Between Centres and Peripheries

Music in Europe from the French Revolution until WWI (1789-1914)

———

International Virtual Conference

06-08 May 2021

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca, the Research Group ERASMUSH of the University of Oviedo (Spain) and the Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française of Veniceare pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Between Centres and Peripheries: Music in Europe from the French Revolution until WWI (1789-1914)», to be held from Thursday 06 until Saturday 08 May 2021.

In the nineteenth century, music occupied a prominent position in bourgeois European society, and cities such as Paris, Vienna, Leipzig, Milan, and London became social and cultural references for the rest of the continent, inhabitants of which worked to imitate the cities’ concerts, theatrical life, their soirées and parties, its music promenades, etc.

This conference examines, from a micro-historical perspective, the tensions and dialogues developed in European musical life throughout this time period. Here we apply the concepts of centres and peripheries not to geography but also to methodology. We will analyze the reproduction of cultural models but also the tensions that these models produced in the peripheries, most of which have been ignored in the historiography of Western European music.

Periphery also refers to the emergence of musical genres that have remained relatively non-canonic, including popular repertoires from the music hall to the variétés, street bands or the music of cabarets. Furthermore, we will also examine the birth of musico-national languages situated on the European geographical margins.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas,although other topics are also welcome:

  • Music from the peripheries: alternative genres and repertoires
  • The diffusion and circulation of music in new and different contexts
  • The reception and adaptations of the canon on the margins of Europe
  • Redefining centres and peripheries in European music
  • Cultural transfer of music, both geographically and socially
  • The commercialization of music
  • Models of music production in the peripheries: concert cycles, musical societies, festivals, etc.
  • Music national languages inside or outside the canon?
  • Universality vs. Nationality
  • Amateurism in the time of the virtuoso performers
  • Music for new spaces: promenades, cafés, cabarets, gardens, etc.

Programme Committee:

  • Maria Encina Cortizo Rodriguez (Universidad de Oviedo)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Ramón Sobrino (Universidad de Oviedo)
  • José Ignacio Suárez (Universidad de Oviedo)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane)
  • Yvan Nommick (Université de Montpellier)

The official languages of the conference are English, French, Spanish and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biographical information.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than Sunday ***28 February 2021*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of ***March 2021***, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme and registration will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Music, Cinema, and Modernism. The Works and Heritage of Kurt Weill between Europe and America

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and the DAMS/Università di Torino are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music, Cinema, and Modernism. The Works and Heritage of Kurt Weill between Europe and America», to be held at the  Università degli studi di Torino, Palazzo Nuovo, Via Sant’Ottavio, 20 – Torino, from 21 to 22 May 2021.

Keynote Speakers

  • Nils Grosch (Universität Salzburg)
  • Stephen Hinton (Stanford University)

The conference aims to address aspects of Kurt Weill’s works in relation to his contemporaries and his heritage to succeeding generations, both in the United States and in Europe. The creative activities of the German-American composer have been characterized by his keen interest in new media: principally, in radio in Germany and in the cinema in the United States, and in new forms of experimentation in musical theater on both sides of the Atlantic.

The fact that his compositions as well as his sensibilities tended to situate themselves somewhere between the poles of highbrow and the lowbrow culture allows for multiple interpretations, while prompting various possible themes for research. The themes suggested here are not intended to be restrictive but, rather, to invite a wide range of reflections, and other topics are also welcome:

  • The modernity of Kurt Weill: borrowings and assimilations among his contemporaries
  • After 1950: the theoretical and aesthetic legacy of Kurt Weill after his death
  • Kurt Weill’s german-american contemporaries: aesthetic, artistic, and compositional choices
  • Marc Blitzstein as a translator and interpreter of the German Weill in the United States
  • Love Life on Broadway: a new musical theater genre is born?
  • Musicals, American opera, Radio Opera and so on: the ideas about musical theater by Kurt Weill
  • The debates for and against modernism among German émigré composers to the United States  before and after World War II
  • Aesthetic and theoretical debates concerning film music between the 1920s and 1940s
  • Film music as “modern music”: identity and perspectives
  • Kurt Weill and Hollywood: New Music for the Cinema?
  • Composer and arranger: new roles and new relationships
  • Berlin, Broadway, and Hollywood: a comparison of their modes of organization and cultural production

Programme Committee

  • Giaime Alonge (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Giulia Carluccio (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Tim Carter (University of North Carolina)
  • Pietro Cavallotti (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca)
  • Kim Kowalke (Eastman School of Music/ University of Rochester – The Kurt Weill Foundation for Music)
  • Andrea Malvano (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Ilario Meandri (università degli studi di Torino)
  • Marida Rizzuti (Università IULM, Milano)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 29 November 2020*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by ***Sunday 13 December 2020***, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Symposium Tanz als Musik – Zwischen Klang und Bewegung, a Symposium of the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis

Basel, Musik-Akademie, 19.– 21.11.2020   (postponed to 23.–25. September 2021)

https://www.fhnw.ch/de/forschung-und-dienstleistungen/musik/schola-cantorum-basiliensis/symposien-und-studientage/symposium-tanz-als-musik

https://www.forschung.schola-cantorum-basiliensis.ch/de/veranstaltungen.html?detail=17eddf7d-8c33-42cb-8e77-79df6f54e86f

Congress on Sound, Music and Musical Instruments

DATE: 2-3-4 of October 2020
INFORMATION: https://congressorganimusic.wixsite.com/co2020oc

THEME: The general theme chosen for this year is: “SOUND GENERATION: environment and music in generations of sound creation”, with all papers related to organological and sound matters being highly welcome. 
WHERE: Castelo Branco – central Portugal
LIMIT DATE FOR PROPOSALS: 15 September

Dear all,
we are pleased to be able to organise the ANIMUSIC Congress in 2020, in spite of the known issues we all have been facing during this year.
In the region chosen to hold our congress, there has hardly been any case of covid-19. Besides many good reasons, of which having a low population density is one of them, the air is not polluted, there is no traffic nor confusion on the streets, life quality is known to be very high. There are mountains, forests, ecological farms, self-sustainable agricultural systems (like ours in the headquarters of ANIMUSIC: Quinta da Lira), pure crystalline water fountains and rivers, with beautiful river-pools or beaches and lakes where we all go swim (water we can drink !). Besides these natural healthy conditions, in Portugal people respect the general governmental health policies, wearing masks in public closed places, keeping distance, different “in” and “out” paths, and limiting the number of people in social gatherings. Here, in Castelo Branco, the hospital created a detached alley for treating contaminated patients, fearing a full epidemic everywhere, which did not happen – in fact, the very few isolated cases  from visitors to the region were immediately taken care of, and either submitted to home-isolation or transported to specialised institutions. Cases of death “with” virus (not “from” the virus) were minimal: the serious problematic cases were from other diseases.
We are sorry to have heard of worrying publicity regarding Portugal – which led to the creation of travel limitations or quarantine obligations which were not realistic. These last bans, and the earlier general European cancellation of public events, provoked serious limitations to the organization of concerts, conferences or other initiatives, and we all know the damage it caused to the artistic world (and many other worlds), and consequently to musical instruments technicians and all related professionals. We try to go forward with positivism.
We are preparing our event with all precautions: part of the presentations or concerts will be in a large hall, with people respecting the imposed law regulations (sitting distance, masks, provision of disinfectant liquids, special hygienisation of the spaces, etc.), and part of the presentations, weather allowing, will be in open gardens.
We have sent to private contacts a first Call for Papers, to have an idea of the response of potential participants. We are happy to have had a number of proposals which allow us to set up the conference with a good core of participants.
We have thus decided to make a full public Call for Papers, waiting for a while before doing it, having been observing the evolution of the ‘epidemic’ and the various governmental decisions, and so proposing the deadline to the 15th of September. If you are interested in physically participating, please send your proposal asap, so we have a full notion of the program possibilities (we try to have various recitals, in different spaces, to allow visitors to enjoy the different marvels of each place – palaces, parks, castles, etc.). We are also planning a complimentary tour in the region, with a visit to a special historical organ in a village with difficult access. And, as usual, a wonderful delicious banquet.
Please read more about the Call for Papers, transportation, and other information, at the website created for this Congress: link.


Welcome to ANIMUSIC-Portugal.
With warm good wishes,

Patricia Bastos

ANIMUSIC team


Historical Fictions Research Network 2021

Online conference (Zoom)

18th-21st February 2021

Theme:  Remembering Catastrophe

Historical fictions can be understood as an expanded mode of historiography. Scholars in literary, visual, historical and museum/re-creation studies have long been interested in the construction of the fictive past, understanding it as a locus for ideological expression. However, this is a key moment for the study of historical fictions as critical recognition of these texts and their convergence with lines of theory is expanding into new areas such as the philosophy of history, narratology, popular literature, historical narratives of national and cultural identity, and cross-disciplinary approaches to narrative constructions of the past.

