Women’s suffrage in/and the arts
  2. Women’s suffrage in Surrey and the surrounds
  3. Transnational networks and flows of texts in relation to women’s suffrage

20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of these strands, including but not limited to:

  • Late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century women’s writing on suffrage;
  • Political reflections on the arts and the cultural sphere, e.g. in music;
  • Transnational networks and mobilities of political texts and ideas, incorporating suffrage movements in other countries;
  • Politically active individuals with strong links to Surrey (particularly in relation to the arts) e.g. Mary Watts, Dame Ethel Smyth, Gertrude Jekyll, Marion Wallace Dunlop;
  • Networks such as Ferguson’s Gang, Surrey Hills Group, Surrey Pilgrimage Group, and women who organised suffrage marches;
  • Sociological theories of women’s suffrage;
  • Contributions of women of colour to suffrage movements in Britain and globally;
  • Art (both historical and contemporary) inspired by women’s suffrage.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for one-hour roundtables of 3–5 participants. We encourage proposals from postgraduate students and independent scholars in addition to institutionally-affiliated established academics.

Planned activities include a panel discussion featuring artists who have been active in performing and creating works based on women’s suffrage and some of its key figures; and a recital of music and readings. We envisage that an edited publication will be developed from papers presented at the conference.

Abstracts of not more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 26 January 2018 to suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk. Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 23 February 2018. A limited number of student bursaries may be offered to offset costs of attendance.

Conference Committee: Christopher Wiley, Charlotte Mathieson, Lucy Ella Rose (co-chairs)

Enquiries: suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk