International Conference ‘Explicitly Intertextual Music since 1890’

Gdańsk, 23rd-24th May 2019

organized by the Stanisław Moniuszko Academy of Music in Gdańsk, Institute of Music Theory

Call for papers

Intertextuality, as a concept of contemporary knowledge on literature and art, is – according to Ryszard Nycz – ‘a category used to define this dimension of construction and meaning of a text (a work of art), which points to irremovable, intrinsic dependence of its creation, object status and reception on the existence of other texts and archi-texts (stylistic-specific rules, discursive-generic conventions, semiotic-cultural codes), as well as on the ability of persons participating in cultural cognition and communication process to recognise these inter- and archi-textual references’. What are the possibilities and limitations connected with transposing this category into the situation of music understood as a message?

In the 20th and 21st century there have been many composers who, in different ways, referred to traditional forms, genres, styles, conventional measures or techniques; they cited, paraphrased or transformed, in a specific manner, other musical ‘texts’. Those strategies became norms of their own compositional ‘languages’. Among these composers were, for example, Gustav Mahler, Charles Ives, Igor Stravinsky, Benjamin Britten, George Rochberg, Alfred Schnittke, David Del Tredici, Vladimir Martynov, Salvatore Sciarrino, Wolfgang Rihm, Michael Daugherty, Paweł Szymański, Osvaldo Golijov, Thomas Adès, Jörg Widmann, Maxim Kolomiiets, Andrzej Kwieciński. Are we able to recognise all the references to other texts, made by the above-mentioned composers? Which inter- and archi-texts evoke our quicker reactions? What are the benefits of recognising inter- or archi-texts?

The conference will address two groups of issues: (1) theoretical, methodological and aesthetic aspects of intertextuality in music in critical approaches, (2) interpretation of explicitly intertextual works from the area of classical, film, theatre and jazz music. We suggest that the following issues could be considered:

  • Michael Riffaterre’s concept of interpretant and Ryszard Nycz’s concept of intertextual exponent as research tools in musicology
  • strategies for citing texts from the past and for composing them anew
  • references to stylistic norms and to generic and formal rules
  • intertextual poetics
  • memory of recipients and texts from the past
  • complex process of listening to and interpreting works which are explicitly intertextual
  • intertextuality and meanings of a text
  • intertextuality and the issue of authenticity
  • intermediality

Programme Committee: Violetta Kostka, Danuta Popinigis, Renata Skupin

The official language of the conference is English. Presentations should be 20 minutes in length, and will be followed by an additional 10 minutes for discussion. Titles and abstracts of maximum 300 words should be sent to v.kostka@amuz.gda.pl The proposals should also include name, affiliation, e-mail, telephone number, postal address and short biography. The deadline for submitting proposals is February 17th, 2019. The final decision of the committee on the selection of the papers will be announced no later than February 23rd, 2019. Selected papers are supposed to be published in English in a yearbook ‘Aspekty Muzyki’.

Conference fee: 90 EUR (academic researchers), 45 EUR (PhD candidates). The fee includes two lunches, reception, coffee breaks with refreshments and publicity. The organizers do not cover travel expenses or accomodation. All speakers whose papers are accepted for presentation will receive necessary information (including bank transfer details and list of suggested hotels and hostels) via e-mail.

Sensing Colonial Ports and Global History: Agency, Affect, Temporality

cpagh-logo

CALL FOR PAPERS [Deadline: 4 February 2019]

 

Sensing Colonial Ports and Global History: Agency, Affect, Temporality

2 May (full day) and 3 May (half day) 2019

TORCH, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities

University of Oxford

 

Keynote Speakers:

Leila Fawaz (History, Tufts University)

Benjamin Walton (Music, University of Cambridge)

 

Sensing Colonial Ports and Global History is an interdisciplinary two-day conference organised by the Colonial Ports and Global History (CPAGH) Network in TORCH Oxford (https://torch.ox.ac.uk/cpagh). Its aim is to cross-examine three key concepts – agency, affect and temporality – that are increasingly central to anthropological, historical, musicological and sociological thought about colonial port cities. In doing so, it also explores anew the implications of the ‘colonial port city’ for global history, both in and beyond the academy.

Within this framework, the conference will centre around three main concerns. The first relates to issues of agency and power, notably the ways in which actors and institutions interacted with different connections and connectors, as well as with disruptions and disruptors. On the one hand, we seek to further the critical study of colonial power and power relations between port cities. Taking into consideration the five ‘scapes’ Arjun Appadurai (1990) has identified for narrating patterns of globalisation, we also seek explorations of the ways in which colonial power demonstrated itself in different port cities. On the other hand, we seek, too, to move beyond the study of colonial ports as a tool to explain connections, and to examine port cities in their own right, thereby highlighting hitherto understudied voices, and uncovering new perspectives on connections and disruptions. In other words, we seek to explore how people in port cities variously experienced, navigated, negotiated as well as expressed in local vocabularies what ‘global’ connections and the ‘colonial port city’ were and meant in their everyday lives.

Second, the conference will highlight the role of senses in researching colonial histories. Taking our cue from Hearing History (Smith 2004), what does it mean to not only tune but also sense into an extended, yet uneven geography of colonial ports? The interconnectedness of these global hubs can detract from their significance as nodes shaped locally, and translocally, by an extensive range of affective registers. Their distinct performativities, listening practices and multi-sensory environments, for example – coupled with the various ways in which such registers are (not) documented, experienced and/or contested – raise intriguing questions about the role of the senses both within and across the colonial ports, and their implications for rethinking the so-called globality of the colonial ports. Furthermore, how might these ports – when ‘sensed’ as nodal cultures – more broadly inform the re/writing of global history with their particular affective registers?                                                         

Last but not least, we hope to bridge between new research on time, temporality and global history. The weight of historical inquiry on time has fallen heavily on Western Europe, where imperial expansion and advanced production and communication technologies revolutionised time-keeping practices and temporal habits. As the movement to regulate time across nations, empires end hemispheres grew stronger, it came into conflict with maritime as well as local regional temporalities that had been associated with the community, religion, environment, seasonal cycles and the sea regimes. Situated at the crossroads between local cultures and the increasingly regulated temporal regimes applied to trade and governance, port cities represent spaces that can facilitate and reveal tensions in the global transformation of time. How did the emerging rhythms of work and civic life in port cities come into contact with the existing ideas and practices of time? How was time negotiated between the increasing pressure of standardisation, and the environmentally and socially-embedded temporal traditions? To what extent did multiple understandings of time create a virtual spatio-temporal dissociation between port cities and their hinterland? Participants are encouraged to explore these questions, as well as connections and exchanges between temporal cultures that emerged in various port cities in the era of European imperialism.

We are delighted to have two distinguished keynote speakers: Leila Fawaz, Issam M. Fares Chair of Lebanese & Eastern Mediterranean Studies at Tufts University, whose broad expertise encompasses migration, trade and war in the modern Middle East;and Benjamin Walton, Senior Lecturer in Music at the University of Cambridge, whose rich expertise extends from touring opera troupes beyond Europe to the globalisation of opera in and beyond the nineteenth century.  

Scholars working in Anthropology, History, Musicology, Sociology and other related disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, who are interested in presenting at the conference, are asked to send an abstract of 250–400 words and a brief (1–2 page) CV to cpagh@torch.ox.ac.uk by Monday, 4 February 2019. We strongly encourage submissions from researchers from underrepresented backgrounds. Co-authored papers (with no more than two speakers) are also welcome.  

Sonic Circulations 1900-1950, Senate House, London, June 2019


Sonic Circulations 1900-1950: Musical Thought, Scientific Fantasies, Global Contexts

CfP Deadline: 15 January 2019

Senate House, University of London, 24-25 June 2019, in association with the Institute of Musical Research.

Confirmed keynote speakers: James Q. Davies (University of California, Berkeley), Gascia Ouzounian (University of Oxford)

Conference respondents: Gundula Kreuzer (Yale University), John Tresch (The Warburg Institute, London)

From the first human flight in 1903, to the aftermath of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, science and technology in the first half of the twentieth century veered between the utopian and the malevolent. Conceived as idea, as material, and as praxis, science and technology prompt questions about mediation, ethics, marginalisation, space, and power. The time is ripe to interrogate the place of sound and music within the social worlds, political structures, and discourses of the early twentieth century, a period shaped by global uncertainty, military conflict, human displacement, and the legacies of scientised colonialism.