Historical fictions measure the gap between the pasts we are permitted to know and those we wish to know: the interaction of the meaning-making narrative drive with the narrative-resistant nature of the past. They constitute a powerful discursive system for the production of cognitive and ideological representations of identity, agency, and social function, and for the negotiation of conceptual relationships and charged tensions between the complexity of societies in time and the teleology of lived experience. The licences of fiction, especially in mass culture, define a space of thought in which the pursuit of narrative forms of meaning is permitted to slip the chains of sanctioned historical truths to explore the deep desires and dreams that lie beneath all constructions of the past.

We welcome paper proposals from Archaeology, Architecture, Literature, Media, Art History, Cartography, Geography, History, Musicology, Reception Studies, Linguistics, Museum Studies, Media Studies, Politics, Re-enactment, Larping, Gaming, Transformative Works, Gender, Race, Queer studies and others.

We welcome paper proposals across historical periods, with ambitious, high-quality, inter-disciplinary approaches and new methodologies that will support research into larger trends and which will lead to more theoretically informed understandings of the mode across historical periods, cultures and languages.

Theme: Remembering Catastrophe

2020 is a year we are likely to remember. This conference will consider how we have remembered / memorialised / narrated / represented catastrophes including war, famine, epidemic, genocide, tsunami and avalanches, natural and human made disaster; how ‘ownership’ of disasters has been claimed, how disasters have been written out or elided and how disasters have structured ethnic, national, religious, cultural, community, personal identities.

Please submit papers to the Paper Proposal Form.  https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/hfrn-conference-2021-online/

Deadline 30th September

Contact: historicalfictionsresearch@gmail.com

Twitter: @HistoricalFic

Facebook Group: Historical Fictions Research Network

Interrogating sources: Prokofiev, words and music

https://crulh.univ-lorraine.fr/content/crulh-appel-communication

Call for papers
  • CFP deadline: August 31, 2020
  • Conference dates: December 11–12, 2020
  • Location: Metz, France

Prokofiev scholarship underwent a significant transformation in 2013 primarily through the consolidation of archival materials hosted at the Serge Prokofiev Archive at Columbia University. A first symposium to recognise this important moment was organized at Columbia University in April 2017. A partnership between Columbia and the University of Lorraine was instigated with a view to further developing and exploring these research materials and scholarship trends. Following on from a recent series of landmark publications on Prokofiev and his music (notably Morrison, Seinen, Asaro, Guillaumier, McAllister), this colloquium aims to continue its interrogation of primary sources and personal documents.

Prokofiev travelled extensively, lived in several countries, explored several continents, and interacted with an incredible number of his contemporaries – musicians, writers, chess players, publishers, poets, painters, journalists – the list is a long one. Prokofiev, himself very inspired by literature, left several autobiographical works but also little studied stories and short stories. Due to the unique nature of his geographical and artistic background, the question of the multiplicity of cultural, political and artistic contexts over which he may have had an influence or been influenced by, is particularly relevant since it has left a trace on the sources that have come to us today. The multiplicity of genres that Prokofiev worked with throughout his career, from chamber music to film music, from concert pieces to children’s stories, from operas to incidental music, from ballet to Romances, has generated an incredible number of diverse sources, preserved in multiple places. This symposium is intended to provide an interdisciplinary opportunity to deepen current research into these sources and to stimulate new perspectives.

Scientific Committee
Natalia Ermolaev, Columbia University
Christina Guillaumier, Royal College of Music
Laetitia Le Guay, Université de Cergy-Pontoise
Nicolas Moron, Université de Lorraine
Natalia Savkina, Conservatoire Tchaïkovsky de Moscou

Keynote speakers
Rita McAllister, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
Simon Morrison, Princeton University

Re-envisaging Music: Listening in the Visual Age

Siena – Accademia Musicale Chigiana
10-12 December 2020

Keynote Speaker Prof. Leslie Korrick
(School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, York University, Toronto):
“Listening in the Age of Sound Art”

Music and images, seeing and hearing have always been inextricably linked. Even when more autonomous concepts of music developed at various times through the centuries, they arguably served to keep at bay the ever-present visual dimensions of the act of listening. When we listen to music, do we just listen? When we see a painting, or anything else, do we just watch?

