Music and the Internet: a Joint Study Day of the RMA & BFE

– CALL FOR PAPERS –
Music and the Internet
A Joint Study Day of the RMA & BFE
University of Oxford
Saturday 8th December 2018
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Georgina Born
Roundtable Speakers: TBC

Since the turn of the millennium, music and the Internet have become increasingly entangled with one another. For many Internet users, the musical web has become an integral part of everyday life, while worldwide digitization initiatives have transformed musical production practices and modes of consumption. In their recent Music & Letters article, Georgina Born and Christopher Haworth note that the Internet ‘multiplies music’s discursive and social mediation, engendering new online entities, practices, and relations, which may themselves augment, publicize, and globalize offline forms’. Alluding to new research directions, they reason that the study of Internet-mediated music ‘necessitates interdisciplinary approaches that integrate digital methods with both ethnography and history’ (Born & Haworth 2018: 603, 647).

Responding to these developments, this BFE & RMA study day seeks to foster dialogue between musicologists and ethnomusicologists who are interested in the online mediation of music and novel methodological approaches that support its study. How is the Internet involved in the formation of musical and political subjects? What can we learn from online interactions between artists and fans, performers and audiences? Why have musical memes become a contagious aspect of popular culture in the current decade? In what ways does the Internet afford renewed interest in music making among large corporations? Who are the users that make use of the musical web, and on whose terms do they play and listen?

We invite proposals for papers of 20-minutes, which will each be followed by 10 minutes of discussion. The keynote address will be given by Professor Georgina Born and the day will conclude with a roundtable on digital research methodologies. We particularly welcome papers by graduate students and early career researchers.

Prospective paper topics may include (but are not limited to):

 The online consumption of music: YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, etc.
 The transformation of music economies and the emergence of the digital music commodity
 Emancipation, control, and the politics of Internet use
 The materialities and social meanings of digital music technologies
 Online communities and the construction of celebrity personae
 Internet-mediated music genres
 Interdisciplinary approaches to musical memes and user-generated content
 The use of smartphones for music creation and dissemination
 Internet piracy and reconfigurations of Intellectual Property
 Digital methodologies: using the Internet for ethnographic and musicological inquiry

Paper titles and abstracts of 250 words should be sent to musicinternetoxford@gmail.com by 9th September 2018.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by 7th October 2018.

Programme Committee:

Pablo Infante-Amate (University of Oxford), Edward Spencer (University of Oxford), Georgina Born (University of Oxford), Eric Clarke (University of Oxford)

Study Day Website: https://musicinternetoxford.wordpress.com/

Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music

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CFP. Submission deadline: December 15, 2018

Música Analítica 2019:
Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Porto, Portugal: March 21–23, 2019

http://artes.porto.ucp.pt/pt/central-eventos/musica-analitica-2019-porto-international-symposium-analysis-and-theory-music

The Research Center for Science and Technology in the Arts (CITAR) at the School of Arts, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, invites the submission of paper proposals to Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music, taking place in Porto, Portugal, March 21-23, 2019.

The symposium promotes the notion of music as analysis and analysis as music – a gloss on “música analítica”- arguing that our discursive modes of analysis are not outside of music or simply an enriching addition we bring to it but rather integral to the way we may experience, conceive, and music. In short, implicit or explicit analysis is implicated in the way we reframe, process, and construct time and sound, including aspects such as gesture or communal experience into/as music.

The symposium’s thematic range is inclusive, welcoming submissions from a variety of perspectives on music analysis and theory (speculative, practical, historical) or attendant to the multifarious intersections with disciplines such as music history, composition, critical theory, ethnomusicology, performance, sound art, mathematics, cognitive sciences, and technology. In addition, pedagogical approaches that address methodological and social implications of music analysis are particularly encouraged.

Reflecting the scope of the meeting, the symposium will feature the following speakers:

Keynote Speakers:

  • Richard Cohn (Yale University)
  • Judit Frigyesi (Bar-Ilan University)
  • Sílvio Ferraz (Universidade de São Paulo)

Plenary Speakers:

  • Bianca Temes (Music Academy, Cluj)
  • Christopher Bochmann (Universidade de Évora)
  • Isabel Pires (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
  • José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • Michiel Schuijer (Conservatorium van Amsterdam)
  • Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira (CITAR, ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Moreno Andreatta (IRCAM, CNRS, UPMC-Paris)
  • Miguel Borges Coelho (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Naomi Waltham-Smith (University of Warwick)
  • Paulo Ferreira de Castro (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
  • Steve Rings (University of Chicago)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
We invite scholars from various disciplines to contribute to this international symposium (the language of the symposium is English). Please send a proposal for an oral communication (20′ presentation +10′ discussion) no later than December 15, 2018, to the email: musicaanalitica2019@porto.ucp.pt. We project a response by Jan 5, 2019.