This conference, the second meeting of the ‘Sonic Circulations’ research network, will explore the intersections of scientific, technological, and musical discourses in the global contexts of the first half of the twentieth century. We invite a wide range of papers positioned at the nexus of (ethno)musicology, cultural studies, STS, history of science, and sound studies. Responding to intensifying scholarly preoccupation with science, technology, and music in the Enlightenment and nineteenth century, this conference seeks to cast our attentions forward in time, bringing together scholars from diverse fields and academic contexts. In particular, submissions are encouraged to foreground social dynamics, to bring questions of power or historical erasure to bear where science, technology, and music meet, to interrogate hegemonies, or to expand the range of critical/theoretical perspectives and voices that might be mobilised in this field, particularly beyond those from overrepresented geographical centres.

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes + questions) or panels (90 minutes) are warmly invited. Abstracts may address, but need not be limited to:

– Modernity and temporality: futures and pasts

– Performing, staging, screening, and writing science, technology, music, and modernity

– Materials (including technologies of music: acoustics, recording, radio, scores etc)

– Abstractions, ideologies, metaphors (e.g. reciprocity between ideas in techno-scientific and musical thought and practice)

– People/agents, for instance relationships between scientists, technologists, musical thinkers, performers and others

– Power, coloniality (including labour, race, class, gender)

– Transnational perspectives, conflict and war

– Ethics and philosophy

– (Inter)-discipline and methodology

Abstracts of no more than 350 words should be sent to soniccirculations@gmail.com by 15 January 2018. Please include title, name, institutional affiliation (if applicable), and a short biography (50-80 words). Applicants will be notified of the outcome by mid-February.

There will be a registration fee for the conference, covering refreshments and lunches.

Programme Committee: Emily I. Dolan (Harvard University), Arman Schwartz (King’s College, London), Emily MacGregor (Harvard University/Royal Holloway, University of London).

For further queries please contact Dr Emily MacGregor: Emily.MacGregor@rhul.ac.uk

http://www.soniccirculations.com/londonconference

@SonCircNetwork

Music in the Disruptive Era: The Digital, the Internet and Beyond

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

14-16 December 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music in the Disruptive Era: The Digital, the Internet and Beyond», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 14 to 16 December 2019.

The conference aims to investigate the role of the Web and how all the tools related to it have changed the way we learn, approach ourselves and experience music. What are the new forms of music production and consumption through the web? And how has the way we learn music changed? Are new genres and creative processes born? How has the Web influenced the music market? And what are the new types of jobs in music making? Can Music professionalism survive the digital wilderness? Finally, the conference intends to investigate the development of increasingly effective tools useful for musicological research, such as, for instance, the dissemination of historical sources and updated archives, as well as online scientific literature and databases.The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas,although other topics are also welcome: 

  • New Forms of Music Production, Consumption and Reception through the Web
  • New Genres and Creative Processes
  • Musical Discoveries and Knowledge through the Web
  • The Web and Music Education
  •  Music and Liquid Modernity 
  • Music and the Digital Divide
  • The Web and the Music Market
  • New Kinds of Jobs in Music
  • The Web and Research in Music
  • Music Criticism and the Web
  • Sources, Libraries and the Web
  • The Web and Music Publishing
  • Impacts of Digital Media on Musical Performance and Programming
  • The Web, Music Copyright and other Legal Issues
  • Visualizing Music: Defining the Online Experience

Programme Committee

  • David Hurwitz (ClassicsToday.com)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Pedro Ordoñez Eslava (University of Granada)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynotes Speakers:

  • Georgina Born (University of Oxford)
  • Christine Hine (University of Surrey)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume. 

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography. 

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 5 May 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date. 

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala 

conferences@luigiboccherini.org 

www.luigiboccherini.org

RASMB-IMS 2019 Conference: MUSICAL AND CULTURAL OSMOSES IN THE BALKANS

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019

Call for Papers

The National University of Music in Bucharest in collaboration with the IMS Regional Association for the Study of Music of the Balkans announce an International Musicological Conference on the subject Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans. The conference will take place at the National University of Music Bucharest, on 2–6 September, 2019.

