Congress on Sound, Music and Musical Instruments

DATE: 2-3-4 of October 2020
INFORMATION: https://congressorganimusic.wixsite.com/co2020oc

THEME: The general theme chosen for this year is: “SOUND GENERATION: environment and music in generations of sound creation”, with all papers related to organological and sound matters being highly welcome. 
WHERE: Castelo Branco – central Portugal
LIMIT DATE FOR PROPOSALS: 15 September

Dear all,
we are pleased to be able to organise the ANIMUSIC Congress in 2020, in spite of the known issues we all have been facing during this year.
In the region chosen to hold our congress, there has hardly been any case of covid-19. Besides many good reasons, of which having a low population density is one of them, the air is not polluted, there is no traffic nor confusion on the streets, life quality is known to be very high. There are mountains, forests, ecological farms, self-sustainable agricultural systems (like ours in the headquarters of ANIMUSIC: Quinta da Lira), pure crystalline water fountains and rivers, with beautiful river-pools or beaches and lakes where we all go swim (water we can drink !). Besides these natural healthy conditions, in Portugal people respect the general governmental health policies, wearing masks in public closed places, keeping distance, different “in” and “out” paths, and limiting the number of people in social gatherings. Here, in Castelo Branco, the hospital created a detached alley for treating contaminated patients, fearing a full epidemic everywhere, which did not happen – in fact, the very few isolated cases  from visitors to the region were immediately taken care of, and either submitted to home-isolation or transported to specialised institutions. Cases of death “with” virus (not “from” the virus) were minimal: the serious problematic cases were from other diseases.
We are sorry to have heard of worrying publicity regarding Portugal – which led to the creation of travel limitations or quarantine obligations which were not realistic. These last bans, and the earlier general European cancellation of public events, provoked serious limitations to the organization of concerts, conferences or other initiatives, and we all know the damage it caused to the artistic world (and many other worlds), and consequently to musical instruments technicians and all related professionals. We try to go forward with positivism.
We are preparing our event with all precautions: part of the presentations or concerts will be in a large hall, with people respecting the imposed law regulations (sitting distance, masks, provision of disinfectant liquids, special hygienisation of the spaces, etc.), and part of the presentations, weather allowing, will be in open gardens.
We have sent to private contacts a first Call for Papers, to have an idea of the response of potential participants. We are happy to have had a number of proposals which allow us to set up the conference with a good core of participants.
We have thus decided to make a full public Call for Papers, waiting for a while before doing it, having been observing the evolution of the ‘epidemic’ and the various governmental decisions, and so proposing the deadline to the 15th of September. If you are interested in physically participating, please send your proposal asap, so we have a full notion of the program possibilities (we try to have various recitals, in different spaces, to allow visitors to enjoy the different marvels of each place – palaces, parks, castles, etc.). We are also planning a complimentary tour in the region, with a visit to a special historical organ in a village with difficult access. And, as usual, a wonderful delicious banquet.
Please read more about the Call for Papers, transportation, and other information, at the website created for this Congress: link.


Welcome to ANIMUSIC-Portugal.
With warm good wishes,

Patricia Bastos

ANIMUSIC team


Interrogating sources: Prokofiev, words and music

https://crulh.univ-lorraine.fr/content/crulh-appel-communication

Call for papers
  • CFP deadline: August 31, 2020
  • Conference dates: December 11–12, 2020
  • Location: Metz, France

Prokofiev scholarship underwent a significant transformation in 2013 primarily through the consolidation of archival materials hosted at the Serge Prokofiev Archive at Columbia University. A first symposium to recognise this important moment was organized at Columbia University in April 2017. A partnership between Columbia and the University of Lorraine was instigated with a view to further developing and exploring these research materials and scholarship trends. Following on from a recent series of landmark publications on Prokofiev and his music (notably Morrison, Seinen, Asaro, Guillaumier, McAllister), this colloquium aims to continue its interrogation of primary sources and personal documents.