The proposal should consist of two separate pdf. files:

  • (1) Title of the communication and an abstract detailing your topic, approach, argument, and main findings, with a max. 350 words. Also include 5 keywords, and up to 8 bibliographic references. The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, proposal, MA2019].
  • (2) Information about the author(s): Name, Institutional affiliation, e-mail, title of the talk, and a short biographical note (max. 150 words). The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, info, MA2019]

__________

Organizing Committee

  • José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Sofia Serra (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Daniel Moreira (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
  • Paulo Perfeito (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
  • Telmo Marques (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)

Scientific Committee
[Plenary Speakers listed above are also SC members]

  • Adriana Lopes Moreira (Universidade de São Paulo)
  • Áine Heneghan (University of Michigan)
  • André Perrotta (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • António Augusto Aguiar (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Antonio Grande (Conservatorio di Musica “G. Verdi” di Como)
  • Benoît Gibson (Universidade de Évora)
  • Carlos Caires (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
  • Carlos Guedes (New York University, Abu Dhabi)
  • Catello Gallotti (Conserv. di Musica “Giuseppe Martucci” di Salerno)
  • Gilberto Bernardes (INESC TEC/Univ. do Porto and Univ. de Aveiro)
  • Ildar Khannanov (Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University)
  • Jean-Pierre Bartoli (Sorbonne Université)
  • João Pedro d’Alvarenga (CESEM, Univ. Nova Lisboa)
  • João Pedro Paiva de Oliveira (Universidade de Aveiro)
  • John Koslovsky (Conservatorium van Amsterdam; Utrecht Univ.)
  • Manuel Pedro Ferreira, (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova Lisboa)
  • Mário Baroni (Università di Bologna)
  • Mattia Bergomi (Fund. Champalimaud, Center for the Unknown)
  • Mine Dogantan-Dack (University of Cambridge)
  • Nicolas Meeùs (SBAM, and IReMus)
  • Paulo de Tarso Salles (Universidade São Paulo)
  • Pedro Pestana (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • Robert Hasegawa (McGill University)
  • Rodolfo Coelho de Souza (Universidade de São Paulo)
  • Rui Penha (INESC TEC/Universidade do Porto)
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela (University of Zagreb)
  • Sérgio Azevedo (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
  • Sigrun Heinzelmann (University Mozarteum Salzburg)
  • Sławomira Zeranska-Kominek (University of Warsaw)
  • Vasilis Kallis (University of Nicosia)

 

Music in the body – body in music: The body at the intersection of musical practice and discourse

      • Conference, 5th/6th of September 2019, Department of Musicology, Georg-August-University of Göttingen
    • Our body forms the basis of all musical acts, utterances and experiences. As sonic waves, music impacts the body immediately. Musical instruments vibrate through human bodily action. Notated scores become music through the bodies of their performers. The effects of a Rock’n’Roll classic manifest bodily through physical movement in dance. Despite the undeniable presence and importance of the body in music production and reception, the body has been marginalised in historical musicology. This neglect persists despite the attention to the body as medium and location of knowledge in other disciplines throughout the humanities and social sciences. The body enjoys critical scholarly discussion and analysis since the performative turn in fields such as affect-, gender- and performance-studies, and these fields are explored in popular music studies, Ethno-, and cultural musicology. But these approximations have yet to amount to a rethinking of music in terms of its corporeality. Musicology often operates within a conception of music that is anchored to autonomy aesthetics, which is characterised by a “marginalisation of the body through the autonomy of the mind” (Traudes 2012). Not only is the performing body conceived as a transparent medium, transporting the mind-driven intentions of the composer, but the listening ideal is moreover not one of bodily reaction, but intellectual reflection. Consequently, the ‘music itself’ remains within the notated work requiring a certain ideological reading. As musicologists, the current tasks facing us are to examine the effects this ignorance of the body has had on our understanding of music (history) and detailing strategies to overcome this inattention. Furthermore, the consequences of including the body in our thinking about music must be analysed and critically discussed.
    • This conference aims to open ways into a foundational critical discussion of the above, questioning how the body and (musical) knowledge can be conceptually connected. To what extent are musicological questions impacted by the topic’s prevalence in other disciplines? How can we think of the body as a central musicological category?
    • This conference will examine the bodily dimensions of historical, social, symbolical and cultural practice in music along two related sections: music production and reception. With this, the aim is to discuss how the conceptualisation of the body beyond the dualism of body and mind also helps thinking beyond musical dualisms. Understanding the body as a tool for analysis possibly allows the body to become an intersection of knowledge, agency, discourse and practice. In this respect, the body is a shared locus of musical reception, interpretation and production, and can overturn the dualism of production and reception. The conference will accommodate this idea of intersection by bringing the contributions of the two conference sections into dialogue.