The purpose of the International Musicological Conference is to promote interaction, research, discussion and intercultural dialogue among musicologists, ethnomusicologists, researchers and students from Romania, the Balkans and other countries with an interest on the different local musical traditions in South-East Europe and their interactions to the Mediterranean and broader region.

The conference strongly encourages debating subjects such as art music in the Balkans and its interactions with Western Europe traditions, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine chant, methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Ethnomusicology/Music Anthropology of the Balkans, current issues and approaches in Music Education in the Balkans, music and political regimes.

Proposal may address (but are not limited to) the following categories that fall under the topic of the conference:

  1. Art Music in the Balkans
  2. Byzantine and post-Byzantine chant
  3. Musical encounters: Silk roads across Mediterranean area to Asia
  4. Ethnomusicology – Anthropology
  5. Methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Music Theory
  6. Music and politics

The official conference language is English. However, participants can present in Romanian, having submitted prior to the conference and at a set deadline a translation of the final paper in English.

Proposals are invited for:

  • 20-minute papers
  • Panels of up to four presentations (90 minutes).

Abstracts of 20-minute papers should not exceed 300 words and panels’ proposals should contain the description of the panel’s subject (no more than 100 words) and an abstract (no more than 300 words) for each paper included in the panel.

All proposals should be sent electronically as an attachment to the following email address: IMS2019bucharest@unmb.ro with the subject line: Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans.

The attachment should include the following information as well:

  • Name(s) of the author(s) and institution affiliation (if applicable)
  • Type of proposal
  • Title of the paper/panel proposal
  • Short biographical note of the author(s) (100 words)

Full audiovisual equipment and adequate technical support is available for all presentations.

Important dates:

  • Abstracts of proposals/panels: no later than 31 December 2018
  • Notification of approval: no later than 28 February 2019
  • Submission of finalised papers (only in cases of translated papers from Romanian to English): no later than 1 August 2019

Registration fees:

Participants: 30 Euros (10 Euros for students, including PhD candidates)

Date and venue:

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019, National University of Music Bucharest, 33 Știrbei Vodă Str., Sector 1, 010102 Bucharest, Romania (http://www.unmb.ro).

Contact information:

Further instructions and details will soon be posted on the conference webpage: ims2019bucharest.ro.
See also: http://www.musicology.org/networks/ra/rasmb
Announcements will also appear on the webpage of the National University of Music Bucharest (http://www.unmb.ro) and the New Europe College (http://www.nec.ro).

Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music

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CFP. Submission deadline: December 15, 2018

Música Analítica 2019:
Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Porto, Portugal: March 21–23, 2019

http://artes.porto.ucp.pt/pt/central-eventos/musica-analitica-2019-porto-international-symposium-analysis-and-theory-music

The Research Center for Science and Technology in the Arts (CITAR) at the School of Arts, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, invites the submission of paper proposals to Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music, taking place in Porto, Portugal, March 21-23, 2019.

The symposium promotes the notion of music as analysis and analysis as music – a gloss on “música analítica”- arguing that our discursive modes of analysis are not outside of music or simply an enriching addition we bring to it but rather integral to the way we may experience, conceive, and music. In short, implicit or explicit analysis is implicated in the way we reframe, process, and construct time and sound, including aspects such as gesture or communal experience into/as music.

The symposium’s thematic range is inclusive, welcoming submissions from a variety of perspectives on music analysis and theory (speculative, practical, historical) or attendant to the multifarious intersections with disciplines such as music history, composition, critical theory, ethnomusicology, performance, sound art, mathematics, cognitive sciences, and technology. In addition, pedagogical approaches that address methodological and social implications of music analysis are particularly encouraged.

Reflecting the scope of the meeting, the symposium will feature the following speakers:

Keynote Speakers:

  • Richard Cohn (Yale University)
  • Judit Frigyesi (Bar-Ilan University)
  • Sílvio Ferraz (Universidade de São Paulo)

Plenary Speakers:

  • Bianca Temes (Music Academy, Cluj)
  • Christopher Bochmann (Universidade de Évora)
  • Isabel Pires (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
  • José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • Michiel Schuijer (Conservatorium van Amsterdam)
  • Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira (CITAR, ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Moreno Andreatta (IRCAM, CNRS, UPMC-Paris)
  • Miguel Borges Coelho (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Naomi Waltham-Smith (University of Warwick)
  • Paulo Ferreira de Castro (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
  • Steve Rings (University of Chicago)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
We invite scholars from various disciplines to contribute to this international symposium (the language of the symposium is English). Please send a proposal for an oral communication (20′ presentation +10′ discussion) no later than December 15, 2018, to the email: musicaanalitica2019@porto.ucp.pt. We project a response by Jan 5, 2019.