Prokofiev travelled extensively, lived in several countries, explored several continents, and interacted with an incredible number of his contemporaries – musicians, writers, chess players, publishers, poets, painters, journalists – the list is a long one. Prokofiev, himself very inspired by literature, left several autobiographical works but also little studied stories and short stories. Due to the unique nature of his geographical and artistic background, the question of the multiplicity of cultural, political and artistic contexts over which he may have had an influence or been influenced by, is particularly relevant since it has left a trace on the sources that have come to us today. The multiplicity of genres that Prokofiev worked with throughout his career, from chamber music to film music, from concert pieces to children’s stories, from operas to incidental music, from ballet to Romances, has generated an incredible number of diverse sources, preserved in multiple places. This symposium is intended to provide an interdisciplinary opportunity to deepen current research into these sources and to stimulate new perspectives.

Scientific Committee
Natalia Ermolaev, Columbia University
Christina Guillaumier, Royal College of Music
Laetitia Le Guay, Université de Cergy-Pontoise
Nicolas Moron, Université de Lorraine
Natalia Savkina, Conservatoire Tchaïkovsky de Moscou

Keynote speakers
Rita McAllister, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
Simon Morrison, Princeton University

Re-envisaging Music: Listening in the Visual Age

Siena – Accademia Musicale Chigiana
10-12 December 2020

Keynote Speaker Prof. Leslie Korrick
(School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, York University, Toronto):
“Listening in the Age of Sound Art”

Music and images, seeing and hearing have always been inextricably linked. Even when more autonomous concepts of music developed at various times through the centuries, they arguably served to keep at bay the ever-present visual dimensions of the act of listening. When we listen to music, do we just listen? When we see a painting, or anything else, do we just watch?

The last few decades, however, have witnessed the advent of an ever more pervasive visuality. From the development of technology to social media to special effects, seeing is foregrounded like never before. What does this mean for music? How do music’s materialities answer to the materialities of visual objects and arts? How does music answer to the demands of pictures? Do these new developments affect our listening and performance experiences? What categories are particularly useful to explain the connections between musical and visual domains? How are different musical traditions, from “classical” music and opera to jazz, popular and folk music being re- envisaged?

Possible topics for consideration include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • live performance
  • site-specific performance
  • installations/sound art
  • video performance
  • live broadcasting
  • pre-existing music as soundtrack
  • historically informed listening
  • places/spaces for performance
  • urban musicology

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

A selection of the conference papers will be published in the 2021 volume of Chigiana. Journal of Musicological Studies (https://journal.chigiana.org/).

Please send proposal to chigiana.journal@chigiana.org  by 25 June 2020.

Proposals should include:
– Title of paper
– Name of speaker(s)
– Institutional affiliation
– An abstract of c. 300 words

The papers should not exceed 30 minutes in duration.

Conference Committee: Antonio Cascelli, Tim Carter, Laura Leante, Allan Moore, Christopher Morris, Emanuele Senici

Organizing Committee: Nicola Sani, Stefano Jacoviello, Susanna Pasticci

The conference is organized within the 2020 Chigiana Project, Reshaping the Traditions. The project aims to explore the impact of the concepts of tradition in contemporary music culture, combining educational opportunities, music production and scientific research.

We are aware that there are still uncertainties in the current scenario; we will constantly monitor the situation and the measures that the Italian and other governments put in place and we hope that by December 2020 it will be possible to travel, so that the conference may go ahead as planned and we can meet in Siena. However, if necessary, we will be running the conference online.

