North-South Interchanges: Collaborations, Tensions, Hybridizations

Organized by

UNESP (State University of São Paulo) – Instituto de Artes, São Paulo (Brazil)

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca (Italy)

Universidad de la República, Montevideo/Salto (Uruguay)

Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES) – Centro de Artes, Vitória (Brazil)

UNESP, Instituto de Artes, São Paulo – Brazil

19-21 September 2018

 

The relations between the music made in South America, and that made in Europe, and in North America has been characterized at times by efforts to approach, some others times by rejection, many times resulting in peculiar hybrids. These same relations reflect in music criticism and in aesthetics, sometimes reinforcing the similarities, sometimes invoking the differences, or even having to deal with musical phenomena for which no specific vocabulary has been invented yet. We part from the argument proposed by Joseph Kerman, «repertories are determined by performers, and canons by critics» (‘A Few Canonic Variations’, in: Critical Inquiry, x/1, Canons [Sep. 1983], pp. 107-125), evoking the strength of the discursive network that develops around musical creation, performance, and its aesthetics. This conference intends to explore the rich and multifarious relations between music-making — understood in a very broad sense — and music criticism and aesthetics that, in some way, deal with or reflect the North-South relations.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The reception of European and North-American music in South America;
  • The reception of South-American music in Europe and in North America;
  • Nationalisms and the adaptation / rejection of foreign models in Music Criticism;
  • The North-South relations in Popular Music Criticism;
  • The North-South relations in Art Music Criticism;
  • Aesthetics, Philosophy of Music and Music Criticism;
  • Nationalisms and aesthetics: discourse between borders;
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy of Music in South America;
  • History of Music Criticism.

Scholarly Committee:

  • Marita Fornaro Bordolli (Universidad de la Respública, Uruguay)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Italy)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Italy)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Italy)
  • Lia Tomás (UNESP – Instituto de Artes, Brazil)
  • Mónica Vermes (Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo – Centro de Artes, Brazil)

The official languages of the conference are English, Spanish and Portuguese. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and no more than 200 words of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 5 May 2018*** to <conferencecriticism2018@ia.unesp.br>. With your proposal, please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail, and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation. The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2018, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel, and accommodation will be announced after that date. For any additional information, please contact:

<conferencecriticism2018@ia.unesp.br>

 

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Rethinking Sound 2018

CFP deadline: 31 December 2017
Notification of results: 15 January 2018
Conference dates: 30–31 March 2018
Conference website: http://mrc.hanyang.ac.kr/rethinking-sound
Venue: Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea

Keynote Speakers:

Music Research Center at Hanyang University is pleased to announce an international conference “Rethinking Sound 2018,” to be held on 30–31 March 2018 in Seoul, Korea.

Sound has long been the subject of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, but it has gained more popularity in recent decades; the sheer number of scholarly publications in what one may call “sound studies” testifies to this statement. As the ways in which sound is produced and consumed are continuing to change, we suspect that sound will be of central concern to many of us. What soundscapes are around us, and how do we react to soundscape? Is there any evidence suggesting that the way of thinking about the world is shifting away from “ocularcentric” to “aural-centric”? What are the implications of such a shift? How does (re)thinking about sound help us (re)define human subjectivity?

In attempting to answer these questions, we invite proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) on any topics related to the conference theme “Rethinking Sound,” broadly defined. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Historical/cultural/geographical soundscapes
  • History of listening
  • Human-computer interaction (HCI) with sound
  • Mediated sound/listening
  • Sound and disability studies
  • Sound and ethics
  • Sound and film
  • Sound and gender
  • Sound and noise within/outside musical works
  • Sound and subjectivity/identity
  • Sound and the body
  • Sound in video games
  • Sound, space, and mobility

We welcome proposals from scholars and practitioners as well as early-career researchers and graduate students working in all musicological disciplines.

Submissions, in English, should comprise a paper title, an abstract of up to 250 words, and a short biography of about 150 words. Please email submissions in PDF or Word format to rethinking.sound@gmail.com by 31 December 2017.

Rethinking Sound 2018 is supported by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea.

