Urban Nostalgia: The Musical City in the 19th and 20th Centuries

CFP: Urban Nostalgia: The Musical City in the 19th and 20th Centuries

EHESS, Paris

105 boulevard Raspail, Salle 13

July 3, 2020

Call for papers – deadline: 6 April 2020

https://www.ehess.fr/en/node/16865

The aim of this workshop is to explore space through music, approaching the history of the city via the notion of nostalgia. Often described as a form of homesickness, nostalgia is, by definition, the feeling that makes us wish to repossess or reoccupy a space. Such spaces appear to us as both near and distant, tangible and remote, and it seems that attempts at reclaiming them are frequently musical in nature. We know, for instance, that particular compositions have played important roles in helping people to navigate or mitigate a sense of displacement. In these circumstances, affective experiences may be bound up with trauma or joy, as is the case of song during wartime or musical imaginaries among migrants. Under other conditions, we might identify a ‘second-hand nostalgia’ in the guise of a musically-inflected tourism that seeks to reactivate (for pleasure and/or profit) the historical aura of an urban site. What are we to make of the abundance of personal, inter-personal, and propositional episodes that posit music as some kind of a bridge to the urban past?

One option is to turn to digital humanities and to recent trends in mapping the musical layers and pathways of city life. Yet, how well do such methods account for the emotional force of nostalgia and for the flickering between presence and absence that seems to characterise the musical grasp of the past? It is notoriously difficult to geo-locate affect and it is for this reason that we are looking to the kinds of mapping that music enables without the use of digital tools. How might we revisit compositions, correspondence, film music, opera, music criticism, etc. as techniques of urban nostalgia? Of course, these questions are not entirely new. But even as the so-called ‘urban musicology’ offers alternatives to traditional narratives of musical history, replacing big names with city streets, it sometimes remains unclear what the deeper relationships between musical practice and urban experience may be. We seek to address this lacuna by asking:

1) how composers, interpreters and other cultural actors have codified the city in musical terms;

2) how particular cities have afforded particular kinds of listening for particular groups at articular times; and

3) how music has contributed to the repertoire of clichés about urban identity, whether understood from ‘within’ or from the ‘outside.’

Another context for this conference is the growth of sound studies, which has made the notion of a ‘soundscape’ an unavoidable point of reference when describing links between music and urban atmospheres. In light of such work we aim to consider what the idea of a musical landscape or musicscape might offer to historically-sensitive and site-specific scholarship.

We welcome papers with a broad disciplinary grounding, including (but by no means limited to) musicology, history, cultural and sound studies, cultural geography, art history, and literature. We are also looking to include research – and researchers – that expand the geographical frame beyond Europe and Northern America, the areas favoured thus far by sound studies and technology and media studies.

We seek proposals that respond, but are not limited to the following themes:

-Music, memory, and nostalgia

-Music and mapping

-Recorded music and the city

-Musical clichés of space

-Music, space and emotions

-Music travel, and tourism

-Urban music and local vs. national identity

-Divisions of /bridges within the urban space through music

-Intermedia exchanges in the representation of the city: visual arts, literature, and film

-Site-specific musical works

-Music architecture, and urbanism

-Music and escapism: imaginary landscapes

-Mobile listening

-Music and noise pollution

Keynote lecture by Richard Elliott (Newcastle University), title tbc

Please note the quick turnaround for this call: abstracts of no more than 250 words are to be sent to musical.cities.2020@gmail.com no later than 6 April 2020. Accepted proposals will be announced on 17 April 2020. Please, include a short biography of no more than 100 words and your institutional affiliation. Proposals in both English and French will be accepted.

Scientific committee: Esteban Buch (CRAL / EHESS, Paris); Jonathan Hicks (University of Aberdeen); Gascia Ouzounian (University of Oxford); Lola San Martín Arbide (CRAL / EHESS, Paris); Christabel Sterling (University of Westminster); Justinien Tribillon (Theatrum Mundi).

Funded by the ‘Aural Paris’ project (Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 750086); organised by Lola San Martín Arbide (CRAL / EHESS, Paris).

“Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture” Conference 2020

Call for Papers!

