Musica Scotica Annual Conference 2019

Musica Scotica logo

The Annual Conference of The Musica Scotica Trust will take place at the Tolbooth, Stirling on Friday May 3rd to Sunday May 5th 2019. The conference organisers welcome papers on all aspects of the music of Scotland and the Scottish diaspora. In 2019, as a particular theme, we will celebrate the 60th birthday of the composer James MacMillan, who will be present at the conference. The conference will also feature a performance of MacMillan’s music.

 

We invite submissions for:

individual papers (20 min. including any music examples)

lecture recitals (30 min.) (piano available)

themed sessions (1.5 hours in total)

panel or round-table discussions (1 hour)

poster presentations

 

We would particularly welcome papers on the music of James MacMillan any aspect of his compositional processes, or on Scottish influences on his music, such as pre-Reformation choral music, Robert Carver, Gaelic psalm-singing, pibroch, folk song, music in the Catholic Liturgy etc. As in previous years, we also welcome papers on any other aspect of music in or from Scotland, and of any genre. In line with the Trust’s aim of supporting and nurturing those engaged in early career research, we particularly encourage submissions from younger researchers.

 

Please send abstracts (max. 300 words), including a title, along with a short biography (max. 100 words) as an RTF, Pages or Word file to:

musicascotica@n-ism.org

Please also use this address for any queries.

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The closing date for receipt of proposal abstracts is Wednesday 31st October and acceptances will be notified by early December. We anticipate that the cost for the full conference will be in the region of £99 (£50 – concessions) with rates for half or single day participation available. Information on local accommodation will be available for participants.

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Towards Best Practice: Teaching Singing in Higher Education – Core competencies

Saturday 22nd September 2018 The London College of Music hosts a one day conference with top researchers and voice practitioners Dr Gillyanne Kayes, Janice Chapman, Prof. Johan Sundberg, Tori Burnay, Dr Susan Yarnall, Dr Denise Borland and Ali Bell.

The day will be relevant to teachers of all genres especially those working in higher education or preparing students to enter HE including Musical Directors. Researchers and students of singing teaching will also benefit by way of poster submissions with a prize awarded by Compton Publishing (see below for details).

Topics covered include being a singing teacher, examining the current model, myths and misconceptions, acoustics, rehabilitation, the psychology of one-to-one teaching, new developments in France, and a round table discussion. Light refreshments and a buffet lunch provided. The BAPAM voice care initiative

Delegate fee £50 (including lunch and refreshments).

To book a place go to http://www.lcme.uwl.ac.uk/events

Posters up to A2 to be submitted along with conference booking fee by Monday September 10th

For more information http://www.lcme.uwl.ac.uk/events

CALL FOR POSTERS

Deadline: noon on 16th July 2018

The Programme Committee welcomes proposals for individual posters, in any areas of scholarship related to teaching singing and pedagogic practice in Higher Education.

The following non-exhaustive list indicates some of the intended themes of the conference:

  • Teaching models
  • Psychology of Teaching
  • Voice Care
  • Vocal acoustics
  • Pedagogic Practice

Proposals of no more than 300 words should be sent as a Word attachment (including details of author(s), affiliations (University, Conservatoire/College, Orchestra, Chamber Ensemble etc.), contact details etc.), to ivor.flint@uwl.ac.uk to arrive before the deadline of noon on 16th July 2018. Proposals will be reviewed anonymously, so please submit a second version of your proposal with all names and institutional affiliations removed.

The Conference Committee, will respond to authors by Wednesday 18th July.

Eighth Annual Meeting | Il Gusto Italiano: Italian Style and Transalpine Exchanges in Early Keyboard Music

May 13–15, 2019
Sam Houston State University School of Music, Huntsville, Texas, U.S.A.

Call for Proposals

Admired, imitated, and heatedly debated, the concept of Italian style and taste plays an essential role in the history of keyboard music. The Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) dedicates its eighth annual meeting to all aspects of Italian style and its international reception throughout the centuries, including—but not limited to—composition and improvisation, music theory and basso continuo, instrument making, pedagogy, and temperaments. Hosted by the Center for Early Music Research and Performance (CEMRAP) at the Sam Houston State University School of Music (Huntsville, Texas), three days of events (Monday through Wednesday, May 13– 15, 2019) will include paper presentations, lecture-recitals, and mini-recitals, evening concerts, and an exhibition of publications, recordings, and instrument makers’ work. A limited number of presentations and sessions on historical keyboard topics that are not directly related to the theme of the conference, will be considered. Please submit all proposals through the following electronic submission forms:

