Radio and the Sound of Modernism

12 June 2020

10 November 2020

Online.

The early years of radio broadcasting coincide with a high point for aesthetic modernism in literature, film and music: this conference explores how the radio has served as both its medium and muse. Having once been considered a ‘forgotten medium’, as Edward Pease and Everette Dennis put it (Pease and Dennis, 1995), the intervening twenty-five years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in the radio, particularly in the emerging disciplines of radio studies and sound studies. In musicology, too, the radio has been examined as an institutional setting for the experimentation of, for example, the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (Niebur, 2010) and composers of elektronische Musik at the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (Iverson, 2019). Taking radio as a focus for the study of musical modernism allows several different contemporary methodologies to be brought into conversation, from science and technology studies and actor-network theory to recent theorizations of “vernacular” or “popular” modernisms (Lacey, 2018; Nemmers, 2017) and sound studies’ concern for the political valences of listening (Radano and Olaniyan, 2016).

This conference seeks to bring together scholars from such established and emerging disciplines and provide a platform for new research on radio, modernism, and technological cultures of listening more broadly, from the birth of radio to the post-war era.

We invite proposals for papers (20 minutes with 5–10 minutes for questions) and organised sessions (three thematically linked papers, totalling 90 minutes) on topics including but not limited to:

  *   Institutional relationships between radio and musical or literary modernism;
  *   Literary, filmic and musical representations of the radio and radio listening;
  *   Modernist aesthetics and the technological affordances of radio;
  *   Radio, modernism and empire, nation, region;
  *   Radio, modernism and the high/low culture divide;
  *   Radio, modernism and the aesthetics of sensation;
  *   Radio as musical instrument in aleatory music and beyond.

Titles and abstracts of 250 words should be sent as a PDF, Word Doc, or Google Doc to radioandmodernism2020@gmail.com by 1 October 2020. Include your name and institutional affiliation, if applicable. Please specify in the proposal if you have technical requirements beyond audio-visual playback. Submissions will be anonymised when reviewed. Accepted participants will be notified by 12 October 2020.

https://radioandthesoundofmodernism.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Narrating Musicology: Reviewing the History/Histories of Musicology

Institute of Musicology, University of Bern, October 1st – 4th 2020

In November 1996, a musicological colloquium was held at University of Bern under the title Musikwissenschaft – eine verspätete Disziplin? (‘Musicology – a Delayed Discipline?’). The discussions and outcomes that took place were then published four years later in an anthology of the same title, edited by Anselm Gerhard. The aim of both the conference and the publication was to focus less on specific key people or institutions, and instead foreground general tendencies within the history of musicology: from its beginning in the late 19th century until the time of publication and with a scope also beyond the German-speaking world. Even if relatively late, this approach proved essential for considering the history of the musicological discipline as an object of study in itself.
More than twenty years later, and in light of the upcoming 100 years’ anniversary of the Institute of Musicology, Bern, which will take place in 2021, we now take the opportunity to once again reflect on these issues:
– What is the current state of the history of musicology as a discipline?
– How has the reflection on musicology changed current research as well as teaching contents?
– Can musicology still be understood as a “delayed discipline”?
Traditionally, musicology has been divided into three strands: historical musicology, systematic musicology and ethnomusicology. Additionally, related subjects – such as music theory and music pedagogy – have had an important impact on current research on the history of the discipline. The result of this, however, is that multiple and at times even isolated histories of musicology have developed. This conference focuses on these various narratives and aims at encouraging an inter- as well as intra-disciplinary dialogue.
The Bernese colloquium twenty years ago focused on the field of tension in musicology “between belief in progress and rejection of modernity”. The discrepancy between international orientation and national chauvinist tendencies, which were both present in the 1990s, were also addressed. The present conference asks, however, is this still the case today? It further queries whether the disclosure of the various narratives, as well as the culturally specific contradictions within the various sub-disciplines have changed the self-perception of musicology as a whole. How important are national factors in shaping the principal focus of the discipline’s history nowadays? This conference focuses on the various narratives that have evolved within our field and questions the motivations which have led to these various regional histories. Therefore, the focus shall be extended beyond Western academic perspectives to a more global, and thus multifaceted approach.
Another important aspect of this conference is the question of why we should study the history of our discipline at all.
– What kind of interaction is at play when on the one hand we focus on disciplinary self-reflection and on the other, on our objects of study?
– What are the objects of study of the history of academic disciplines?
–  On the topic of musicology’s protagonists: who is responsible for narrating the histories of musicology?
–  Is the historiography of disciplines an area of study where methodological and content-related interpretation can be applied?
– How much power do various institutions have in shaping and constructing the narratives surrounding musicology?
–  What roles do these narratives play in shaping the identities of scientists, institutions and various schools of thought?
– How can musicologists deal with the history of musicology in the digital age?
The conference aims to provide a platform where discussions can happen across different generations and between the various sub-disciplines of musicology, music theory and music pedagogy.
The conference’s core-topics are:
– Reflections on the various histories within musicology (regional, national and international, as well as inter- and intra-disciplinary practice)
– The interaction between musicology’s self-reflexion and our objects of study (protagonists, methods, institutions, the digital age)
We invite you to send your proposals (max. 300 words) for one of the following categories: individual papers (20 minutes plus 10 minutes of discussion);  Panels (3 related papers of 1.5 hours in total); Poster presentations;  Roundtables (4 shorter presentations of 15 minutes each plus a chaired discussion; 2 hours in total); Presentation of films, audio or other media.
Please submit your abstracts to narratingmusicology@musik.unibe.ch by the 16th of February 2020. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously and should therefore not contain the names of the authors. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of March 2020.
Further information:
www.narratingmusicology.home.blog

Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology. EAA 2020.

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

Rupert Till (and Raquel Jiménez and Margarita Díaz-Andreu)

Prof. Rupert Till PhD FHEA CMgr MCMI
Professor of Music
Associate Dean for International
School of Music, Humanities and Media
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield | Queensgate | Huddersfield | HD1 3DH
http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=smusrt
http://rupertchill.wordpress.com

Music and Change Before and After 1990

Baltic Musicological Conference 2020

MUSIC AND CHANGE BEFORE AND AFTER 1990

Vilnius, 10–12 September 2020

CALL for papers to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020

  • Organized by the Department of Music History at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, the Lithuanian-Polish research project “Music of Change: Expression of Liberation in Polish and Lithuanian Music Before and After 1989” and the Musicological Section of the Lithuanian Composers’ Union

The employment of music as a form of cultural opposition and transformative power is a multifunctional process that implies an extension of the thematic and disciplinary borders to the complex relations of the music’s cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts. However, such approach requires to provide a space for deep engagements in music and its various worlds overcoming a simplified understanding of musical practices as a reflection of social structures and political processes. As Jacques Attali writes on the relationship between music and societal structures, music “makes audible the new world that will gradually become visible, that will impose itself and regulate the order of things; it is not only the image of things, but the transcending of the everyday, the herald of the future” (Attali 1985).

Baltic Singing Revolution – “revolution by singing and smiling” (Heinz Valk 1988) – is a widely known example of the public expressive cultural practice which had a stimulating effect on cultural imagination and political change. Remembering the year 1990, so important but not limited to national histories of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, the Baltic musicological conference 2020 aims to acquire new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the ways in which the musical expression of liberation and musicians’ networks contributed to political and cultural change before and after the end of the Cold War. In what ways the musical practices contributed to formation, negotiation and transformation of sociocultural identities and changing collectivities? What has been the relationship between the processes of cultural and political change before and after 1990? What were prominent ideas, landmark cultural texts and influential individuals who have had a formative and transformative power in these processes? To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the 20th–21st-century music and change in the widest sense, we invite the proposals for the Baltic musicological conference 2020, to be held at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre in Vilnius 10–12 September 2020. The conference will include international guest speakers Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Gintautas Mažeikis (Vytautas Magnus University) and Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University).

Academic committee

Małgorzata Janicka-Słysz (Academy of Music in Kraków), Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli (Lithuanian Composers’ Union), Rima Povilionienė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre), Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University), Iwona Sowińska-Fruhtrunk (Academy of Music in Kraków), Rūta Stanevičiūtė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre)

Local organizing committee

Zita Abramavičiūtė, Ingrida Jasonienė, Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli, Rima Povilionienė (vice-chair), Rima Rimšaitė, Rūta Stanevičiūtė (chair), Judita Žukienė

Submission

The conference language is English. There will be two options: individual papers and panels (of 3 or 4 presenters).

  • Papers: We invite abstracts of no longer than 300 words, including keywords and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.
  • Panels: The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (300 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. 

Please submit proposals as a doc/odt/rtf attachment to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020. The following format should be used:

  • Name, affiliation and contact email address
  • Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper)
  • Title of presentation
  • Abstract (300 words maximum; in the case of panels, include a general abstract followed by individual abstracts, in total 1200 words maximum)
  • Keywords (5 maximum)
  • References (optional, 10 maximum)
  • CV (100 words maximum; in case of panels, CVs of all participants)

Accepted speakers will be informed by mid-April 2020.

The conference registration fee both for Oral Presenters and Non-Presenters/Listeners – 30 EUR, student registration fee – 15 EUR, onsite payment.

The fee includes attendance to the conference sessions, conference material, coffee breaks and conference reception, social program events.

Information about registration and accommodation will be sent after acceptance of proposals.

The selected papers will be invited for publication in the international peer-reviewed scientific journal “Lithuanian Musicology” (indexed in SCOPUS, EBSCO, RILM).

The conference organizers look forward to receiving your submissions!

More info:

Prof. Dr. Rima Povilionienė

balticconference2020@lmta.lt

Religion and Magnificence – Music and Ceremonies at the European Courts in 17th and 18th Centuries

Call for Papers

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Religion and magnificence – music and ceremonies at the European courts in 17th and 18th centuries.

Queluz National Palace (Lisbon, Portugal)

July 3rd – 5th, 2020

Organization:

Divino Sospiro – Centro de Estudos Musicais Setecentistas de Portugal 

Scientific Committee:

Cristina Fernandes, Francesco Cotticelli, Giuseppina Raggi, José Camões,

Iskrena Yordanova, Paologiovanni Maione, Ricardo Bernardes 

DS-CEMSP 8th International Conference is going to be held from July 3rd through July 5th, 2020 at the National Palace of Queluz (Portugal). This year the event is dedicated to the phenomenon of religious ceremonies at the European courts and palaces during the ancient régime. These demonstrations of magnificence had the function to represent the royal power through the image of piety, moral stance, divine favour and order, and often included musical and theatrical forms of presentation. The conference aims to promote a multidisciplinary dialogue on topics which explore different aspects of religious manifestations at court and the uses of music in the theatralization of royal ceremonies and rituals, calling for the participation of researchers of various areas of studies. Topics as following will be considered:

  • The Royal Chapels and their activity
  • Religious music and representation of the royal power
  • Repertoires, performance practice, dissemination and adaptation of genres across Europe
  • Ceremonial, liturgy and music
  • Oratorios at European courts and noble palaces
  • The court and the city: religious festivals and processions 

Scholars are invited to submit individual proposals with the maximum length of 20 minutes per paper. Session proposals will be accepted as well: a maximum of three or four papers will be taken into consideration, and the session should not exceed 1h30. 

A selection of the presented papers will be published in our book series Cadernos de Queluz.

Official languages of the conference are Portuguese, English, Italian and Spanish.
Abstracts in Word format (.doc), should not exceed 300 words.

Please enclose in the same file brief curriculum vitae of 150 words max., providing your name and surname, postal address, e-mail and telephone number, as well as your institutional affiliation.

Deadline for sending abstracts is March 15th, 2020

E-mail: cemsp@sapo.pt

Web: https://www.divinosospiro.org/cemsp.html

The scientific board will examine all abstracts by March 29th, 2020 and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter.

Tzlil Meudcan 2020

The Musicology Department at the Hebrew University and Tzlil Meudcan Festival invite graduate and postgraduate students in musicology to submit applications for the Tzlil Meudcan musicological roundtables, Tel Aviv, July 4-9, 2020. Roundtables will be held in parallel with festival program whose thematic focus this year is “Patterns”.

The musicological sessions will feature a public symposium (July 4) followed by daily roundtables on the festival’s program and assigned reading on various related topics (July 6-9). Discussions will be led by Prof. Martin Iddon (University of Leeds) and Dr. Assaf Shelleg (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem). Successful candidates will enjoy a free pass to the entire festival program in addition to reduced accommodation costs at the Gilgal hotel in Tel Aviv, where all festivals guests will be accommodated allowing a mutual vibrant environment right off the beautiful coast line of Tel Aviv.