The proposal should consist of two separate pdf. files:

  • (1) Title of the communication and an abstract detailing your topic, approach, argument, and main findings, with a max. 350 words. Also include 5 keywords, and up to 8 bibliographic references. The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, proposal, MA2019].
  • (2) Information about the author(s): Name, Institutional affiliation, e-mail, title of the talk, and a short biographical note (max. 150 words). The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, info, MA2019]

__________

Organizing Committee

  • José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Sofia Serra (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Daniel Moreira (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
  • Paulo Perfeito (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
  • Telmo Marques (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)

Scientific Committee
[Plenary Speakers listed above are also SC members]

  • Adriana Lopes Moreira (Universidade de São Paulo)
  • Áine Heneghan (University of Michigan)
  • André Perrotta (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • António Augusto Aguiar (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Antonio Grande (Conservatorio di Musica “G. Verdi” di Como)
  • Benoît Gibson (Universidade de Évora)
  • Carlos Caires (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
  • Carlos Guedes (New York University, Abu Dhabi)
  • Catello Gallotti (Conserv. di Musica “Giuseppe Martucci” di Salerno)
  • Eduard Resina (Escola Superior de Música de Catalunya)
  • Gilberto Bernardes (INESC TEC/Univ. do Porto and Univ. de Aveiro)
  • Ildar Khannanov (Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University)
  • Jean-Pierre Bartoli (Sorbonne Université)
  • João Pedro d’Alvarenga (CESEM, Univ. Nova Lisboa)
  • João Pedro Paiva de Oliveira (Universidade de Aveiro)
  • John Koslovsky (Conservatorium van Amsterdam; Utrecht Univ.)
  • Manuel Pedro Ferreira, (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova Lisboa)
  • Mário Baroni (Università di Bologna)
  • Mattia Bergomi (Fund. Champalimaud, Center for the Unknown)
  • Mine Dogantan-Dack (University of Cambridge)
  • Nicolas Meeùs (SBAM, and IReMus)
  • Paulo de Tarso Salles (Universidade São Paulo)
  • Pedro Pestana (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • Robert Hasegawa (McGill University)
  • Rodolfo Coelho de Souza (Universidade de São Paulo)
  • Rui Penha (INESC TEC/Universidade do Porto)
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela (University of Zagreb)
  • Sérgio Azevedo (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
  • Sigrun Heinzelmann (University Mozarteum Salzburg)
  • Sławomira Zeranska-Kominek (University of Warsaw)
  • Thomas Noll (Escola Superior de Música de Catalunya)
  • Vasilis Kallis (University of Nicosia)

 

World of Bob Dylan

Overview

In 2016, the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa jointly announced the acquisition of the Bob Dylan Archive–an extraordinary collection of material that includes over 6,000 items, including recordings, manuscripts, film, notebooks and much more.  These materials have already begun to open up new ways of understanding not just Dylan and his work, but the broader history of popular music both in America and around the world.  Tulsa is already home to the Woody Guthrie Center and will soon welcome OKPOP, which will house collections related to Leon Russell, Wanda Jackson, Roy Clark, Bob Wills, and more.  The Bob Dylan Archive will thus rest at the center of a rich array of resources focused on twentieth-century popular music of all kinds.

To help advance this work, the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies, in cooperation with the Bob Dylan Archive, Gilcrease Museum, and the departments of English, Art, Music, and History, will host an international symposium on the Nobel Laureate from May 30 to June 2, 2019.  We aim to bring together scholars, critics, performers, collectors, and fans in order to help mark the arrival of the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa and continue the already lively inquiry into one of the world’s most innovative and influential artists.  The organizing committee now seeks proposals for papers, panels, and roundtable discussions on all aspects of Dylan’s work, context, influences, and legacy.