We warmly welcome you all to a new LAHP student-led activities conference: Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture. We are excited to bring you two days of thought-provoking discussions designed to showcase new and emerging approaches to the study of gender construction and identity in American culture, addressing how femininities and masculinities are explored through the modes of music, literature, art, and wider media and cultural apparatus. The aim of this conference is to bring together PhD students and early career academics within the field of American Studies across departmental boundaries, enabling them to share their research and engage in collaborative debates surrounding the role of gender in a culturally and socio-politically tumultuous period of American culture; the twentieth century.

The conference will be held on Wednesday 10th June and Thursday 11th June 2020 in the historical and cultural epicenter of London, at King’s College London’s Strand Campus.

We specifically aim to pose the question: how can examinations of creative practices and cultural products enable a deeper understanding of regionally determined expressions of gendered identity? Whether participants challenge current discourse surrounding gender and American Studies, or discuss the ways in which we as academics shape and pursue the intersection of such disciplines, we intend to create a space wherein interdisciplinary research is produced, debated, and assessed; our call for papers encourages exchange between diverse fields of interest.

Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Articulations of gender and race, class, age, ability, sexuality, etc. in American culture, i.e. literature, music, film, audience engagement, reception, and participation
  • Exclusion and gender inequalities in American culture 
  • Collaborative practices and the creation of community
  • Cultural and social histories

How to Participate:

We are looking for 15 to 20 minute presentations, which may include formats such as films, digital artworks, lecture performances, etc.

Please submit an abstract (up to 250 words) outlining the paper’s main arguments, format, and relevance to the conference theme. Submissions should also include your institutional affiliation, paper title, 3-4 keywords, a short biography (up to 100 words), and your contact details.

Email both the proposal and biography to genderinamericaconference@kcl.ac.uk by 23.59 GMT on Wednesday, 15th April 2020.

More information is available at kclgenderinamericaconference.wordpress.com, including registration details.

Costs: Participation in and attendance to the conference is free*.
*Please note that while there are potential bursaries for travel expenses, all participants are responsible for covering the majority of costs including possible visa expenses and accommodation.

Keynote Speakers:

We are thrilled to announce our two Keynote Speakers: Dr. Rona Cran, Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre, and Assistant Professor Dr. Martin Lüthe, Assistant Professor of Culture.

Dr. Rona Cran
Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature
Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre
University of Birmingham, UK

Rona Cran is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature at the University of Birmingham, where she is also Director of the Centre for American and Canadian Studies. She is the author of Collage in Twentieth-Century American Art, Literature, and Culture (Ashgate/Routledge, 2014). Her current book project is entitled Multiple Voices: New York City Poetry, 1950-1995; she is also compiling a new anthology of New York City poetry, City of the World: Poems of New York (Fordham University Press, 2021). She has written or is writing articles on New York poetry, American women poet-editors and the mimeograph revolution, Joe Brainard and John Ashbery, Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg and collage, place, space and identity in Richard Yates, William Burroughs and eating, and William Burroughs and art.

Dr. Martin Lüthe
Assistant Professor
Department of Culture
Freie Universität Berlin (The Free University of Berlin), Germany

Martin Lüthe received his doctorate from the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture in Gießen. He is currently Einstein Junior fellow and assistant professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. Lüthe published the monographs “We Missed a Lot of Church, So the Music Is Our Confessional”: Rap and Religion (Lit Verlag, 2008) and Color-Line and Crossing-Over: Motown and Performances of Blackness in 1960s American Culture (WVT, 2011) and is working on a manuscript for Wire Writings: Media Change in the Culture of the Progressive Era.

Conference Organisers:

Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura is currently a PhD candidate in the Music Department at King’s College London supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership to pursue a thesis in Opera Studies. Previously, she completed her LLB and MSc in Political Science and Sociology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. She holds a Classical Vocal Studies Diploma from the Musical Horizons Conservatory in Athens and now performs as a Soprano. Her major academic interests are centered on gender studies, specialising in operatic femininities.

Robyn Shooter
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Robyn Shooter is a current PhD student enrolled in the Music department at King’s College London (KCL), undertaking a thesis examining constructions of identity and authenticity in alternative country music. She has previously completed an MMus in Musicology and Ethnomusicology (KCL), an MA in Cultural and Creative Industries (KCL), and holds a BA (Hons) in Comparative Literature (Queen Mary University of London). Robyn’s research is informed by her interdisciplinary background, with interests including popular culture in the United States, countercultural movements in twentieth-century America and Europe, regional identity and the American South, and nostalgic readings of Americana cultural heritage.