The last few decades, however, have witnessed the advent of an ever more pervasive visuality. From the development of technology to social media to special effects, seeing is foregrounded like never before. What does this mean for music? How do music’s materialities answer to the materialities of visual objects and arts? How does music answer to the demands of pictures? Do these new developments affect our listening and performance experiences? What categories are particularly useful to explain the connections between musical and visual domains? How are different musical traditions, from “classical” music and opera to jazz, popular and folk music being re- envisaged?

Possible topics for consideration include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • live performance
  • site-specific performance
  • installations/sound art
  • video performance
  • live broadcasting
  • pre-existing music as soundtrack
  • historically informed listening
  • places/spaces for performance
  • urban musicology

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

A selection of the conference papers will be published in the 2021 volume of Chigiana. Journal of Musicological Studies (https://journal.chigiana.org/).

Please send proposal to chigiana.journal@chigiana.org  by 25 June 2020.

Proposals should include:
– Title of paper
– Name of speaker(s)
– Institutional affiliation
– An abstract of c. 300 words

The papers should not exceed 30 minutes in duration.

Conference Committee: Antonio Cascelli, Tim Carter, Laura Leante, Allan Moore, Christopher Morris, Emanuele Senici

Organizing Committee: Nicola Sani, Stefano Jacoviello, Susanna Pasticci

The conference is organized within the 2020 Chigiana Project, Reshaping the Traditions. The project aims to explore the impact of the concepts of tradition in contemporary music culture, combining educational opportunities, music production and scientific research.

We are aware that there are still uncertainties in the current scenario; we will constantly monitor the situation and the measures that the Italian and other governments put in place and we hope that by December 2020 it will be possible to travel, so that the conference may go ahead as planned and we can meet in Siena. However, if necessary, we will be running the conference online.

Urban Nostalgia: The Musical City in the 19th and 20th Centuries

CFP: Urban Nostalgia: The Musical City in the 19th and 20th Centuries

EHESS, Paris

105 boulevard Raspail, Salle 13

July 3, 2020

Call for papers – deadline: 6 April 2020

https://www.ehess.fr/en/node/16865

The aim of this workshop is to explore space through music, approaching the history of the city via the notion of nostalgia. Often described as a form of homesickness, nostalgia is, by definition, the feeling that makes us wish to repossess or reoccupy a space. Such spaces appear to us as both near and distant, tangible and remote, and it seems that attempts at reclaiming them are frequently musical in nature. We know, for instance, that particular compositions have played important roles in helping people to navigate or mitigate a sense of displacement. In these circumstances, affective experiences may be bound up with trauma or joy, as is the case of song during wartime or musical imaginaries among migrants. Under other conditions, we might identify a ‘second-hand nostalgia’ in the guise of a musically-inflected tourism that seeks to reactivate (for pleasure and/or profit) the historical aura of an urban site. What are we to make of the abundance of personal, inter-personal, and propositional episodes that posit music as some kind of a bridge to the urban past?

One option is to turn to digital humanities and to recent trends in mapping the musical layers and pathways of city life. Yet, how well do such methods account for the emotional force of nostalgia and for the flickering between presence and absence that seems to characterise the musical grasp of the past? It is notoriously difficult to geo-locate affect and it is for this reason that we are looking to the kinds of mapping that music enables without the use of digital tools. How might we revisit compositions, correspondence, film music, opera, music criticism, etc. as techniques of urban nostalgia? Of course, these questions are not entirely new. But even as the so-called ‘urban musicology’ offers alternatives to traditional narratives of musical history, replacing big names with city streets, it sometimes remains unclear what the deeper relationships between musical practice and urban experience may be. We seek to address this lacuna by asking:

1) how composers, interpreters and other cultural actors have codified the city in musical terms;

2) how particular cities have afforded particular kinds of listening for particular groups at articular times; and

3) how music has contributed to the repertoire of clichés about urban identity, whether understood from ‘within’ or from the ‘outside.’

Another context for this conference is the growth of sound studies, which has made the notion of a ‘soundscape’ an unavoidable point of reference when describing links between music and urban atmospheres. In light of such work we aim to consider what the idea of a musical landscape or musicscape might offer to historically-sensitive and site-specific scholarship.

We welcome papers with a broad disciplinary grounding, including (but by no means limited to) musicology, history, cultural and sound studies, cultural geography, art history, and literature. We are also looking to include research – and researchers – that expand the geographical frame beyond Europe and Northern America, the areas favoured thus far by sound studies and technology and media studies.