Paper Presentation: https://goo.gl/forms/iD9QXXJ3L47e3P9W2
Lecture Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/Fr4Dn5ZUnkit4L9j1
Mini Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/ApvdZBseV8OplEEg2
Themed Session: https://goo.gl/forms/D0s7bErhvM26zp8V2

The deadline is October 15, 2018. Presentations of all formats are limited to 25 minutes. Paper and lecture-recital proposals require an abstract of no more than 2,500 characters. For mini-recitals, submit complete program information and provide links to up to two representative recordings pertaining to the proposal. Performers not intending to bring their own instruments or to make arrangements to use exhibitors’ instruments may perform on the instruments listed below. All proposals must include a short biographical statement (no more than 1,500 characters) for all presenters.

Notification of accepted proposals will be made by November 15, 2018. Presenters must be members of HKSNA and must register for the conference. Presenters must also cover their own travel and other expenses. Further information, as it becomes available, will be posted on the society’s website http://www.historicalkeyboardsociety.org.

HKSNA 2019 also welcomes exhibitors to showcase their instruments, products, and services in the conference. Furthermore, instrument makers are invited to submit proposals for maintenance workshops, etc. Please direct inquiries and proposals to hksna2019@gmail.com.

Available Instruments
Harpsichords
Flemish Single by Gerald Self, GGAA to d3, 8’8’, lute stop, 415/440 Hz, delrin plectra.
Flemish Double after Couchet by Joel Katzman, GGAA to e3, 8’8’4’, 415/440 Hz, quill plectra.
Italian Single after Celestini by Joel Katzman, GGBB to d3, 8’8’, 392/415/440 Hz, strung in brass, quill plectra.

Fortepiano
Paul McNulty after Walter & Son c. 1804, FF to c4, 430 Hz, knee levers for moderator (left) and dampers (right).

Organ
Italian “organo di legno” (all pipes cypress wood), Giovanni Pradella after 17th-century models, C–d3 chromatic, 440 Hz, 1/4 comma meantone. Disposition: Principale 8’, Ottava 4’, Decimaquinta 2’, Flauto stoppo 8’, Flauto in ottava 4’, Fiffaro (voce umana) 8’ (treble).

Program Committee
Mario Aschauer, chair, Sam Houston State University
David Kelzenberg, HKSNA president
Carol lei Breckenridge, HKSNA vice-president
Sonia Lee, HKSNA immediate past president
Maria Luisa Baldassari, Conservatorio Rossini Pesaro
Massimiliano Guido, Università degli studi di Pavia

Opera as Institution: Networks and Professions (1700–1914)

An international conference jointly organized by the Universities of Graz and Salzburg 

November 23–24 2018
Department of Musicology, University of Graz, Meerscheinschlössl, Mozartgasse 3, A-8010 Graz

Conference BoardDaniel Brandenburg (University of Salzburg), Cristina Scuderi (University of Graz), Michael Walter (University of Graz), Ingeborg Zechner (University of Graz)

The performance of opera as musical genre demands specific institutional surroundings in order to provide the means for scenic and musical representation. Indeed operatic history, ranging from its beginnings in seventeenth-century Venice to today’s globalized opera industry, is intimately bound to the history of institutions. This conference aims to gather internationally renowned musicologists whose research focuses on the institutional histories of European opera from the eighteenth to the end of the “long nineteenth century”. The intention of the conference is not to understand operatic institutions as locally distinct and isolated organizations, but rather perceive them as part of a transnational operatic network. The specific design of the conference enables to bring historical developments and shifts into account, and will lead to a deeper understanding of transnational operatic practices throughout the centuries. In addition, it will facilitate an international scholarly exchange on a complex and multifaceted topic in music history.

Conference papers will cover French, Italian, English and German operatic institutions in Europe from the eighteenth to the “long nineteenth century” and address topics such as:

  • Production systems of French, Italian, English and German opera
  • Political, legal, economic and sociocultural surroundings influencing the institution of the opera and its international exchange
  • Professions in the business of opera (composers, singers, agents, impresari, orchestra musicians, dancers, stage designers, librettists, …)
  • Networks of exchange between operatic institutions and their protagonists

 

Participation in the conference is free of charge. For passive conference participants no advance registration is required.

For further information on the program see the conference website: http://www.institutionopera.sbg.ac.at

EMR and the Church 

 

 

EMR and the Church 

The organising committee for The English Musical Renaissance and the Church and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies invite proposals for this one-day conference to be held at Durham University on the 5th November 2018.