Centennial Reflections on Women’s Suffrage and the Arts

CENTENNIAL REFLECTIONS ON WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE AND THE ARTS

Local : National : Transnational

An international, multi-disciplinary public conference

University of Surrey, UK, 29–30 June 2018

Keynote Speakers:

  • Irene Cockroft, author of Women in the Arts & Crafts and Suffrage Movements at the Dawn of the 20th Century
  • Elizabeth Crawford, author of The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain and Ireland

CFP: deadline for submissions 26 January 2018

Conference website: www.suffragecentennial.wordpress.com

The 2018 centenary of the Representation of the People Act (6 February 1918), which granted the vote to many women in the UK, yields an ideal opportunity for sustained critical reflection on women’s suffrage. This conference seeks to explore the artistic activities nurtured within the movement, their range and legacy, as well as the relationships between politics and art. In striving for an inclusive, transnational reach, it will at the same time seek to move beyond traditional emphases on white middle-class feminism and explore the intersections between the regional, national, and global contexts for women’s suffrage with specific respect to the arts.

While proposals addressing any aspects of women’s suffrage will be welcomed, this conference will focus upon three strands:

  1. Women’s suffrage in/and the arts
  2. Women’s suffrage in Surrey and the surrounds
  3. Transnational networks and flows of texts in relation to women’s suffrage

20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of these strands, including but not limited to:

  • Late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century women’s writing on suffrage;
  • Political reflections on the arts and the cultural sphere, e.g. in music;
  • Transnational networks and mobilities of political texts and ideas, incorporating suffrage movements in other countries;
  • Politically active individuals with strong links to Surrey (particularly in relation to the arts) e.g. Mary Watts, Dame Ethel Smyth, Gertrude Jekyll, Marion Wallace Dunlop;
  • Networks such as Ferguson’s Gang, Surrey Hills Group, Surrey Pilgrimage Group, and women who organised suffrage marches;
  • Sociological theories of women’s suffrage;
  • Contributions of women of colour to suffrage movements in Britain and globally;
  • Art (both historical and contemporary) inspired by women’s suffrage.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for one-hour roundtables of 3–5 participants. We encourage proposals from postgraduate students and independent scholars in addition to institutionally-affiliated established academics.

Planned activities include a panel discussion featuring artists who have been active in performing and creating works based on women’s suffrage and some of its key figures; a recital of the music of Dame Ethel Smyth; and a visit to the nearby Watts Gallery. We envisage that an edited publication will be developed from papers presented at the conference.

Abstracts of not more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 26 January 2018 to suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk. Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 23 February 2018. A limited number of student bursaries may be offered to offset costs of attendance.

Conference Committee: Christopher Wiley, Charlotte Mathieson, Lucy Ella Rose (co-chairs)

Enquiries: suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk

Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research

‘BEYOND “MESEARCH”: AUTOETHNOGRAPHY, SELF-REFLEXIVITY, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AS ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN MUSIC STUDIES’

Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16 April 2018, Senate House, London

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

Surrealism and music in France

Surrealism and music in France, 1924-1952: interdisciplinary and international contexts

Senate House, University of London, Friday 8 June 2018

Paris was the principal centre of surrealist activity and the focus of connections between surrealist literature, ethnology, sociology, visual arts and music. The links between surrealism and the emerging disciplines of ethnology and ethnomusicology redefined the concept of exoticism in France and were the subject of a good deal of polemical debate. However, connections between surrealism and music have been little explored, although it is clear the movement had a decisive influence on major French composers such as Pierre Boulez, Olivier Messiaen and André Jolivet. This study day initiates a transdisciplinary and international dialogue and will situate music at the heart of these debates. The day will end with a linked piano recital by the outstanding young pianist Alexander Soares.

We welcome paper proposals – in English or French – from music, literary and other scholars on relevant topics including:

  • In what senses can music be ‘surrealist’?
  • The emergence of ethnology and ethnomusicology in Paris and its relevance to artists, specifically composers
  • The Paris Exposition Coloniale Internationale (1931), the foundation of the Musée de l’Homme and their impact on the artistic/musical scene
  • The Central/South American connection to Parisian surrealist arts and music
  • Text settings of surrealist poets
  • The international dimension of surrealism and its impact on French musicians

Confirmed speakers include Sébastien Arfouilloux (Université de Grenoble-Alpes).

Proposals (300 words), in English or French, for 30-minute papers and a short biography (100 words) should be emailed to Dr Caroline Potter: Caroline.Potter [at] sas.ac.uk by 31 January 2018.  Enquiries may also be sent to this address.