The Motherland Resurrected: Manifestations of Nationalism in Music Since the End of the ‘Short Twentieth Century’.

Venue: Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge
Date: 15 May 2020
Submission Deadline: 24 March 2020
Keynote speaker: Dr Ilana Webster-Kogen (SOAS University of London)

This symposium invites academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students from across the local community to explore and unpick how musical practices in the last thirty years have corresponded to and helped construct national self-identification, considering also how they may have problematised traditional conceptions of national identity.


Nationalism, among other concepts related to one’s identity with regard to ethnicity and the nation-state, is notoriously hard to define, as Benedict Anderson suggested in Imagined Communities (1983). Not long after Anderson’s infamous and thought-provoking publication, there was an upsurge of interest in nationalism in the early 1990s, following the revolutions of 1989, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the outbreak of nationalist wars in Yugoslavia and Rwanda.


It could be suggested that since the end of the Cold War, numerous detailed and thoughtful investigations into nationalism have somewhat exhausted the topic’s scholarly potential. Recent events and socio-political trends across the world, however, have seen new manifestations of nationalism that do not conform to conventional models. This suggests that nationalism is a persistent and dynamic phenomenon that needs continuous (re)investigation, with scholars and the media questioning if it is still on rise, whether the Second Cold War has begun or, in fact, whether the first one ever ended.


Thirty years after the 1989 revolutions, at a time when countries continue to write their controversial histories, we consider that it is the ideal moment to revisit the topic of nationalism and ask questions that take lessons from the past and critically analyse the present. Culture is the mirror of society and as music per se, unlike more verbal and visual art forms, lacks semantic meaning, it reflects its social situation in more subtle ways.

We encourage scholars across music studies to explore the relationship between nationalism and music, examining its potential for political mobilization and the causality between musical evocations of conceived national identity and political action and activism. We invite scholars, including those whose previous work is purely historical, to apply existing knowledge and methodologies to contemporary case studies of nationalism from all over the world. In so doing, this symposium aims to cultivate and nuance our understanding of how present and diverse political conditions and requirements are (re)defining conceptions of nationalism and how these are being mediated and problematised through various and disparate musical-cultural practices.


We invite proposals for individual or co-authored paper presentations and lecture recitals to musicandpolitics.cambridge2020@gmail.com. Please include a short biography of no more 150 words with your submission. The submission deadline is 24 March. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 31 March.


Guidelines for proposal submission:
Individual/co-authored paper presentations (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion) or lecture recitals (10 minutes lecture + 10 minutes recital + 10 minutes for discussion):
• Title and abstract of up to 300 words


If you are not interested in presenting but would still like to attend, please notify the organisers, Eirini Diamantouli and Ekaterina Pavlova, at musicandpolitics.cambridge2020@gmail.com.

Radio and the Sound of Modernism

12 June 2020

School of Music, University of Leeds

The early years of radio broadcasting coincide with a high point for aesthetic modernism in literature, film and music: this conference explores how the radio has served as both its medium and muse. Having once been considered a ‘forgotten medium’, as Edward Pease and Everette Dennis put it (Pease and Dennis, 1995), the intervening twenty-five years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in the radio, particularly in the emerging disciplines of radio studies and sound studies. In musicology, too, the radio has been examined as an institutional setting for the experimentation of, for example, the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (Niebur, 2010) and composers of elektronische Musik at the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (Iverson, 2019). Taking radio as a focus for the study of musical modernism allows several different contemporary methodologies to be brought into conversation, from science and technology studies and actor-network theory to recent theorizations of “vernacular” or “popular” modernisms (Lacey, 2018; Nemmers, 2017) and sound studies’ concern for the political valences of listening (Radano and Olaniyan, 2016).

This conference seeks to bring together scholars from such established and emerging disciplines and provide a platform for new research on radio, modernism, and technological cultures of listening more broadly, from the birth of radio to the post-war era.