1. Composing the Performance? – staging the body in and to music

    • Questions: Corporeality is perceivable in performance, in visible staging, and in performers’ behaviour while musicking. Can corporeality also be detected as a principle of expression inherent to music, as a body inscribed into (musical) text? How can the resulting blurring of composing, performing and listening body be grasped analytically? How can we understand the body as a tool for music analysis?
    • Possible topics:
      • Musical text as staging strategy for the performing body: musical notation as prescriptive medium for bodily action and movement
      • From transparent medium to en-composed body: blurring of inner-musical and performing body
      • Body as fabric and interface of performative action (sensorially, sensually or sensationally)
      • The role of the interpreter/performer in the body-mind-dualism
      • Perception and presentation of the body on stage
      • Body as analytical key concept: How are discursive norms for the body produced, how do those norms structure our perception and practice?
      • Influence of the body and its potential for movement on the development of sign systems for music notation

2. Historical configurations of listening bodies as intersecting spaces of outside and inside
Questions: How is the bodily listening apparatus related to body norms and body experiences? What relationship does the listening body have to multi-sensory outward space and to concepts of inwardness or the self?

Possible topics:

      • History of the ears and the auditive body
      • Historical construction of listening bodies: disciplining, forming, fashioning listening skills, listening knowledge and listening abilities in the context of repertoires and canons, socio-historical practice, ethical norms, political dynamics, aesthetic norms, the history of knowledge, medicine and psychology
      • bodily listening attitudes, listening roles, listening habits and listening practice
      • The bodily sensory apparatus, historically, culturally, socially located between outside and inside spaces. Sensory apparatus used as receiver, medium, communicator, black box, interface, performer, arranger, multiplier…
      • History of embodiment in sonic space
      • Production of the subject through bodily perception, history of the body-mind-dualism
      • Naturalisation and deconstruction of listening bodies

This call for papers is directed towards advanced postgraduate and doctoral students, post-docs and senior scholars. Contributions from different fields of musicology as well as transdisciplinary contributions are welcome.
Individual papers will last 20 minutes with 10 minutes of discussion. It is possible to apply with a panel proposal comprised of max. three individual 20-minute-papers. Conference languages are German and English. A conference publication is intended. Please submit a paper abstract in German or English (max. 300 words) along with a short biography (max. 100 words) until the 1st of November 2018 to one of the organisers. Contributors will be informed about paper acceptance by the end of December 2018.
Expenses for travel and accommodation may be covered depending on successful funding applications and cannot be guaranteed at this point.
We look forward to your submissions!

 

World of Bob Dylan

Overview

In 2016, the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa jointly announced the acquisition of the Bob Dylan Archive–an extraordinary collection of material that includes over 6,000 items, including recordings, manuscripts, film, notebooks and much more.  These materials have already begun to open up new ways of understanding not just Dylan and his work, but the broader history of popular music both in America and around the world.  Tulsa is already home to the Woody Guthrie Center and will soon welcome OKPOP, which will house collections related to Leon Russell, Wanda Jackson, Roy Clark, Bob Wills, and more.  The Bob Dylan Archive will thus rest at the center of a rich array of resources focused on twentieth-century popular music of all kinds.

To help advance this work, the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies, in cooperation with the Bob Dylan Archive, Gilcrease Museum, and the departments of English, Art, Music, and History, will host an international symposium on the Nobel Laureate from May 30 to June 2, 2019.  We aim to bring together scholars, critics, performers, collectors, and fans in order to help mark the arrival of the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa and continue the already lively inquiry into one of the world’s most innovative and influential artists.  The organizing committee now seeks proposals for papers, panels, and roundtable discussions on all aspects of Dylan’s work, context, influences, and legacy.