Rather than trying to work around a single theme, this symposium welcomes proposals on any topic related to Dylan’s music, art, life, and context.  We particularly encourage interdisciplinary proposals that work across fields such as literature, music, history, sociology, art, media studies, and biography.  We also welcome and encourage work in a variety of different formats including digital and artistic projects.  Keynote events will include a deep dive into the Archive’s treasures, discussions with musicians who toured with Dylan, and lectures by leading music writers and scholars.

Individual Proposals

The organizing committee welcomes proposals for 15 to 20-minutes papers and presentations.  To submit, please send a title, a 250-word abstract that summarizes the topic and complete contact information (name, email, and any institutional affiliation). The organizers will group these papers into panels.

Panel Proposals

Panels consist of three or four speakers focused on a common topic or idea.  To submit a panel proposal, the chair should send a 500-word abstract that includes a name for the session as well as presentation titles for each participant.  The chair and each proposed panelist should provide an email address and any institutional affiliation.

Roundtable Proposals

These special sessions are meant to encourage conversation, debate, and the exchange of ideas around broadly compelling topics (e.g. Cover Songs or Teaching Dylan).  Roundtables should be proposed by a single moderator and and may include up to five participants.  The focus should be on conversation among the panelists and the audience rather than on the delivery of prepared remarks.  Roundtable proposals should include 250-word summaries of the topic to be explored along with the names and email addresses of the chair and each participant.

Deadlines:

Sept 1               Submission Portal Opens

Jan 15              Paper, Panel, and Roundtable Submission Deadline

Feb 1                Registration Opens

Feb 15              Notification

For updates, please visit our website at: https://dylan.utulsa.edu/world-bob-dylan-symposium/

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/142550896607959/

 

Towards Best Practice: Teaching Singing in Higher Education – Core competencies

Saturday 22nd September 2018 The London College of Music hosts a one day conference with top researchers and voice practitioners Dr Gillyanne Kayes, Janice Chapman, Prof. Johan Sundberg, Tori Burnay, Dr Susan Yarnall, Dr Denise Borland and Ali Bell.

The day will be relevant to teachers of all genres especially those working in higher education or preparing students to enter HE including Musical Directors. Researchers and students of singing teaching will also benefit by way of poster submissions with a prize awarded by Compton Publishing (see below for details).

Topics covered include being a singing teacher, examining the current model, myths and misconceptions, acoustics, rehabilitation, the psychology of one-to-one teaching, new developments in France, and a round table discussion. Light refreshments and a buffet lunch provided. The BAPAM voice care initiative

Delegate fee £50 (including lunch and refreshments).

To book a place go to http://www.lcme.uwl.ac.uk/events

Posters up to A2 to be submitted along with conference booking fee by Monday September 10th

For more information http://www.lcme.uwl.ac.uk/events

CALL FOR POSTERS

Deadline: extended to noon on 17th August 2018

The Programme Committee welcomes proposals for individual posters, in any areas of scholarship related to teaching singing and pedagogic practice in Higher Education.

The following non-exhaustive list indicates some of the intended themes of the conference:

  • Teaching models
  • Psychology of Teaching
  • Voice Care
  • Vocal acoustics
  • Pedagogic Practice

Proposals of no more than 300 words should be sent as a Word attachment (including details of author(s), affiliations (University, Conservatoire/College, Orchestra, Chamber Ensemble etc.), contact details etc.), to ivor.flint@uwl.ac.uk to arrive before the deadline of noon on 16th July 2018. Proposals will be reviewed anonymously, so please submit a second version of your proposal with all names and institutional affiliations removed.

The Conference Committee, will respond to authors by Wednesday 22nd August.

Eighth Annual Meeting | Il Gusto Italiano: Italian Style and Transalpine Exchanges in Early Keyboard Music

May 13–15, 2019
Sam Houston State University School of Music, Huntsville, Texas, U.S.A.