Applicants should submit a statement outlining their research interests (250 words) in addition to a biographical sketch. Please submit your application at tzlilmeudcan@outlook.com

Submission deadline: January 30, 2020.

Low End Theories: Understanding Bass Music and Culture Study Day

It’s my great pleasure to formally open the Call for Participation for Low End Theories: Understanding Bass Music and Culture.

This will be a joint BFE/RMA Study Day at the University of Bristol next year, on Saturday 16 May 2020.

Keynote speaker: DJ Krust aka Kirk Thompson

Visit the website to read the CfP and join the mailing list for future updates: http://lowendtheories2020.wordpress.com/

The deadline for submissions is Friday 31 January 2020.

With a steadily increasing array of academic publications in the field reflecting bass music’s global popularity and value, we believe the organisation of an interdisciplinary conference on this topic in the lively city of Bristol is both timely and relevant to a broad audience.

Enquiries: lowendtheories2020@gmail.com

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/517207328794359/

Twitter: #LowEnd2020

Musicology and Its Future in Times of Crises

CALL FOR PAPERS

Musicology and Its Future in Times of Crises

International Conference on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Department of Musicology, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb

Zagreb, 27-28 November 2020 – deadline extension: 20 March 2020

Narratives of crisis seem to be a persistent condition of every generation’s history. Aside from their presence in everyday life and the fact that they are ingrained in the social and political sphere, discourses on crisis have become an inextricable feature of contemporary scholarship itself, perceivable in debates on the crisis of knowledge, reflections on the devaluation of the humanities, and discussions on the changing conditions of academic labour. Coupled with growing anxieties about the precarious position of musicological disciplines within the neoliberal university and larger systems of scholarship, these discourses condition the environment in which musicological research is conducted in an important way, bear upon the ways knowledge is (re)produced, and inevitably (although not always perceptibly) shape disciplinary futures.

Scholars across the field of music studies are invited to reflect on and address the issues proposed in the three thematic streams outlined below, as well as to contribute to the broader topic of the conference by sharing insights and reflections gained through their experience and research. We invite proposals for individual or co-authored paper presentations and/or themed panels.

STREAMS:

1. Reflecting on the Crisis of Musicological Knowledge

2. Responding to the Crisis of (Ir)Relevance

3. Resisting the Crisis of Academic Labour

4. Related research

 

1. Reflecting on the Crisis of Musicological Knowledge

At the level of musicological knowledge, the crisis manifests itself in the permanent doubts regarding the foundations of musicology and consequently in the vivid proliferation of disciplinary “turns”. In the moment of crisis, existing musicological knowledge is considered to be untenable and the limitations of its premises become evident. In such cases epistemology speaks of “paradigm changes”, which reveals as much as it hides about what is actually at stake. But what is going on in such

moments of crisis of musicological knowledge? Do paradigm changes in musicology imply a certain automatism? Do they occur consensually? Do they proceed without any resistance?

The first thematic stream could therefore focus on the following questions: Who has the right to announce the untenability of certain musicological knowledge? Is one obliged to follow such announcements? Does that right depend on the centrality or marginality of the position from which one speaks? How does such positioning define the relations between different national traditions of the discipline and between different subdisciplines within music studies? Are paradigm changes something that could be put into a programme or a manifesto (announcing a certain “musicology of the future” as the future of musicology)? Could the crisis of musicological knowledge be solved by importing perspectives from another discipline? Why do research paradigms change from time to time in certain settings, whereas in others they seem to be resilient to change? How do musicological paradigms age? Could the once outdated paradigms have any future?

2. Responding to the Crisis of (Ir)Relevance

The idea behind this thematic stream is to bring forward issues and modes of responding to crises within and outside of academia, with the tools of musicological scholarly knowledge. How could we today – more than twenty-five years after Philip Bohlman’s (1993) call – conceive of musicology as a political act? Although this question resonated across different musicological subfields, there is still room to consider whether subdisciplinary divisions helped or aggravated musicology’s relevance and visibility as well as its social responsibility.