Rather than trying to work around a single theme, this symposium welcomes proposals on any topic related to Dylan’s music, art, life, and context.  We particularly encourage interdisciplinary proposals that work across fields such as literature, music, history, sociology, art, media studies, and biography.  We also welcome and encourage work in a variety of different formats including digital and artistic projects.  Keynote events will include a deep dive into the Archive’s treasures, discussions with musicians who toured with Dylan, and lectures by leading music writers and scholars.

Individual Proposals

The organizing committee welcomes proposals for 15 to 20-minutes papers and presentations.  To submit, please send a title, a 250-word abstract that summarizes the topic and complete contact information (name, email, and any institutional affiliation). The organizers will group these papers into panels.

Panel Proposals

Panels consist of three or four speakers focused on a common topic or idea.  To submit a panel proposal, the chair should send a 500-word abstract that includes a name for the session as well as presentation titles for each participant.  The chair and each proposed panelist should provide an email address and any institutional affiliation.

Roundtable Proposals

These special sessions are meant to encourage conversation, debate, and the exchange of ideas around broadly compelling topics (e.g. Cover Songs or Teaching Dylan).  Roundtables should be proposed by a single moderator and and may include up to five participants.  The focus should be on conversation among the panelists and the audience rather than on the delivery of prepared remarks.  Roundtable proposals should include 250-word summaries of the topic to be explored along with the names and email addresses of the chair and each participant.

Deadlines:

Sept 1               Submission Portal Opens

Jan 15              Paper, Panel, and Roundtable Submission Deadline

Feb 1                Registration Opens

Feb 15              Notification

For updates, please visit our website at: https://dylan.utulsa.edu/world-bob-dylan-symposium/

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/142550896607959/

 

Symposium and Workshop: South African Opera Productions after the Apartheid

Venue: Universität Bayreuth

Date:   18th– 19th October 2018

Call for Papers:

Deadline: 15th August 2018

With the end of the Apartheid era, opera – stigmatized as ‘eurocentric opera’ – became a symbol of Western dominance/colonial imposition and seemed to be dead in South Africa.

But in fact, especially the so called ‘indigenous opera’ ‘flourishes’ as something of an anachronism and can be assessed as ‘black empowerment’ (Naomi André 2018).

The writing of a historiography of opera productions in South Africa although has academically just shortly started (Donato Somma 2016; Hilde Roos 2013, 2010; Martina Viljoen 2006) and is confronted with problems of different natures: political structures, post-colonization, globalization, unstable artistic standards and institutional relations.

The ‘bloom’ of opera presents itself neither through regular performances nor through crowded theatre halls. This is a consequence of the difficult political relations of artistic production in South Africa, which are among others characterized by a lack of funding and the re-organization of the Performing Arts Councils/ National Arts Councils. The existing significant multiple theatricalities of South Africa are thereby not having a platform to present themselves. The market pressure results often in overseas productions financing the few performances in the country itself. Thereby putting itself on risk to confirm with their opera productions transferred expectations of a South African identity rather than expressing an ‘authentic’ one.

This symposium will focus on South African Opera productions. Thereby the aim of the symposium is to represent the plurality of artistic concepts that deal in different ways with the multiple challenges of political and social transformation. How can opera in South Africa be involved in the process of societal transformation in a post-apartheid society? Which new artistic concepts are needed? How does themes for the libretti change? How did language, the style of composition and orchestration transform? Which new locations for performances are found to involve new audiences? How did the aesthetics change? And how are new media used either for a new aesthetic of performances, as with e.g. ‘Lamento’ (Umculo) or ‘U-Carmen eKhayelitsha’ (Isango Ensemble), or for marketing purposes?

For the first day of the symposium presentations shall focus on one opera productions. To ‘map’ the plurality of the field presentations are invited that cover one of the following topics.

  1. South African opera productions
  • Operas of different opera companies and composers
  • Different locations of opera performances (opera house, township, film)
  • Aesthetics of the opera opus itself
  • Analysis of compositions, libretti & performances

With Prof. Dr. Naomi André (University Michigan, USA), Dr. Donato Somma (University of Witwatersrand, SA) and Dr. Lena van der Hoven (among others) some experts in the field are invited. They will present on ‘Winnie – The Opera’ (Bongani Ndodana-Breen), ‘Princess Magogo’ (Opera Africa, Mzilikazi Khumalo), ‘Heart of Redness’ (Cape Town Opera, Neo Muyanga) and ‘Romeo’s Passion’ (Umculo, Cathy Milliken).