Narrating Musicology: Reviewing the History/Histories of Musicology

Institute of Musicology, University of Bern, October 1st – 4th 2020

In November 1996, a musicological colloquium was held at University of Bern under the title Musikwissenschaft – eine verspätete Disziplin? (‘Musicology – a Delayed Discipline?’). The discussions and outcomes that took place were then published four years later in an anthology of the same title, edited by Anselm Gerhard. The aim of both the conference and the publication was to focus less on specific key people or institutions, and instead foreground general tendencies within the history of musicology: from its beginning in the late 19th century until the time of publication and with a scope also beyond the German-speaking world. Even if relatively late, this approach proved essential for considering the history of the musicological discipline as an object of study in itself.
More than twenty years later, and in light of the upcoming 100 years’ anniversary of the Institute of Musicology, Bern, which will take place in 2021, we now take the opportunity to once again reflect on these issues:
– What is the current state of the history of musicology as a discipline?
– How has the reflection on musicology changed current research as well as teaching contents?
– Can musicology still be understood as a “delayed discipline”?
Traditionally, musicology has been divided into three strands: historical musicology, systematic musicology and ethnomusicology. Additionally, related subjects – such as music theory and music pedagogy – have had an important impact on current research on the history of the discipline. The result of this, however, is that multiple and at times even isolated histories of musicology have developed. This conference focuses on these various narratives and aims at encouraging an inter- as well as intra-disciplinary dialogue.
The Bernese colloquium twenty years ago focused on the field of tension in musicology “between belief in progress and rejection of modernity”. The discrepancy between international orientation and national chauvinist tendencies, which were both present in the 1990s, were also addressed. The present conference asks, however, is this still the case today? It further queries whether the disclosure of the various narratives, as well as the culturally specific contradictions within the various sub-disciplines have changed the self-perception of musicology as a whole. How important are national factors in shaping the principal focus of the discipline’s history nowadays? This conference focuses on the various narratives that have evolved within our field and questions the motivations which have led to these various regional histories. Therefore, the focus shall be extended beyond Western academic perspectives to a more global, and thus multifaceted approach.
Another important aspect of this conference is the question of why we should study the history of our discipline at all.
– What kind of interaction is at play when on the one hand we focus on disciplinary self-reflection and on the other, on our objects of study?
– What are the objects of study of the history of academic disciplines?
–  On the topic of musicology’s protagonists: who is responsible for narrating the histories of musicology?
–  Is the historiography of disciplines an area of study where methodological and content-related interpretation can be applied?
– How much power do various institutions have in shaping and constructing the narratives surrounding musicology?
–  What roles do these narratives play in shaping the identities of scientists, institutions and various schools of thought?
– How can musicologists deal with the history of musicology in the digital age?
The conference aims to provide a platform where discussions can happen across different generations and between the various sub-disciplines of musicology, music theory and music pedagogy.
The conference’s core-topics are:
– Reflections on the various histories within musicology (regional, national and international, as well as inter- and intra-disciplinary practice)
– The interaction between musicology’s self-reflexion and our objects of study (protagonists, methods, institutions, the digital age)
We invite you to send your proposals (max. 300 words) for one of the following categories: individual papers (20 minutes plus 10 minutes of discussion);  Panels (3 related papers of 1.5 hours in total); Poster presentations;  Roundtables (4 shorter presentations of 15 minutes each plus a chaired discussion; 2 hours in total); Presentation of films, audio or other media.
Please submit your abstracts to narratingmusicology@musik.unibe.ch by the 16th of February 2020. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously and should therefore not contain the names of the authors. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of March 2020.
Further information:
www.narratingmusicology.home.blog

Music and Change Before and After 1990

Baltic Musicological Conference 2020

MUSIC AND CHANGE BEFORE AND AFTER 1990

Vilnius, 10–12 September 2020

CALL for papers to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020

  • Organized by the Department of Music History at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, the Lithuanian-Polish research project “Music of Change: Expression of Liberation in Polish and Lithuanian Music Before and After 1989” and the Musicological Section of the Lithuanian Composers’ Union

The employment of music as a form of cultural opposition and transformative power is a multifunctional process that implies an extension of the thematic and disciplinary borders to the complex relations of the music’s cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts. However, such approach requires to provide a space for deep engagements in music and its various worlds overcoming a simplified understanding of musical practices as a reflection of social structures and political processes. As Jacques Attali writes on the relationship between music and societal structures, music “makes audible the new world that will gradually become visible, that will impose itself and regulate the order of things; it is not only the image of things, but the transcending of the everyday, the herald of the future” (Attali 1985).

Baltic Singing Revolution – “revolution by singing and smiling” (Heinz Valk 1988) – is a widely known example of the public expressive cultural practice which had a stimulating effect on cultural imagination and political change. Remembering the year 1990, so important but not limited to national histories of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, the Baltic musicological conference 2020 aims to acquire new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the ways in which the musical expression of liberation and musicians’ networks contributed to political and cultural change before and after the end of the Cold War. In what ways the musical practices contributed to formation, negotiation and transformation of sociocultural identities and changing collectivities? What has been the relationship between the processes of cultural and political change before and after 1990? What were prominent ideas, landmark cultural texts and influential individuals who have had a formative and transformative power in these processes? To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the 20th–21st-century music and change in the widest sense, we invite the proposals for the Baltic musicological conference 2020, to be held at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre in Vilnius 10–12 September 2020. The conference will include international guest speakers Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Gintautas Mažeikis (Vytautas Magnus University) and Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University).