Some of the questions that could be considered within this stream are: In the light of humanitarian emergencies, how can musicological epistemology help humanity and is there still room for academic activism? What is the role of musicology in the age of postmodern crisis of knowledge and post-truth – how can the discipline cope with the challenges and what is its responsibility within this context? In the current cultural and educational policies, where humanities are increasingly being pushed aside by market-oriented sciences, what are the arguments in favour of the discipline’s relevance, and how can musicology help in restoring the social awareness of the importance of humanities? No less important, who are musicology’s audiences today and what is the future of the discipline and its subfields within these contexts?

3. Resisting the Crisis of Academic Labour

It seemingly goes without saying that the labour of practicing, developing, and (re)imagining musicology rests almost exclusively on the shoulders of the scholars themselves. The issues of the complex intricacies of academic labour in musicology, nevertheless, still belong to one of the least-researched and only occasionally discussed topics in the discipline itself. Through this thematic stream, we encourage scholars to reflect on the changing conditions of academic labour in a historical perspective as well as contemporary institutional practices and offer their perception on the myriad ways organisational governance, the extensification/intensification of work and individual(ized) responses to structural transformations of workplace affect the sustainability and future of musicological disciplines.

Some of the following questions are aimed at opening the space for further discussion within this stream: How do the structural features of contemporary universities and other academic institutions affect our everyday experiences of research and teaching? How and why do the individual (gendered, classed, racialized etc.) experiences of academics seem to escape our critical attention? How does the increasing scarcity (luxury?) of time dedicated solely to (funded?) research affect the development of the discipline of musicology? How do contemporary pressures of competitiveness and dictate of “measurable” excellence stand in relation to mutual support and solidarity among scholars? What does the exclusive reliance on short- term project-based market-oriented funding bring to the survival of smaller disciplines and the precariousness of academic labour in them? What is the (emotional, mental, corporeal, existential) cost of work (not) being done (Gill 2010)?

4. Related Research

Beside the above outlined thematic streams, we welcome research-based contributions to other aspects of the broader symposium topic of musicology and its future.

 

Keynote Speaker

Nicholas Cook, University of Cambridge

Conference language: English

Conference website:

http://www.muza.unizg.hr/zgmusicology50/en/category/conference/

Guidelines for proposal submission:

• individual or co-authored papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes discussion):

  • title and abstracts of up to 300 words, up to 6 keywords

themed panel sessions of three or four individual papers (60 minutes + 15 minutes discussion)

  • title and abstracts of up to 300 words per paper
  • panel title, and up to 300 words outlining the general theme of the panel, up to 6 keywords

Due Date and Submission

Costs

The costs of travel and accommodation will be covered by participants. The registration fee is €50 (€30 for PhD students). It covers the costs of conference materials, coffee breaks and refreshments as well as the conference reception.

Venue

The symposium will be held at the Academy of Music in Zagreb, Trg Republike Hrvatske 12, 10000 Zagreb

Program Committee

  • Ivan Ćurković (chair), Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Samuel Araujo, School of Music, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)
  • Zdravko Blažeković, Graduate Center of the City University, New York
  • Hana Breko Kustura, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Zagreb
  • Ana Čizmić Grbić, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Naila Ceribašić, Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research, Zagreb
  • Dalibor Davidović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Monika Jurić Janjik, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Vjera Katalinić, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Zagreb
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Mojca Piškor, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Ingrid Pustijanac, Department of Musicology and Cultural Heritage, University of Pavia
  • Cornelia Szabó-Knotik, Institute for Musicology and Performance Studies, University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna
  • Jelka Vukobratović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb

Local Arrangements Committee

  • Ivan Ćurković (chair), Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Ana Čizmić Grbić, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Dalibor Davidović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Monika Jurić Janjik, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Mojca Piškor, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Jelka Vukobratović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb

 

Responses in Music to Climate Change

The Barry S. Brook Center for Music Research and Documentation at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York announces the multidisciplinary international conference

Responses in Music to Climate Change

to be held at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, 21–23 April 2020

The deleterious effects of anthropogenic climate change continue to shape music making in a post-industrial, global society. Indigenous communities—those typically least responsible for the carbon emissions that have contributed to global warming—face the elimination or depletion of natural resources necessary for their musical practices and traditions. Composers of art music, many compelled to bear witness to our current times and bring awareness to threatened ecosystems, draw sound material from endangered environmental sources. Popular music, too, continues to respond through concerts, songs that thematize the environment, and celebrity endorsements for protection measures. Across all forms of music making, discourses of preservation, sustainability, visibility, and action are pervasive.