We invite researchers to submit proposals engaging with perspectives on the relationship between composers associated with the English Musical Renaissance (EMR) and the church. PhD students are especially welcome to submit presentations. Proposals may address, but need not be limited to, the following topics:

  • EMR composers and hymnody
  • EMR composers and science, especially evolutionary thought
  • EMR composers, revealed and natural theologies
  • EMR composers and the liturgy
  • Analytical approaches to the church music of EMR composers
  • The church music of EMR composers and the long nineteenth century
  • EMR composers, and sacralisation of the secular
  • EMR composers, legacies today

Individual Proposal

Abstracts for a single speaker (20 minutes + 10 discussion) should be 350 words and clearly describe the argument, evidence, and research findings, and situate the work in relation to previous scholarship.

Panel Proposal

Abstracts for 3 speakers (1 hour) or 4 speakers (2 hours) should be 350 words and provide an outline of the main argument, evidence, and research findings of the panel, as well as situating the panel’s work in relation to previous scholarship and articulating how the research contributes to research into Victorian interdisciplinary. The panel organiser should also include an individual proposal abstract for each paper following the guidelines for Individual Proposals, along with each panelist’s contact information. Panel Proposals will be considered only as a whole, the session’s coherence being an essential part of the evaluation process.

Submission information

Please send your proposals as Word documents to cncs@durham.ac.uk no later than the 5th September 2018. The following format should be used:

  • Name, affiliation (if applicable) and contact details (postal address, email and phone)
  • Type of presentation (individual or panel)
  • Abstract title
  • Audio-visual and other requirements (the following are available: Data projector or large plasma screen; Desktop PC; VGA, HDMI and 3.5mm audio inputs; CD player; DVD player; Visualiser; Piano)
  • Brief biography (150 words)

Conference Website

The “Other” Voice: High Male Voices between Gluck and Rock

A Symposium of the International Gluck Opera Festival in Nuremberg, 5-7 July 2019

The international symposium, “The ‘Other’ Voice: High Male Voices between Gluck and Rock”, which will take place during the International Gluck Opera Festival in Nuremberg from 5-7 July 2019, seeks to address current research questions about the meaning, appropriation, aesthetic, and reception of high male voices in musical theater of the 18th century through to Pop and Rock.

Musical theater at the time of Christoph Willibald Gluck was shaped in large part by performing vocalists, which, particularly with the castrati in Italian opera seria, can be traced back to culturally conditioned aesthetic preferences for both high (male) voices and an ideal sonority (typical for the period), just as much to institutional factors, casting conventions, public expectations, and mechanisms of reception relating to voice, body, gender, and image.

That the object of fascination, the high male voice, is not limited to opera at the time of Gluck reveals corresponding trends in music of the 20th and 21st centuries, where high-range vocal parts for male performers are omnipresent—in theatrical and non-theatrical vocal genres alike. The casting of parts for countertenors, from Benjamin Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream to György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabreand Olga Neuwirth’s Bählamms Fest, continues to enjoy great popularity. It also represents important facets of musical theater up to the present day. Indeed, high male and falsetto voices are also of great musical and aesthetic importance in the realms of Pop (e.g., James Blunt, Justin Timberlake, A-ha, etc.) and Rock music (e.g., ACDC, Placebo, etc.). In certain instances, furthermore, the timbre generated by the falsetto voice goes beyond the aesthetics of pure sound to form part of a transgendered staging of the artistic persona (e.g., David Bowie, Freddie Mercury or Pharrell Williams).

In conjunction with a new production of Gluck’s Antigono for the International Gluck Opera Festival 2019, this interdisciplinary symposium approaches this complex subject from a variety of historical contexts, theoretical perspectives, and methodological vistas.

Possible themes include:

  • High male voices as part of the staging of artistic personalities in historical and contemporary contexts
  • Casting conventions in 18th-century musical theater
  • Aesthetics of counter song in Neue Musik as well as popular musical forms of the 20th and 21st centuries
  • Countertenors in contemporary historical performance practice
  • High male voices and the aesthetics of reception
  • Gender stereotypes in 18th-century musical theater and 20th/21st-century vocal music

Individual presentations are allocated 20 minutes, followed by 10-minutes of discussion. The conference languages are German and English. Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words in German or English, as well as a short biography (CV, research interests), to gluck–forschungsstelle@sbg.ac.at no later than 15 August 2018. Acceptance notifications will be sent out by the end of September 2018.