Academic committee

Małgorzata Janicka-Słysz (Academy of Music in Kraków), Kevin C. Karnes (Emory University), Olga Manulkina (St Petersburg State University), Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli (Lithuanian Composers’ Union), Rima Povilionienė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre), Peter J. Schmelz (Arizona State University), Iwona Sowińska-Fruhtrunk (Academy of Music in Kraków), Rūta Stanevičiūtė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre)

Local organizing committee

Zita Abramavičiūtė, Ingrida Jasonienė, Lina Navickaitė-Martinelli, Rima Povilionienė (vice-chair), Rima Rimšaitė, Rūta Stanevičiūtė (chair), Judita Žukienė

Submission

The conference language is English. There will be two options: individual papers and panels (of 3 or 4 presenters).

  • Papers: We invite abstracts of no longer than 300 words, including keywords and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.
  • Panels: The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (300 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. 

Please submit proposals as a doc/odt/rtf attachment to balticconference2020@lmta.lt by 15 March 2020. The following format should be used:

  • Name, affiliation and contact email address
  • Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper)
  • Title of presentation
  • Abstract (300 words maximum; in the case of panels, include a general abstract followed by individual abstracts, in total 1200 words maximum)
  • Keywords (5 maximum)
  • References (optional, 10 maximum)
  • CV (100 words maximum; in case of panels, CVs of all participants)

Accepted speakers will be informed by mid-April 2020.

The conference registration fee both for Oral Presenters and Non-Presenters/Listeners – 30 EUR, student registration fee – 15 EUR, onsite payment.

The fee includes attendance to the conference sessions, conference material, coffee breaks and conference reception, social program events.

Information about registration and accommodation will be sent after acceptance of proposals.

The selected papers will be invited for publication in the international peer-reviewed scientific journal “Lithuanian Musicology” (indexed in SCOPUS, EBSCO, RILM).

The conference organizers look forward to receiving your submissions!

More info:

Prof. Dr. Rima Povilionienė

balticconference2020@lmta.lt

Musicology and Its Future in Times of Crises

Musicology and Its Future in Times of Crises

International Conference on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Department of Musicology, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb

Zagreb, 27-28 November 2020 – deadline extension: 20 March 2020

Narratives of crisis seem to be a persistent condition of every generation’s history. Aside from their presence in everyday life and the fact that they are ingrained in the social and political sphere, discourses on crisis have become an inextricable feature of contemporary scholarship itself, perceivable in debates on the crisis of knowledge, reflections on the devaluation of the humanities, and discussions on the changing conditions of academic labour. Coupled with growing anxieties about the precarious position of musicological disciplines within the neoliberal university and larger systems of scholarship, these discourses condition the environment in which musicological research is conducted in an important way, bear upon the ways knowledge is (re)produced, and inevitably (although not always perceptibly) shape disciplinary futures.

Scholars across the field of music studies are invited to reflect on and address the issues proposed in the three thematic streams outlined below, as well as to contribute to the broader topic of the conference by sharing insights and reflections gained through their experience and research. We invite proposals for individual or co-authored paper presentations and/or themed panels.

STREAMS:

1. Reflecting on the Crisis of Musicological Knowledge

2. Responding to the Crisis of (Ir)Relevance

3. Resisting the Crisis of Academic Labour

4. Related research

1. Reflecting on the Crisis of Musicological Knowledge

At the level of musicological knowledge, the crisis manifests itself in the permanent doubts regarding the foundations of musicology and consequently in the vivid proliferation of disciplinary “turns”. In the moment of crisis, existing musicological knowledge is considered to be untenable and the limitations of its premises become evident. In such cases epistemology speaks of “paradigm changes”, which reveals as much as it hides about what is actually at stake. But what is going on in such

moments of crisis of musicological knowledge? Do paradigm changes in musicology imply a certain automatism? Do they occur consensually? Do they proceed without any resistance?