With the aim of collecting and sharing research on music’s place within the context of anthropogenic climate change, this conference welcomes contributions from a broad range of disciplines. A multidisciplinary approach not only seeks to capitalize on the wide range of ontological frameworks that each field brings, but also foregrounds the necessity for clear communication and criticism within and between disciplines. Increasingly, studies that address climate change and notions of environment point to the limitations of common categories for sound and music. As the problem is a human one, we hope to tackle the perennial question of how to develop vocabularies that transcend the boundaries of specialized jargon. Simply put, to confront a shared problem, we must develop strategies and techniques that address its complexities in a language accessible to all. A precondition for inciting and facilitating action is the widespread comprehension of the stakes, difficulties, and necessities as a global community.

We are excited to have Dr. Ana María Ochoa Gautier, Department of Music/Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University, as our keynote speaker.

We seek to inspire papers and panels on the following themes:

  • Music and acoustic ecology
  • Environmental sound sources in composition
  • The sounds of endangered lands
  • Sustainability
  • Perspectives on sonic environments
  • Music and globalization/industrialization
  • Sonic ecologies
  • Politics
  • Sound studies

Please submit a proposal, with title and an abstract of no more than 300 words, and include contact information (address, phone, and email). Proposals for papers, whole panels, posters, and lecture-recitals are welcome.

Proposals may be submitted before January 13, 2020 to:

Michael Lupo

The Barry S. Brook Center for Music Research and Documentation

The City University of New York, The Graduate Center

365 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY 10016-4309

mlupo@gradcenter.cuny.edu

Further information will be posted at https://brookcenter.gc.cuny.edu

SONG STUDIES 2020 – Exploring Interdisciplinary Approaches to Songs and Practices of Singing (1200-today)

Ghent University, 1-3 July 2020

Deadline call for papers: 20 December 2019

Keynote speaker: Monique Scheer (Tübingen University)

The singing voice is a medium of expression that is found in all times and cultures. People have always been singing, not only to perform entertainingly, but also to express emotions or to embody identities. This has for example made collective singing (and listening) practices a primary way for people to articulate and embody the identities that are fundamental to the existence of social groups. The bodily and sensory experience of moving and sounding together in synchrony, enables individuals to experience feelings of togetherness with others.

Song is the versatile medium facilitating such processes. Songs can evoke and channel emotions, employing them for specific (or less specific) means. As a multimodal genre, song enables not only the articulation and embodiment of ideas; as an inherently oral and intangible medium, songs can move through space and time, transgressing any material form. Therefore, songs have proven an ideal tool for the distribution of news, contentious ideas, or mobilising messages.

This conference aims to bring together researchers from various disciplines investigating song (for example musicology, literary studies, history, sociology, performance studies, cognition studies, anthropology, etc.). The focus will be on the definition of possible approaches to the study of this medium (both in its material and performed existence), its performances (in any form) and reception (in any context). Research examples may cover songs written and sung in any culture and language, and any (historical) period. Common ground will be found through concepts, approaches and methodologies, encouraging an interdisciplinary and transhistorical dialogue, breaking ground for a new research field: song studies.

Possible research areas and questions to be explored are:

  • how to study the multimodality of the genre, acknowledging both textual and musical characteristics, and its performative nature;
  • the sensory/bodily and emotional/affective experience of listening and singing;
  • cognitive and/or affective processes of singing (and collective singing practices);
  • how to study the performative aspects of songs in historical contexts;
  • the ‘power’/agency of song;
  • the role of song and singing in social processes and historical developments; etc. We invite proposals for 20-minute individual papers (max. 300 words) or alternative formats (pre- submission inquiry is encouraged). As the aim of this conference is to facilitate dialogue, there will be ample time for discussion and exchange. Please send your proposal, including your name, academic affiliation and a short biographical note, no later than 20 December 2019 to renee.vulto@ugent.be. For more information and registration, see www.songstudies.ugent.be.