We seek proposals that respond, but are not limited to the following themes:

-Music, memory, and nostalgia

-Music and mapping

-Recorded music and the city

-Musical clichés of space

-Music, space and emotions

-Music travel, and tourism

-Urban music and local vs. national identity

-Divisions of /bridges within the urban space through music

-Intermedia exchanges in the representation of the city: visual arts, literature, and film

-Site-specific musical works

-Music architecture, and urbanism

-Music and escapism: imaginary landscapes

-Mobile listening

-Music and noise pollution

Keynote lecture by Richard Elliott (Newcastle University), title tbc

Please note the quick turnaround for this call: abstracts of no more than 250 words are to be sent to musical.cities.2020@gmail.com no later than 6 April 2020. Accepted proposals will be announced on 17 April 2020. Please, include a short biography of no more than 100 words and your institutional affiliation. Proposals in both English and French will be accepted.

Scientific committee: Esteban Buch (CRAL / EHESS, Paris); Jonathan Hicks (University of Aberdeen); Gascia Ouzounian (University of Oxford); Lola San Martín Arbide (CRAL / EHESS, Paris); Christabel Sterling (University of Westminster); Justinien Tribillon (Theatrum Mundi).

Funded by the ‘Aural Paris’ project (Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 750086); organised by Lola San Martín Arbide (CRAL / EHESS, Paris).

“Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture” Conference 2020

Call for Papers!

We warmly welcome you all to a new LAHP student-led activities conference: Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture. We are excited to bring you two days of thought-provoking discussions designed to showcase new and emerging approaches to the study of gender construction and identity in American culture, addressing how femininities and masculinities are explored through the modes of music, literature, art, and wider media and cultural apparatus. The aim of this conference is to bring together PhD students and early career academics within the field of American Studies across departmental boundaries, enabling them to share their research and engage in collaborative debates surrounding the role of gender in a culturally and socio-politically tumultuous period of American culture; the twentieth century.

The conference will be held on Wednesday 10th June and Thursday 11th June 2020 in the historical and cultural epicenter of London, at King’s College London’s Strand Campus.

We specifically aim to pose the question: how can examinations of creative practices and cultural products enable a deeper understanding of regionally determined expressions of gendered identity? Whether participants challenge current discourse surrounding gender and American Studies, or discuss the ways in which we as academics shape and pursue the intersection of such disciplines, we intend to create a space wherein interdisciplinary research is produced, debated, and assessed; our call for papers encourages exchange between diverse fields of interest.

Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Articulations of gender and race, class, age, ability, sexuality, etc. in American culture, i.e. literature, music, film, audience engagement, reception, and participation
  • Exclusion and gender inequalities in American culture 
  • Collaborative practices and the creation of community
  • Cultural and social histories

How to Participate:

We are looking for 15 to 20 minute presentations, which may include formats such as films, digital artworks, lecture performances, etc.

Please submit an abstract (up to 250 words) outlining the paper’s main arguments, format, and relevance to the conference theme. Submissions should also include your institutional affiliation, paper title, 3-4 keywords, a short biography (up to 100 words), and your contact details.

Email both the proposal and biography to genderinamericaconference@kcl.ac.uk by 23.59 GMT on Wednesday, 15th April 2020.

More information is available at kclgenderinamericaconference.wordpress.com, including registration details.

Costs: Participation in and attendance to the conference is free*.
*Please note that while there are potential bursaries for travel expenses, all participants are responsible for covering the majority of costs including possible visa expenses and accommodation.

Keynote Speakers:

We are thrilled to announce our two Keynote Speakers: Dr. Rona Cran, Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre, and Assistant Professor Dr. Martin Lüthe, Assistant Professor of Culture.

Dr. Rona Cran
Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature
Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre
University of Birmingham, UK

Rona Cran is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature at the University of Birmingham, where she is also Director of the Centre for American and Canadian Studies. She is the author of Collage in Twentieth-Century American Art, Literature, and Culture (Ashgate/Routledge, 2014). Her current book project is entitled Multiple Voices: New York City Poetry, 1950-1995; she is also compiling a new anthology of New York City poetry, City of the World: Poems of New York (Fordham University Press, 2021). She has written or is writing articles on New York poetry, American women poet-editors and the mimeograph revolution, Joe Brainard and John Ashbery, Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg and collage, place, space and identity in Richard Yates, William Burroughs and eating, and William Burroughs and art.