The first thematic stream could therefore focus on the following questions: Who has the right to announce the untenability of certain musicological knowledge? Is one obliged to follow such announcements? Does that right depend on the centrality or marginality of the position from which one speaks? How does such positioning define the relations between different national traditions of the discipline and between different subdisciplines within music studies? Are paradigm changes something that could be put into a programme or a manifesto (announcing a certain “musicology of the future” as the future of musicology)? Could the crisis of musicological knowledge be solved by importing perspectives from another discipline? Why do research paradigms change from time to time in certain settings, whereas in others they seem to be resilient to change? How do musicological paradigms age? Could the once outdated paradigms have any future?

2. Responding to the Crisis of (Ir)Relevance

The idea behind this thematic stream is to bring forward issues and modes of responding to crises within and outside of academia, with the tools of musicological scholarly knowledge. How could we today – more than twenty-five years after Philip Bohlman’s (1993) call – conceive of musicology as a political act? Although this question resonated across different musicological subfields, there is still room to consider whether subdisciplinary divisions helped or aggravated musicology’s relevance and visibility as well as its social responsibility.

Some of the questions that could be considered within this stream are: In the light of humanitarian emergencies, how can musicological epistemology help humanity and is there still room for academic activism? What is the role of musicology in the age of postmodern crisis of knowledge and post-truth – how can the discipline cope with the challenges and what is its responsibility within this context? In the current cultural and educational policies, where humanities are increasingly being pushed aside by market-oriented sciences, what are the arguments in favour of the discipline’s relevance, and how can musicology help in restoring the social awareness of the importance of humanities? No less important, who are musicology’s audiences today and what is the future of the discipline and its subfields within these contexts?

3. Resisting the Crisis of Academic Labour

It seemingly goes without saying that the labour of practicing, developing, and (re)imagining musicology rests almost exclusively on the shoulders of the scholars themselves. The issues of the complex intricacies of academic labour in musicology, nevertheless, still belong to one of the least-researched and only occasionally discussed topics in the discipline itself. Through this thematic stream, we encourage scholars to reflect on the changing conditions of academic labour in a historical perspective as well as contemporary institutional practices and offer their perception on the myriad ways organisational governance, the extensification/intensification of work and individual(ized) responses to structural transformations of workplace affect the sustainability and future of musicological disciplines.

Some of the following questions are aimed at opening the space for further discussion within this stream: How do the structural features of contemporary universities and other academic institutions affect our everyday experiences of research and teaching? How and why do the individual (gendered, classed, racialized etc.) experiences of academics seem to escape our critical attention? How does the increasing scarcity (luxury?) of time dedicated solely to (funded?) research affect the development of the discipline of musicology? How do contemporary pressures of competitiveness and dictate of “measurable” excellence stand in relation to mutual support and solidarity among scholars? What does the exclusive reliance on short- term project-based market-oriented funding bring to the survival of smaller disciplines and the precariousness of academic labour in them? What is the (emotional, mental, corporeal, existential) cost of work (not) being done (Gill 2010)?

4. Related Research

Beside the above outlined thematic streams, we welcome research-based contributions to other aspects of the broader symposium topic of musicology and its future.

Keynote Speaker

Nicholas Cook, University of Cambridge

Conference language: English

Conference website:

http://www.muza.unizg.hr/zgmusicology50/en/category/conference/

Guidelines for proposal submission:

• individual or co-authored papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes discussion):

  • title and abstracts of up to 300 words, up to 6 keywords

themed panel sessions of three or four individual papers (60 minutes + 15 minutes discussion)

  • title and abstracts of up to 300 words per paper
  • panel title, and up to 300 words outlining the general theme of the panel, up to 6 keywords

Due Date and Submission

Costs

The costs of travel and accommodation will be covered by participants. The registration fee is €50 (€30 for PhD students). It covers the costs of conference materials, coffee breaks and refreshments as well as the conference reception.