We invite proposals for papers (20 minutes with 5–10 minutes for questions) and organised sessions (three thematically linked papers, totalling 90 minutes) on topics including but not limited to:

  *   Institutional relationships between radio and musical or literary modernism;
  *   Literary, filmic and musical representations of the radio and radio listening;
  *   Modernist aesthetics and the technological affordances of radio;
  *   Radio, modernism and empire, nation, region;
  *   Radio, modernism and the high/low culture divide;
  *   Radio, modernism and the aesthetics of sensation;
  *   Radio as musical instrument in aleatory music and beyond.

Titles and abstracts of 250 words should be sent as a PDF, Word Doc, or Google Doc to radioandmodernism2020@gmail.com by 27 April 2020. Include your name and institutional affiliation, if applicable. Please specify in the proposal if you have technical requirements beyond audio-visual playback. Submissions will be anonymised when reviewed. Accepted participants will be notified by 11 May 2020.

https://radioandthesoundofmodernism.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Narrating Musicology: Reviewing the History/Histories of Musicology

Institute of Musicology, University of Bern, October 1st – 4th 2020

In November 1996, a musicological colloquium was held at University of Bern under the title Musikwissenschaft – eine verspätete Disziplin? (‘Musicology – a Delayed Discipline?’). The discussions and outcomes that took place were then published four years later in an anthology of the same title, edited by Anselm Gerhard. The aim of both the conference and the publication was to focus less on specific key people or institutions, and instead foreground general tendencies within the history of musicology: from its beginning in the late 19th century until the time of publication and with a scope also beyond the German-speaking world. Even if relatively late, this approach proved essential for considering the history of the musicological discipline as an object of study in itself.
More than twenty years later, and in light of the upcoming 100 years’ anniversary of the Institute of Musicology, Bern, which will take place in 2021, we now take the opportunity to once again reflect on these issues:
– What is the current state of the history of musicology as a discipline?
– How has the reflection on musicology changed current research as well as teaching contents?
– Can musicology still be understood as a “delayed discipline”?
Traditionally, musicology has been divided into three strands: historical musicology, systematic musicology and ethnomusicology. Additionally, related subjects – such as music theory and music pedagogy – have had an important impact on current research on the history of the discipline. The result of this, however, is that multiple and at times even isolated histories of musicology have developed. This conference focuses on these various narratives and aims at encouraging an inter- as well as intra-disciplinary dialogue.
The Bernese colloquium twenty years ago focused on the field of tension in musicology “between belief in progress and rejection of modernity”. The discrepancy between international orientation and national chauvinist tendencies, which were both present in the 1990s, were also addressed. The present conference asks, however, is this still the case today? It further queries whether the disclosure of the various narratives, as well as the culturally specific contradictions within the various sub-disciplines have changed the self-perception of musicology as a whole. How important are national factors in shaping the principal focus of the discipline’s history nowadays? This conference focuses on the various narratives that have evolved within our field and questions the motivations which have led to these various regional histories. Therefore, the focus shall be extended beyond Western academic perspectives to a more global, and thus multifaceted approach.
Another important aspect of this conference is the question of why we should study the history of our discipline at all.
– What kind of interaction is at play when on the one hand we focus on disciplinary self-reflection and on the other, on our objects of study?
– What are the objects of study of the history of academic disciplines?
–  On the topic of musicology’s protagonists: who is responsible for narrating the histories of musicology?
–  Is the historiography of disciplines an area of study where methodological and content-related interpretation can be applied?
– How much power do various institutions have in shaping and constructing the narratives surrounding musicology?
–  What roles do these narratives play in shaping the identities of scientists, institutions and various schools of thought?
– How can musicologists deal with the history of musicology in the digital age?
The conference aims to provide a platform where discussions can happen across different generations and between the various sub-disciplines of musicology, music theory and music pedagogy.
The conference’s core-topics are:
– Reflections on the various histories within musicology (regional, national and international, as well as inter- and intra-disciplinary practice)
– The interaction between musicology’s self-reflexion and our objects of study (protagonists, methods, institutions, the digital age)
We invite you to send your proposals (max. 300 words) for one of the following categories: individual papers (20 minutes plus 10 minutes of discussion);  Panels (3 related papers of 1.5 hours in total); Poster presentations;  Roundtables (4 shorter presentations of 15 minutes each plus a chaired discussion; 2 hours in total); Presentation of films, audio or other media.
Please submit your abstracts to narratingmusicology@musik.unibe.ch by the 16th of February 2020. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously and should therefore not contain the names of the authors. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of March 2020.
Further information:
www.narratingmusicology.home.blog

Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology. EAA 2020.