The workshop on the second day will cover transformation processes of Opera production in South Africa focusing on the following topics:

  • Opera institutions & opera companies
  • Finances/ Funding
  • Audiences
  • Marketing
  • Political impact

Abstracts (max. 2000 characters) for 20 minutes papers along with the technical requirements for the talk and a short CV with contact details should be sent by 15th August 2018 to Lena van der Hoven (Lena.van-der-Hoven@uni-bayreuth.de). Contributions from both the humanities and social sciences are welcome (Musicology, Theatre Studies, History, Cultural Studies, Sociology). Early career researchers in particular are encouraged to contribute. The chosen speakers will be informed by 31th August 2018 and the conference programme published online at http://www.prof-musikwissenschaft.uni-bayreuth.de/de/index.html .

 

 

Clara Schumann (née Wieck) and her World

International Bicentenary Conference
Clara Schumann (née Wieck) and her World

Call for Papers

Submission Deadline: 1 December 2018

15–16 June 2019
University of Oxford

Keynote Speakers:
Natasha Loges (Royal College of Music)
Susan Youens (University of Notre Dame)

This two-day international conference provides a setting in which to reassess ClaraSchumann’s life, work, and cultural milieu within the gender-aware andinterdisciplinary climate of contemporary musicology. It is hoped that the conference will attract an international contingent of scholars working within the fields of musicology, aesthetics, gender studies, cultural history, and performance studies.

The programme committee invites papers on any aspect of Clara Schumann’s life or music, and especially welcomes contributions on the following topics:

•       Reflections on Clara Schumann’s position in musicological scholarship
•       Analytical and hermeneutic approaches to Clara Schumann’s music
•       Clara Schumann as editor
•       Clara Schumann on tour
•       Clara Schumann’s influence on the development of nineteenth-century pianism and  concert life
•       Clara Schumann’s creative relationships with members of her circle
•       Source material

Proposals are invited in the following formats:

•       Individual papers (20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of discussion)
•       Themed sessions (with four 15-minute papers, each followed by 5 minutes of discussion)
•       Lecture-recitals (40 minutes in total)

Proposals for individual papers should be no longer than 250 words, offering an overview of the topic and critical approach; those for themed sessions should take the form of a 250-word summary of the general aims of the session, together with a brief overview of each paper.

Proposals for lecture-recitals should consist of a 250-word outline of the issues and repertoire under consideration. A list of recent performances and/or recordings would form welcome supporting material.

Please send proposals as a Word document to c.s.conference@torch.ox.ac.uk, with your name and institutional affiliation included in the body of the email rather than the proposal itself.

Programme Committee:
Joe Davies (University of Oxford)
Laura Tunbridge (University of Oxford)
Susan Wollenberg (University of Oxford)

Conference website: www.claraschumannbicentenary.com

The organizers express gratitude to the following organizations for their support of the conference: The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) andMusic & Letters.

Musica Scotica Annual Conference 2019

Musica Scotica logo

The Annual Conference of The Musica Scotica Trust will take place at the Tolbooth, Stirling on Friday May 3rd to Sunday May 5th 2019. The conference organisers welcome papers on all aspects of the music of Scotland and the Scottish diaspora. In 2019, as a particular theme, we will celebrate the 60th birthday of the composer James MacMillan, who will be present at the conference. The conference will also feature a performance of MacMillan’s music.

 

We invite submissions for:

individual papers (20 min. including any music examples)

lecture recitals (30 min.) (piano available)

themed sessions (1.5 hours in total)

panel or round-table discussions (1 hour)

poster presentations

 

We would particularly welcome papers on the music of James MacMillan any aspect of his compositional processes, or on Scottish influences on his music, such as pre-Reformation choral music, Robert Carver, Gaelic psalm-singing, pibroch, folk song, music in the Catholic Liturgy etc. As in previous years, we also welcome papers on any other aspect of music in or from Scotland, and of any genre. In line with the Trust’s aim of supporting and nurturing those engaged in early career research, we particularly encourage submissions from younger researchers.