Venue

The symposium will be held at the Academy of Music in Zagreb, Trg Republike Hrvatske 12, 10000 Zagreb

Program Committee

  • Ivan Ćurković (chair), Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Samuel Araujo, School of Music, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)
  • Zdravko Blažeković, Graduate Center of the City University, New York
  • Hana Breko Kustura, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Zagreb
  • Ana Čizmić Grbić, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Naila Ceribašić, Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research, Zagreb
  • Dalibor Davidović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Monika Jurić Janjik, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Vjera Katalinić, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Zagreb
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Mojca Piškor, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Ingrid Pustijanac, Department of Musicology and Cultural Heritage, University of Pavia
  • Cornelia Szabó-Knotik, Institute for Musicology and Performance Studies, University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna
  • Jelka Vukobratović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb

Local Arrangements Committee

  • Ivan Ćurković (chair), Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Ana Čizmić Grbić, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Dalibor Davidović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Monika Jurić Janjik, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Mojca Piškor, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb
  • Jelka Vukobratović, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb

Responses in Music to Climate Change

The Barry S. Brook Center for Music Research and Documentation at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York announces the multidisciplinary international conference

Responses in Music to Climate Change

to be held at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, 21–23 April 2020

The deleterious effects of anthropogenic climate change continue to shape music making in a post-industrial, global society. Indigenous communities—those typically least responsible for the carbon emissions that have contributed to global warming—face the elimination or depletion of natural resources necessary for their musical practices and traditions. Composers of art music, many compelled to bear witness to our current times and bring awareness to threatened ecosystems, draw sound material from endangered environmental sources. Popular music, too, continues to respond through concerts, songs that thematize the environment, and celebrity endorsements for protection measures. Across all forms of music making, discourses of preservation, sustainability, visibility, and action are pervasive.

With the aim of collecting and sharing research on music’s place within the context of anthropogenic climate change, this conference welcomes contributions from a broad range of disciplines. A multidisciplinary approach not only seeks to capitalize on the wide range of ontological frameworks that each field brings, but also foregrounds the necessity for clear communication and criticism within and between disciplines. Increasingly, studies that address climate change and notions of environment point to the limitations of common categories for sound and music. As the problem is a human one, we hope to tackle the perennial question of how to develop vocabularies that transcend the boundaries of specialized jargon. Simply put, to confront a shared problem, we must develop strategies and techniques that address its complexities in a language accessible to all. A precondition for inciting and facilitating action is the widespread comprehension of the stakes, difficulties, and necessities as a global community.

We are excited to have Dr. Ana María Ochoa Gautier, Department of Music/Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University, as our keynote speaker.

We seek to inspire papers and panels on the following themes:

  • Music and acoustic ecology
  • Environmental sound sources in composition
  • The sounds of endangered lands
  • Sustainability
  • Perspectives on sonic environments
  • Music and globalization/industrialization
  • Sonic ecologies
  • Politics
  • Sound studies

Please submit a proposal, with title and an abstract of no more than 300 words, and include contact information (address, phone, and email). Proposals for papers, whole panels, posters, and lecture-recitals are welcome.

Proposals may be submitted before January 13, 2020 to:

Michael Lupo

The Barry S. Brook Center for Music Research and Documentation

The City University of New York, The Graduate Center

365 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY 10016-4309

mlupo@gradcenter.cuny.edu

Further information will be posted at https://brookcenter.gc.cuny.edu

1st Biennial Carl Nielsen Studies Conference

***The dates of this conference have changed***

Newcastle University, 17–18 September 2021

The 1st Biennial Carl Nielsen Studies Conference will be held at Newcastle University. As Denmark’s most important musical figure, the conference celebrates Nielsen’s life and output. The event is jointly organised by the research project ‘Carl Nielsen – European Composer’ at the University of Copenhagen and the editorial board of the Anglo-Danish journal Carl Nielsen Studies

The organising committee is pleased to announce that Professor Michael Fjeldsøe (Copenhagen University) will be the Keynote Speaker.

The CfP is now closed and we have received proposals from postgraduate students, early career scholars and established academics. Topics for research papers include:

  • Theory and analysis
  • Historical and contextual research
  • Philosophical and/or political approaches
  • Biography
  • Nielsen’s literary output
  • Influences inside and outside of Denmark
  • Reception
  • Iconography
  • Archival research
  • Performance practice

The language of the conference will be English.