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

Rupert Till (and Raquel Jiménez and Margarita Díaz-Andreu)

Prof. Rupert Till PhD FHEA CMgr MCMI
Professor of Music
Associate Dean for International
School of Music, Humanities and Media
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield | Queensgate | Huddersfield | HD1 3DH
http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=smusrt
http://rupertchill.wordpress.com

Music and Change Before and After 1990

Baltic Musicological Conference 2020

MUSIC AND CHANGE BEFORE AND AFTER 1990

Vilnius, 10–12 September 2020

CALL for papers to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020

  • Organized by the Department of Music History at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, the Lithuanian-Polish research project “Music of Change: Expression of Liberation in Polish and Lithuanian Music Before and After 1989” and the Musicological Section of the Lithuanian Composers’ Union

The employment of music as a form of cultural opposition and transformative power is a multifunctional process that implies an extension of the thematic and disciplinary borders to the complex relations of the music’s cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts. However, such approach requires to provide a space for deep engagements in music and its various worlds overcoming a simplified understanding of musical practices as a reflection of social structures and political processes. As Jacques Attali writes on the relationship between music and societal structures, music “makes audible the new world that will gradually become visible, that will impose itself and regulate the order of things; it is not only the image of things, but the transcending of the everyday, the herald of the future” (Attali 1985).

Baltic Singing Revolution – “revolution by singing and smiling” (Heinz Valk 1988) – is a widely known example of the public expressive cultural practice which had a stimulating effect on cultural imagination and political change. Remembering the year 1990, so important but not limited to national histories of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, the Baltic musicological conference 2020 aims to acquire new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the ways in which the musical expression of liberation and musicians’ networks contributed to political and cultural change before and after the end of the Cold War. In what ways the musical practices contributed to formation, negotiation and transformation of sociocultural identities and changing collectivities? What has been the relationship between the processes of cultural and political change before and after 1990? What were prominent ideas, landmark cultural texts and influential individuals who have had a formative and transformative power in these processes? To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the 20th–21st-century music and change in the widest sense, we invite the proposals for the Baltic musicological conference 2020, to be held at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre in Vilnius 10–12 September 2020. The conference will include international guest speakers Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Gintautas Mažeikis (Vytautas Magnus University) and Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University).

Academic committee

Małgorzata Janicka-Słysz (Academy of Music in Kraków), Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli (Lithuanian Composers’ Union), Rima Povilionienė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre), Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University), Iwona Sowińska-Fruhtrunk (Academy of Music in Kraków), Rūta Stanevičiūtė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre)

Local organizing committee

Zita Abramavičiūtė, Ingrida Jasonienė, Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli, Rima Povilionienė (vice-chair), Rima Rimšaitė, Rūta Stanevičiūtė (chair), Judita Žukienė

Submission

The conference language is English. There will be two options: individual papers and panels (of 3 or 4 presenters).

  • Papers: We invite abstracts of no longer than 300 words, including keywords and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.
  • Panels: The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (300 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. 

Please submit proposals as a doc/odt/rtf attachment to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020. The following format should be used:

  • Name, affiliation and contact email address
  • Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper)
  • Title of presentation
  • Abstract (300 words maximum; in the case of panels, include a general abstract followed by individual abstracts, in total 1200 words maximum)
  • Keywords (5 maximum)
  • References (optional, 10 maximum)
  • CV (100 words maximum; in case of panels, CVs of all participants)

Accepted speakers will be informed by mid-April 2020.

The conference registration fee both for Oral Presenters and Non-Presenters/Listeners – 30 EUR, student registration fee – 15 EUR, onsite payment.

The fee includes attendance to the conference sessions, conference material, coffee breaks and conference reception, social program events.

Information about registration and accommodation will be sent after acceptance of proposals.

The selected papers will be invited for publication in the international peer-reviewed scientific journal “Lithuanian Musicology” (indexed in SCOPUS, EBSCO, RILM).