 

Please send abstracts (max. 300 words), including a title, along with a short biography (max. 100 words) as an RTF, Pages or Word file to:

musicascotica@n-ism.org

Please also use this address for any queries.

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The closing date for receipt of proposal abstracts is Wednesday 31st October and acceptances will be notified by early December. We anticipate that the cost for the full conference will be in the region of £99 (£50 – concessions) with rates for half or single day participation available. Information on local accommodation will be available for participants.

Eighth Annual Meeting | Il Gusto Italiano: Italian Style and Transalpine Exchanges in Early Keyboard Music

May 13–15, 2019
Sam Houston State University School of Music, Huntsville, Texas, U.S.A.

Call for Proposals

Admired, imitated, and heatedly debated, the concept of Italian style and taste plays an essential role in the history of keyboard music. The Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) dedicates its eighth annual meeting to all aspects of Italian style and its international reception throughout the centuries, including—but not limited to—composition and improvisation, music theory and basso continuo, instrument making, pedagogy, and temperaments. Hosted by the Center for Early Music Research and Performance (CEMRAP) at the Sam Houston State University School of Music (Huntsville, Texas), three days of events (Monday through Wednesday, May 13– 15, 2019) will include paper presentations, lecture-recitals, and mini-recitals, evening concerts, and an exhibition of publications, recordings, and instrument makers’ work. A limited number of presentations and sessions on historical keyboard topics that are not directly related to the theme of the conference, will be considered. Please submit all proposals through the following electronic submission forms:

Paper Presentation: https://goo.gl/forms/iD9QXXJ3L47e3P9W2
Lecture Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/Fr4Dn5ZUnkit4L9j1
Mini Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/ApvdZBseV8OplEEg2
Themed Session: https://goo.gl/forms/D0s7bErhvM26zp8V2

The submission deadline is EXTENDED TO NOVEMBER 5, 2018. Presentations of all formats are limited to 25 minutes. Paper and lecture-recital proposals require an abstract of no more than 2,500 characters. For mini-recitals, submit complete program information and provide links to up to two representative recordings pertaining to the proposal. Performers not intending to bring their own instruments or to make arrangements to use exhibitors’ instruments may perform on the instruments listed below. All proposals must include a short biographical statement (no more than 1,500 characters) for all presenters.

Notification of accepted proposals will be made by November 15, 2018. Presenters must be members of HKSNA and must register for the conference. Presenters must also cover their own travel and other expenses. Further information, as it becomes available, will be posted on the society’s website http://www.historicalkeyboardsociety.org.

HKSNA 2019 also welcomes exhibitors to showcase their instruments, products, and services in the conference. Furthermore, instrument makers are invited to submit proposals for maintenance workshops, etc. Please direct inquiries and proposals to hksna2019@gmail.com.

Available Instruments
Harpsichords
Flemish Single by Gerald Self, GGAA to d3, 8’8’, lute stop, 415/440 Hz, delrin plectra.
Flemish Double after Couchet by Joel Katzman, GGAA to e3, 8’8’4’, 415/440 Hz, quill plectra.
Italian Single after Celestini by Joel Katzman, GGBB to d3, 8’8’, 392/415/440 Hz, strung in brass, quill plectra.

Fortepiano
Paul McNulty after Walter & Son c. 1804, FF to c4, 430 Hz, knee levers for moderator (left) and dampers (right).

Organ
Italian “organo di legno” (all pipes cypress wood), Giovanni Pradella after 17th-century models, C–d3 chromatic, 440 Hz, 1/4 comma meantone. Disposition: Principale 8’, Ottava 4’, Decimaquinta 2’, Flauto stoppo 8’, Flauto in ottava 4’, Fiffaro (voce umana) 8’ (treble).

Program Committee
Mario Aschauer, chair, Sam Houston State University
David Kelzenberg, HKSNA president
Carol lei Breckenridge, HKSNA vice-president
Sonia Lee, HKSNA immediate past president
Maria Luisa Baldassari, Conservatorio Rossini Pesaro
Massimiliano Guido, Università degli studi di Pavia

Opera as Institution: Networks and Professions (1700–1914)

An international conference jointly organized by the Universities of Graz and Salzburg 

November 23–24 2018
Department of Musicology, University of Graz, Meerscheinschlössl, Mozartgasse 3, A-8010 Graz