The conference follows directly from the RMA Annual Conference 2021, also hosted by Newcastle University: https://conferences.ncl.ac.uk/rma2021/

Organising Committee:

  • Dr Christopher Tarrant (Chair, Newcastle University)
  • Professor Michael Fjeldsøe (University of Copenhagen)
  • Professor David Fanning (University of Manchester)
  • Professor Daniel M. Grimley (University of Oxford)
  • Dr Michelle Assay (University of Huddersfield)
  • Carmela Barbaro (Conference Assistant, Newcastle University)

The conference will take place in the Robert Boyle Lecture Theatre at Newcastle University. The University is situated in Newcastle upon Tyne in the North-East of England. It is easily accessible by road, rail, and air, and the local Metro network provides convenient connections between the University, the central railway station, and Newcastle Airport. There will be a conference dinner at a local restaurant on Saturday, March 27, and this will also offer a chance to see some of the city’s impressive sights including its beautiful neoclassical architectural centre and the famous bridges over the River Tyne. At 55 degrees north, Newcastle is approximately equal in latitude to Copenhagen.

3rd AEMC Conference on Music, Communication and Performance

27th to 28th June 2020

ONLINE EDITION, Italy

Website: http://nonesal.wixsite.com/conference
Contact person: Alberto Nones, PhD

The conference, converted to an online conference due to the coronavirus pandemic, promotes interdisciplinary research and original approaches in any field of musicology, sociology, philosophy, literature, etc., and in any field of artistic performance that involves music. You are invited to apply with papers or performance proposals on any topic, but a special focus of this third edition will center on the question: Is Classical Music Dead? Kramer’s Inquiry Revisited.Keynote: Prof. Lawrence Kramer

Organized by: AEMC
Deadline for abstracts/proposals: 30th April 2020


[Original CFP follows]

Montecassiano, Italy, 27-28 June 2020

The Associazione Europea di Musica e Comunicazione (AEMC) organizes the 3rd Academic Conference on “Music, Communication and Performance”. The conference promotes interdisciplinary research and original approaches in any field of musicology, communication studies, philosophy, literature, and in any field of artistic performance that involves music. You are invited to apply with papers or performance proposals on any topic, but a special focus of this third edition will center on the question: Is Classical Music Dead? Kramer’s Inquiry Revisited.

Keynote speaker: Professor Lawrence Kramer

Conference organizer: Dr. Alberto Nones

The abstract submission deadline is 30 April 2020. A maximum of 25 participants will be admitted.

Abstracts of max 150 words, specifying the contribution of the paper/performance, must be sent to aemc.montecassiano@gmail.com.

All info: nonesal.wixsite.com/conference

Meeting for Sound and Musical Instruments CO2019OC

8th International Scientific Meeting for the Study of Sound and Musical Instruments

CONGRESSO DE ORGANOLOGIA 2019 ORGANOLOGICAL CONGRESS

Belmonte, east-central Portugal

20-22 September 2019

Instruments of culture and peace

Many complain about the backstage, or invasive, pollution of sound in daily lives, and solutions? Social anxiety is mirroring short and long term influences, notably from birth, or even pre-natal effects through a stressed mother (scientific trends differ, precisely for this reason, we give here an opportunity for discussion, acknowledging it as a vast and often neglected issue). Many refer to “how life in Nature” is so beautiful, where we can play music in a perfect ambiance, but can’t or aren’t moving a finger to do something about it. We are doing it. We are developing a project that not only deals with the essential creativity in the human being but also the setting up of biodiversity in a balanced environment, where one can be thyself. All who visit us feel well here – why? This subject matter is far more important than it seems at a first glance. There is too much ‘noise’ in most people’s lives, too many front page headlines, too many characters on stage, too many spotlights, and everybody talks about all at the same time… we can’t listen to each, we can’t think about each… we need ‘silence’, reflection, to listen to life and art. Why are so many people frustrated and often depressed? Why so much illness with such highly developed medical support? Among many factors, the “sound quantity and quality” in our lives is fundamental. And that of music in our psychological and social balance too.