The conference organizers look forward to receiving your submissions!

More info:

Prof. Dr. Rima Povilionienė

balticconference2020@lmta.lt

Religion and Magnificence – Music and Ceremonies at the European Courts in 17th and 18th Centuries

Call for Papers

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Religion and magnificence – music and ceremonies at the European courts in 17th and 18th centuries.

Queluz National Palace (Lisbon, Portugal)

July 3rd – 5th, 2020

Organization:

Divino Sospiro – Centro de Estudos Musicais Setecentistas de Portugal 

Scientific Committee:

Cristina Fernandes, Francesco Cotticelli, Giuseppina Raggi, José Camões,

Iskrena Yordanova, Paologiovanni Maione, Ricardo Bernardes 

DS-CEMSP 8th International Conference is going to be held from July 3rd through July 5th, 2020 at the National Palace of Queluz (Portugal). This year the event is dedicated to the phenomenon of religious ceremonies at the European courts and palaces during the ancient régime. These demonstrations of magnificence had the function to represent the royal power through the image of piety, moral stance, divine favour and order, and often included musical and theatrical forms of presentation. The conference aims to promote a multidisciplinary dialogue on topics which explore different aspects of religious manifestations at court and the uses of music in the theatralization of royal ceremonies and rituals, calling for the participation of researchers of various areas of studies. Topics as following will be considered:

  • The Royal Chapels and their activity
  • Religious music and representation of the royal power
  • Repertoires, performance practice, dissemination and adaptation of genres across Europe
  • Ceremonial, liturgy and music
  • Oratorios at European courts and noble palaces
  • The court and the city: religious festivals and processions 

Scholars are invited to submit individual proposals with the maximum length of 20 minutes per paper. Session proposals will be accepted as well: a maximum of three or four papers will be taken into consideration, and the session should not exceed 1h30. 

A selection of the presented papers will be published in our book series Cadernos de Queluz.

Official languages of the conference are Portuguese, English, Italian and Spanish.
Abstracts in Word format (.doc), should not exceed 300 words.

Please enclose in the same file brief curriculum vitae of 150 words max., providing your name and surname, postal address, e-mail and telephone number, as well as your institutional affiliation.

Deadline for sending abstracts is March 15th, 2020

E-mail: cemsp@sapo.pt

Web: https://www.divinosospiro.org/cemsp.html

The scientific board will examine all abstracts by March 29th, 2020 and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter.

Tzlil Meudcan 2020

The Musicology Department at the Hebrew University and Tzlil Meudcan Festival invite graduate and postgraduate students in musicology to submit applications for the Tzlil Meudcan musicological roundtables, Tel Aviv, July 4-9, 2020. Roundtables will be held in parallel with festival program whose thematic focus this year is “Patterns”.

The musicological sessions will feature a public symposium (July 4) followed by daily roundtables on the festival’s program and assigned reading on various related topics (July 6-9). Discussions will be led by Prof. Martin Iddon (University of Leeds) and Dr. Assaf Shelleg (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem). Successful candidates will enjoy a free pass to the entire festival program in addition to reduced accommodation costs at the Gilgal hotel in Tel Aviv, where all festivals guests will be accommodated allowing a mutual vibrant environment right off the beautiful coast line of Tel Aviv.

Applicants should submit a statement outlining their research interests (250 words) in addition to a biographical sketch. Please submit your application at tzlilmeudcan@outlook.com

Submission deadline: January 30, 2020.

Low End Theories: Understanding Bass Music and Culture Study Day

It’s my great pleasure to formally open the Call for Participation for Low End Theories: Understanding Bass Music and Culture.

This will be a joint BFE/RMA Study Day at the University of Bristol next year, on Saturday 16 May 2020.

Keynote speaker: DJ Krust aka Kirk Thompson

Visit the website to read the CfP and join the mailing list for future updates: http://lowendtheories2020.wordpress.com/

The deadline for submissions is Friday 31 January 2020.

With a steadily increasing array of academic publications in the field reflecting bass music’s global popularity and value, we believe the organisation of an interdisciplinary conference on this topic in the lively city of Bristol is both timely and relevant to a broad audience.

Enquiries: lowendtheories2020@gmail.com

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/517207328794359/

Twitter: #LowEnd2020