Call for Proposals

Admired, imitated, and heatedly debated, the concept of Italian style and taste plays an essential role in the history of keyboard music. The Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) dedicates its eighth annual meeting to all aspects of Italian style and its international reception throughout the centuries, including—but not limited to—composition and improvisation, music theory and basso continuo, instrument making, pedagogy, and temperaments. Hosted by the Center for Early Music Research and Performance (CEMRAP) at the Sam Houston State University School of Music (Huntsville, Texas), three days of events (Monday through Wednesday, May 13– 15, 2019) will include paper presentations, lecture-recitals, and mini-recitals, evening concerts, and an exhibition of publications, recordings, and instrument makers’ work. A limited number of presentations and sessions on historical keyboard topics that are not directly related to the theme of the conference, will be considered. Please submit all proposals through the following electronic submission forms:

Paper Presentation: https://goo.gl/forms/iD9QXXJ3L47e3P9W2
Lecture Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/Fr4Dn5ZUnkit4L9j1
Mini Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/ApvdZBseV8OplEEg2
Themed Session: https://goo.gl/forms/D0s7bErhvM26zp8V2

The submission deadline is EXTENDED TO NOVEMBER 5, 2018. Presentations of all formats are limited to 25 minutes. Paper and lecture-recital proposals require an abstract of no more than 2,500 characters. For mini-recitals, submit complete program information and provide links to up to two representative recordings pertaining to the proposal. Performers not intending to bring their own instruments or to make arrangements to use exhibitors’ instruments may perform on the instruments listed below. All proposals must include a short biographical statement (no more than 1,500 characters) for all presenters.

Notification of accepted proposals will be made by November 15, 2018. Presenters must be members of HKSNA and must register for the conference. Presenters must also cover their own travel and other expenses. Further information, as it becomes available, will be posted on the society’s website http://www.historicalkeyboardsociety.org.

HKSNA 2019 also welcomes exhibitors to showcase their instruments, products, and services in the conference. Furthermore, instrument makers are invited to submit proposals for maintenance workshops, etc. Please direct inquiries and proposals to hksna2019@gmail.com.

Available Instruments
Harpsichords
Flemish Single by Gerald Self, GGAA to d3, 8’8’, lute stop, 415/440 Hz, delrin plectra.
Flemish Double after Couchet by Joel Katzman, GGAA to e3, 8’8’4’, 415/440 Hz, quill plectra.
Italian Single after Celestini by Joel Katzman, GGBB to d3, 8’8’, 392/415/440 Hz, strung in brass, quill plectra.

Fortepiano
Paul McNulty after Walter & Son c. 1804, FF to c4, 430 Hz, knee levers for moderator (left) and dampers (right).

Organ
Italian “organo di legno” (all pipes cypress wood), Giovanni Pradella after 17th-century models, C–d3 chromatic, 440 Hz, 1/4 comma meantone. Disposition: Principale 8’, Ottava 4’, Decimaquinta 2’, Flauto stoppo 8’, Flauto in ottava 4’, Fiffaro (voce umana) 8’ (treble).

Program Committee
Mario Aschauer, chair, Sam Houston State University
David Kelzenberg, HKSNA president
Carol lei Breckenridge, HKSNA vice-president
Sonia Lee, HKSNA immediate past president
Maria Luisa Baldassari, Conservatorio Rossini Pesaro
Massimiliano Guido, Università degli studi di Pavia

Connections and Communication in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching

The University of York Music Department is delighted to host its second Music Education conference: 

‘Connections and Communication in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching’.

This event will bring together teachers, researchers, and performers to explore connections and communication in instrumental and vocal music teaching. This topic can be approached in numerous ways and we welcome submissions from students and professionals who have related views and experience. There will be a balance of practical and theoretical submissions across the two days and we are keen to support early career professionals as well as students, independent scholars and music teachers.

The conference will take place on Tuesday 26th June and Wednesday 27th June 2018 in The Rymer Auditorium at the University of York (see travel information page for further details on the venue and access).

The event is organised by staff and students on the MA in Music Education: Instrumental and Vocal Teaching, at the University of York.


Call for Papers

Please send your proposal to mecy-18@york.ac.uk  by 18.00 on 16th May 2018.

The conference topic is intentionally broad to encourage submissions from a range of perspectives. To facilitate this, four session types will be considered: 20-minute spoken presentations, poster presentations, 40-minute practical sessions, and 60-minute ‘diverse format’ sessions.

For information on submission guidelines go to our website.


For further information please contact:

FAO: Dr. E Haddon

Music Department,
University of York,
Heslington,
York YO10 5DD,

email: mecy-18@york.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1904 324564,