And – how music and creativity in sound can help a society in crisis? Fight fights, promote peace? How to help a society to be more united and less fragile? Can we, with our work, do better – and be part of the “positive productive” and not, as many do say, be the “useless” for the society? We are inviting you to discuss these and other prominent topics, which are intrinsically related to sound and musical instruments. Please come forward. In a society which is getting used to lightly give an opinion for anything and nothing in the social media, we invite those who “think” and – concretely “do something” – to visit, show, and think and do further.

From the morning of a bright Friday to an exquisite lunch on Sunday at the fabulous old Monastery, now a luxury hotel called Pousada de Belmonte, with concerts, recitals, activities, and full immersion Sessions, our program is quite promising. However, our special invitation to sociologists and musicologists had a good response in quality but not as wide, thematically, as we wanted it to be. There is still time, to make proposals and be part of this interesting gathering of people, who positively and openly discuss about the various issues that concern us all. We look forward to have more work presented that deals with the social impact of music and their musical tools, and studies about sound – for instance, how sound (acoustic and electronic) is affecting daily lives, our world.

You can have more information at the congress website, which is periodically updated: link [https://congressorganimusic.wixsite.com/co2019oc]

Or you can contact us directly: congressorg2019.animusic@gmail.com

Registration: besides the program (as listed above), it includes an active visit to an Exhibition of Musical Instruments (historical, traditional and technological), an unique bag with the program and materials, equipment and technical support, Wireless internet, coffee-breaks (nice and diversified), lunches (2), a banquet-lunch (gourmet), selected visits, reviewed publication (in the book series ‘Liranimus’, which contains essays on Organology, or online), certificate of participation, perhaps a memoir-gift, publishers, makers, restorers, and participants stalls, networking opportunities and, essentially, time reserved “on purpose” for constructive discussions and exchange of ideas. Note: group meals are optional.

All activities are open, namely recitals, concerts, demonstrations, workshops (within a registration limit), and visits. 

Registration fee

Early bird registration » 80€ for ANIMUSIC members (which has a symbolic registration fee of 20€, and no annual fees, no profit) / 110€ others (early bird registration until the 31st of August)

Regular » 120€ (ANIMUSIC) / 150€ (from 1st September)

Dayly fee » 40€ (does not include the banquet-lunch)

Banquet-lunch gourmet (for those friends accompanying, still a special price: 35€)

Other costs: Portugal is one of the less expensive countries in Europe. To give an idea, an expresso coffee costs about 0,70€ in a normal coffee-shop (it’s everywhere, this is the normal coffee, similar to Italia), or even less in automatic machines. Meals may be around 10€ (complete with wine, etc), including nice fresh grilled fish or vegetarian food. There are various options for lodging in Belmonte, you can check with the different available search engines or at Airbnb, averaging 70€ per night in a good hotel.

Transportation: You may use Porto’s or Lisboa’s international airports. From Porto, it is probably easier to rent a car, the rates, when booking from abroad, are quite low (you can have a car for 10€ a day or similar) and it’s basically all highway till Belmonte (if avoiding crossing Porto, you have: A4-A24-A25-A23; or crossing Porto: A29 or A1-A25-A23) which is very comfortable. The transportation from Lisboa is quite easy, also renting a car, or by public transportation: From the airport you take a taxi (5 to 8€)  or the metropolitan, to the Oriente station, which is near the River Tejo (beautiful place to visit if you have time, where the Oceanario is, plus other interesting sites). There, going up the stairs or lift, you check the line for Covilhã, usually trains are in time. If you pay online with anticipation (5, 8 or more days), you can even have a discount of up to 65%, if you are senior, it’s always 50%. The ticket to Covilhã, in the speed direct train, costs (as per today): 17,70€. Arriving in Covilhã, you can take a taxi (not expensive), a bus or meet with a group organised by us and the Municipality, on the 19th of September. If you have special needs, please contact us so that we arrange a special way for transportation. We work the best we can to help your experience be perfect and unique.

Portugal has been rated as the third safest country in the world, after Iceland and New Zealand. So, by visiting us, you shall discover more of this amazing country and meet fellows who are interested in your work, in discussing ideas and in moving forward. This is project Erdissol-ANIMUSIC.

For more information, visit us at this link. You are most welcome to contact us directly if you have questions (email).