Dr. Martin Lüthe
Assistant Professor
Department of Culture
Freie Universität Berlin (The Free University of Berlin), Germany

Martin Lüthe received his doctorate from the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture in Gießen. He is currently Einstein Junior fellow and assistant professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. Lüthe published the monographs “We Missed a Lot of Church, So the Music Is Our Confessional”: Rap and Religion (Lit Verlag, 2008) and Color-Line and Crossing-Over: Motown and Performances of Blackness in 1960s American Culture (WVT, 2011) and is working on a manuscript for Wire Writings: Media Change in the Culture of the Progressive Era.

Conference Organisers:

Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura is currently a PhD candidate in the Music Department at King’s College London supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership to pursue a thesis in Opera Studies. Previously, she completed her LLB and MSc in Political Science and Sociology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. She holds a Classical Vocal Studies Diploma from the Musical Horizons Conservatory in Athens and now performs as a Soprano. Her major academic interests are centered on gender studies, specialising in operatic femininities.

Robyn Shooter
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Robyn Shooter is a current PhD student enrolled in the Music department at King’s College London (KCL), undertaking a thesis examining constructions of identity and authenticity in alternative country music. She has previously completed an MMus in Musicology and Ethnomusicology (KCL), an MA in Cultural and Creative Industries (KCL), and holds a BA (Hons) in Comparative Literature (Queen Mary University of London). Robyn’s research is informed by her interdisciplinary background, with interests including popular culture in the United States, countercultural movements in twentieth-century America and Europe, regional identity and the American South, and nostalgic readings of Americana cultural heritage.

The Motherland Resurrected: Manifestations of Nationalism in Music Since the End of the ‘Short Twentieth Century’.

POSTPONED – Due to the ongoing Coronavirus crisis, this symposium is rescheduled for 2021. Confirmation of new date and new submission deadline will follow.

Venue: Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge
Date: 15 May 2020
Submission Deadline: 24 March 2020
Keynote speaker: Dr Ilana Webster-Kogen (SOAS University of London)

This symposium invites academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students from across the local community to explore and unpick how musical practices in the last thirty years have corresponded to and helped construct national self-identification, considering also how they may have problematised traditional conceptions of national identity.


Nationalism, among other concepts related to one’s identity with regard to ethnicity and the nation-state, is notoriously hard to define, as Benedict Anderson suggested in Imagined Communities (1983). Not long after Anderson’s infamous and thought-provoking publication, there was an upsurge of interest in nationalism in the early 1990s, following the revolutions of 1989, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the outbreak of nationalist wars in Yugoslavia and Rwanda.


It could be suggested that since the end of the Cold War, numerous detailed and thoughtful investigations into nationalism have somewhat exhausted the topic’s scholarly potential. Recent events and socio-political trends across the world, however, have seen new manifestations of nationalism that do not conform to conventional models. This suggests that nationalism is a persistent and dynamic phenomenon that needs continuous (re)investigation, with scholars and the media questioning if it is still on rise, whether the Second Cold War has begun or, in fact, whether the first one ever ended.


Thirty years after the 1989 revolutions, at a time when countries continue to write their controversial histories, we consider that it is the ideal moment to revisit the topic of nationalism and ask questions that take lessons from the past and critically analyse the present. Culture is the mirror of society and as music per se, unlike more verbal and visual art forms, lacks semantic meaning, it reflects its social situation in more subtle ways.

We encourage scholars across music studies to explore the relationship between nationalism and music, examining its potential for political mobilization and the causality between musical evocations of conceived national identity and political action and activism. We invite scholars, including those whose previous work is purely historical, to apply existing knowledge and methodologies to contemporary case studies of nationalism from all over the world. In so doing, this symposium aims to cultivate and nuance our understanding of how present and diverse political conditions and requirements are (re)defining conceptions of nationalism and how these are being mediated and problematised through various and disparate musical-cultural practices.


We invite proposals for individual or co-authored paper presentations and lecture recitals to musicandpolitics.cambridge2020@gmail.com. Please include a short biography of no more 150 words with your submission. The submission deadline is 24 March. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 31 March.


Guidelines for proposal submission:
Individual/co-authored paper presentations (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion) or lecture recitals (10 minutes lecture + 10 minutes recital + 10 minutes for discussion):
• Title and abstract of up to 300 words


If you are not interested in presenting but would still like to attend, please notify the organisers, Eirini Diamantouli and Ekaterina Pavlova, at musicandpolitics.cambridge2020@gmail.com.