Music and Figurative Arts in the Nineteenth Century

lezione di musicaorganized by
Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini (Lucca)

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto
16-18 November 2018

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music and Figurative Arts in the Nineteenth Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from Friday 16 until Sunday 18 November 2018.
In 1795 Friedrich Schiller wrote: «In its most elevated perfection, the plastic art ought to become music and move us by the immediate action exercised on the mind by the senses» (Schiller, Letters on the Aesthetical Educaiton of Men, Letter N. XXII, 1795). This sentence underlines the fundamental aesthetic change that coincided with the onset of the nineteenth century. According to ut musica pictura, music becomes the model for an art able to express and communicate feelings. As music no longer has to embody  order, so painting moves away from pure imitation to encompass emotional effect. Music and painting converge in embodying a sensual conception of the arts: music is capable of expressing emotions and arousing them in the audience; painting can do the same through visual perception. The present conference aims to explore this multifaceted relationship between music and figurative arts in the nineteenth century. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The Relationship Between Composers and Artists, Painters and Sculptors;
  • The Concurrence of Musical and Artistic Aesthetics in the Nineteenth Century;
  • Tradition and Restoration in the Course Of The Century;
  • Virtuosity and Interpretation;
  • Nationalism and Universality;
  • Absolute Music;
  • The Pictorial Basis of the Symphonic Poem;
  • Music Pictorialism in Paintings;
  • Opera and Paintings;
  • Scenography and Theatrical Art;
  • Wagner and the Visual Arts;
  • Realism and the Turn of the Twentieth Century;
  • Colour, Music and Symbolist Movements;
  • Published Title Pages as an Artistic Phenomenon;
  • Exoticism and Folklorism.

Programme Committee:
Jordi Ballester Gibert (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)
Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
Peter L. Schmunk (Wofford College, Spartanburg, SC)

Keynote Speaker:
Peter L. Schmunk (Wofford College, Spartanburg, SC)
Jordi Ballester Gibert (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.  Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography. All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 06 May 2018*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation. The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2018, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact: Dr. Massimiliano Sala conferences@luigiboccherini.org www.luigiboccherini.org  

London Stage and the 19th-Century World II

Call for Papers 

London Stage and the Nineteenth-Century World II

5-7 April 2018, New College, Oxford

Following the success of the 2016 London Stage conference, we welcome contributions on all aspects and forms of drama and theatrical practice in 19th-century London, from plays and operas to pantomime and puppetry.

More details can be found here: http://www.new.ox.ac.uk/london-stage-and-nineteenth-century-world-ii-2018

Michael Burden (New College, Oxford)

Jonathan Hicks (Newcastle University)

Mapping the Musical City

Mapping the Musical City – a historically savvy symposium

Friday 2 February 2018, Institute of Musical Research, Senate House, London

Proposals due: Wednesday 13 December 2017, 1200 GMT

Keynote speaker: Samuel Llano (University of Manchester)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

This symposium, in association with the School of Advanced Studies, addresses mapping as both an object and method of musicological enquiry. Inspired in part by the “spatial turn” in the humanities at large and fuelled by the increasing accessibility of Geographic Information Systems software, musicologists can now visualize and analyse complicated trends across time and place with greater ease than ever before. Yet, the ideological and epistemological implications of different mapping tools and techniques remain underexplored. The aim of this symposium is to situate recent projects within a longer history of cartographic practice in music studies.

 

By taking a historical perspective on the mapping of musical cities this symposium will raise questions on two fronts. Firstly, it will acknowledge cartography as a factor in past musical practice, asking, for instance: how the active “zoning” of civic space regulated performers’ livelihoods; how tour guides and travel writing predetermined listening experiences; and how the policing of bodily display and alcoholic consumption have made entertainment venues a focus for surveillance and control. The second set of questions relates to the mapping techniques available to music studies today: we will ask what is at stake in converting affective, interpersonal musical experiences into machine-readable spatial coordinates; how the problems of mapping the performing arts differ from those of mapping literary or visual culture; and how the current fascination with urban centres emerged from earlier work at the scale of the region or nation.

 

Please send proposals (300 words) for individual papers or panels to Jonathan Hicks (Newcastle University) at jonathan.hicks@newcastle.ac.uk. If you have an alternative format suggestion (including, say, demonstrations of current projects or discussions of cartographic texts) feel free to get in touch to discuss your ideas.

 

Proposals from early career scholars are particularly encouraged. Thanks to sponsorship from Nick Baker there is a modest fund to support travel to the event, particularly for anyone attending from overseas; if you are interested in this support, please say so in your application.

 

Finally, please note the quick turnaround for this call: the deadline for proposals is Wednesday 13 December 2017, 1200 GMT and decisions will be made later that week.

Ralph Vaughan Williams and the Church: an RMA Study Day

 

4th June 2018, Durham University

Conference Website

The organising committee for Ralph Vaughan Williams and the Church and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies invite proposals for this RMA Study Day to be held at Durham University on the 4 June 2018.