Conference BoardDaniel Brandenburg (University of Salzburg), Cristina Scuderi (University of Graz), Michael Walter (University of Graz), Ingeborg Zechner (University of Graz)

The performance of opera as musical genre demands specific institutional surroundings in order to provide the means for scenic and musical representation. Indeed operatic history, ranging from its beginnings in seventeenth-century Venice to today’s globalized opera industry, is intimately bound to the history of institutions. This conference aims to gather internationally renowned musicologists whose research focuses on the institutional histories of European opera from the eighteenth to the end of the “long nineteenth century”. The intention of the conference is not to understand operatic institutions as locally distinct and isolated organizations, but rather perceive them as part of a transnational operatic network. The specific design of the conference enables to bring historical developments and shifts into account, and will lead to a deeper understanding of transnational operatic practices throughout the centuries. In addition, it will facilitate an international scholarly exchange on a complex and multifaceted topic in music history.

Conference papers will cover French, Italian, English and German operatic institutions in Europe from the eighteenth to the “long nineteenth century” and address topics such as:

  • Production systems of French, Italian, English and German opera
  • Political, legal, economic and sociocultural surroundings influencing the institution of the opera and its international exchange
  • Professions in the business of opera (composers, singers, agents, impresari, orchestra musicians, dancers, stage designers, librettists, …)
  • Networks of exchange between operatic institutions and their protagonists

 

Participation in the conference is free of charge. For passive conference participants no advance registration is required.

For further information on the program see the conference website: http://www.institutionopera.sbg.ac.at

The “Other” Voice: High Male Voices between Gluck and Rock

A Symposium of the International Gluck Opera Festival in Nuremberg, 5-7 July 2019

The international symposium, “The ‘Other’ Voice: High Male Voices between Gluck and Rock”, which will take place during the International Gluck Opera Festival in Nuremberg from 5-7 July 2019, seeks to address current research questions about the meaning, appropriation, aesthetic, and reception of high male voices in musical theater of the 18th century through to Pop and Rock.

Musical theater at the time of Christoph Willibald Gluck was shaped in large part by performing vocalists, which, particularly with the castrati in Italian opera seria, can be traced back to culturally conditioned aesthetic preferences for both high (male) voices and an ideal sonority (typical for the period), just as much to institutional factors, casting conventions, public expectations, and mechanisms of reception relating to voice, body, gender, and image.

That the object of fascination, the high male voice, is not limited to opera at the time of Gluck reveals corresponding trends in music of the 20th and 21st centuries, where high-range vocal parts for male performers are omnipresent—in theatrical and non-theatrical vocal genres alike. The casting of parts for countertenors, from Benjamin Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream to György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabreand Olga Neuwirth’s Bählamms Fest, continues to enjoy great popularity. It also represents important facets of musical theater up to the present day. Indeed, high male and falsetto voices are also of great musical and aesthetic importance in the realms of Pop (e.g., James Blunt, Justin Timberlake, A-ha, etc.) and Rock music (e.g., ACDC, Placebo, etc.). In certain instances, furthermore, the timbre generated by the falsetto voice goes beyond the aesthetics of pure sound to form part of a transgendered staging of the artistic persona (e.g., David Bowie, Freddie Mercury or Pharrell Williams).

In conjunction with a new production of Gluck’s Antigono for the International Gluck Opera Festival 2019, this interdisciplinary symposium approaches this complex subject from a variety of historical contexts, theoretical perspectives, and methodological vistas.

Possible themes include:

  • High male voices as part of the staging of artistic personalities in historical and contemporary contexts
  • Casting conventions in 18th-century musical theater
  • Aesthetics of counter song in Neue Musik as well as popular musical forms of the 20th and 21st centuries
  • Countertenors in contemporary historical performance practice
  • High male voices and the aesthetics of reception
  • Gender stereotypes in 18th-century musical theater and 20th/21st-century vocal music

Individual presentations are allocated 20 minutes, followed by 10-minutes of discussion. The conference languages are German and English. Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words in German or English, as well as a short biography (CV, research interests), to gluck–forschungsstelle@sbg.ac.at no later than 15 August 2018. Acceptance notifications will be sent out by the end of September 2018.

Concept and Organization

  • Dr. Irene Brandenburg (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)
  • Prof. Dr. Nils Grosch (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)
  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Seedorf (University of Music, Karlsruhe)
  • Dr. Ingeborg Zechner (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)http://www.gluck-forschungsstelle.uni-salzburg.at