We invite researchers to submit proposals engaging with perspectives on the relationship between Ralph Vaughan Williams and the church. PhD students are especially welcome to submit presentations. Proposals may address, but need not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Vaughan Williams and hymnody
  • Vaughan Williams and science, especially evolutionary thought
  • Vaughan Williams, revealed and natural theologies
  • Vaughan Williams and the liturgy
  • Analytical approaches to Vaughan William’s church music
  • Vaughan William’s church music and the long nineteenth century
  • Vaughan Williams, sacralisation of the secular
  • Vaughan Williams, legacies today

 

Individual Proposal: Abstracts for a single speaker (20 minutes + 10 discussion) should be 350 words and clearly describe the argument, evidence, and research findings, situate the work in relation to previous scholarship, and articulate how the research contributes to research into Victorian interdisciplinarity

Panel Proposal: Abstracts for 3 speakers (1 ½ hours) or 4 speakers (2 hours) should be 350 words and provide an outline of the main argument, evidence, and research findings of the panel, as well as situating the panel’s work in relation to previous scholarship and articulating how the research contributes to research into Victorian interdisciplinary. The panel organiser should also include an individual proposal abstract for each paper following the guidelines for Individual Proposals, along with each panelist’s contact information. Panel Proposals will be considered only as a whole, the session’s coherence being an essential part of the evaluation process.

Submission information: Please send your proposals as Word documents to cncs@durham.ac.uk no later than 26 January 2018. The following format should be used:

  • Name, affiliation (if applicable) and contact details (postal address, email and phone)
  • Type of presentation (individual or panel)
  • Abstract title
  • Audio-visual and other requirements (the following are available: Data projector or large plasma screen; Desktop PC; VGA, HDMI and 3.5mm audio inputs; CD player; DVD player; Visualiser; Piano)
  • Brief biography (150 words)

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era. International Conference celebrating 475 Years of the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona

immagine della Santissima Vergine Maria di Loreto della Giara in Verona, Stamperia del Seminario, Padova 1714 Domenico Zanatta Venezia 1665 Verona 5 agosto 1748

Verona, 1-3 June 2018

Call for Papers 
Deadline for proposals: 31 December 2017

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era is an international conference organized by the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona on the occasion of the 475th anniversary of its foundation (23 May 1543), in collaboration with University of Verona, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, University of St Andrews and Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona.
Natural sequel to The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, 24-27 May 2017 – vmo.unive.it/soundscape2017), this further initiative has the aim of increasing debate on the varied soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the early modern period. This territory, which stretched from Bergamo in the west to the Friulian Alps in the north-east and the river Po at the Republic’s southern extremity, formed one of the three subdivisions of the Serenissima; the others were the Dogado (Venice and surrounding area) and the Stato da mar (Venetian possessions in the eastern Adriatic and Mediterranean areas). The articulate system that regulates musical and non-musical sound in the Venetian territories prior to the fall of the Serenissima in 1797 is highly conducive to an interdisciplinary approach which draws on the new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology. Emblematic, in this sense, are the activities of the Accademia Filarmonica, which have dominated almost five centuries of local musical history.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

The conference will take place in Verona from 1-3 June 2018.

Suggested topics: 
– Sound and urban identity
– The sound of local civic ceremonial and devotional activities
– Reciprocal influence of Venetian and Terraferma soundscapes
– Musical relationships between the Terraferma cities and the courts of northern Italy and elsewhere
– Music and society (patronage; academies and other musical institutions, private and public; private uses of music)
– Educational, philosophical and social dynamics in musical practice
– The sounds of public and private festivities
– Musical theatre in the Terraferma and its social impact
– Music, urban architecture and the visual arts
– Music and economics (music printing, production and commerce of musical instruments, the economics of performance)
– Sound as material and non-material cultural heritage

One session of the conference will be entirely dedicated to research on the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona.

Peer-reviewed contributions will be published in a dedicated volume, scheduled to appear in 2019.

*** 

The programme committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, with 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Please email abstracts (max. 250 words), together with a short biography, to: biblioteca@academiafilarmonica.191.it

Further information will be available from September 2017 on the conference website, which will continue to be updated with details of costs, events and accommodation near the conference venue.

Accepted proposals will be announced before 16 February 2018.

*** 

Organizing Committee: 
Alessandro Arcangeli (University of Verona)
Vincenzo Borghetti (University of Verona)
David Douglas Bryant (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)
Luigi Collarile (University of Geneva)
Michele Magnabosco (Accademia Filarmonica, Verona)
Laura Moretti (University of St Andrews)
Laura Och (Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona)

For further information please contact
Michele Magnabosco: biblioteca@accademiafilarmonica.191.it

http://www.accademiafilarmonica.org/filarmonica/en/convegno-internazionale-2018/