Concept and Organization

  • Dr. Irene Brandenburg (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)
  • Prof. Dr. Nils Grosch (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)
  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Seedorf (University of Music, Karlsruhe)
  • Dr. Ingeborg Zechner (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)http://www.gluck-forschungsstelle.uni-salzburg.at

 

Connections and Communication in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching

The University of York Music Department is delighted to host its second Music Education conference: 

‘Connections and Communication in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching’.

This event will bring together teachers, researchers, and performers to explore connections and communication in instrumental and vocal music teaching. This topic can be approached in numerous ways and we welcome submissions from students and professionals who have related views and experience. There will be a balance of practical and theoretical submissions across the two days and we are keen to support early career professionals as well as students, independent scholars and music teachers.

The conference will take place on Tuesday 26th June and Wednesday 27th June 2018 in The Rymer Auditorium at the University of York (see travel information page for further details on the venue and access).

The event is organised by staff and students on the MA in Music Education: Instrumental and Vocal Teaching, at the University of York.


Call for Papers

Please send your proposal to mecy-18@york.ac.uk  by 18.00 on 16th May 2018.

The conference topic is intentionally broad to encourage submissions from a range of perspectives. To facilitate this, four session types will be considered: 20-minute spoken presentations, poster presentations, 40-minute practical sessions, and 60-minute ‘diverse format’ sessions.

For information on submission guidelines go to our website.


For further information please contact:

FAO: Dr. E Haddon

Music Department,
University of York,
Heslington,
York YO10 5DD,

email: mecy-18@york.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1904 324564,

Music and Literature: Innovations, Intersections and Interpretations

Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh

14th – 15th June 2018

Supported by the Institute of Music Research

Held in one of the cultural capitals of Europe, this conference will bring together scholars working in the interdisciplinary field of music and literature. Hosted by the School of Arts and Creative Industries at Edinburgh Napier University, and kindly supported by the Institute of Music Research, the conference will provide an opportunity for traditional and performance-based presentations to explore the multifaceted connections that exist between the two disciplines.

Keynote speaker: Prof. Peter Dayan (University of Edinburgh)

Registration is now open! Please visit the conference website for more information: https://musicandliteratureconference.wordpress.com

You can follow us on Twitter, and like our Facebook page to stay up to date.

isaScience 2018 “Participatory Approaches to Music & Democracy”

The conference isaScience 2018 is part of isa, the International Summer Academy of the mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Austria.

https://www.mdw.ac.at/isa/isascience
Conference date: 10–14 August 2018

Conference venue: Hotel Marienhof, Reichenau an der Rax, Austria

Keynote: David Hesmondhalgh, Professor for Media, Music and Culture, University of Leeds, UK

Organisers: Dagmar Abfalter, Marko Kölbl, Rosa Reitsamer, Fritz Trümpi

Over the last few decades, a rich body of literature has explored how individuals and groups use music as a resource to achieve social, cultural and political participation and to bring about social change in society. 
Studies have also investigated music’s use by political groups and parties in the past and present that impose 
authoritarian, neoliberal or even fascist political ideas. Finally, research is concerned with the promise and 
myth of democratization through technology in regard to music production, distribution and reception/appropriation.

The organisers of isaScience welcome papers on music and democracy from a wide range of disciplines 
(e.g. musicology, ethnomusicology, music sociology, cultural studies, queer studies, postcolonial studies, arts and cultural management) addressing (but not limited to) the following themes and topics:

  • Music’s role for historical revolts and revolutions, for propagating national and nationalistic identities in the long 19th century or music’s use in the name of “the people” during fascist and post-fascist periods;
  • Research on performance practices of minorities and marginalised groups that challenge and subvert 
dominant norms and classifications;
  • Democratizing dimensions of orally transmitted music traditions;
  • Grassroots, “bottom-up” and Do-it-Yourself approaches to music and performance propagated by social movements;
  • Research on music and activism: e.g. activist choirs, feminist and queer performance groups, anti-racist rock groups, singer-songwriters etc.
  • Participatory forms of “musicking” (Small) in local, translocal and virtual music “scenes”;
  • Documenting and preserving the “sounds of democracy” and “hidden” popular music’s past: studies on archives, museums and halls of fame;
  • Music, migration, border regimes and exile;
  • Representations of democracy in artistic practices (e.g. composing);
  • Research on “mediamorphosis” (e.g. electrification, digitalisation) and its effects for democratization: “new” possibilities of self-representation, modes of participation for consumers, and business models in the music and media industries;
  • Notions of “epistemic violence” (Spivak) in music research.

Please submit your abstracts (max. 300 words) for papers, panels and innovative formats and 
a short biography and institutional affiliation,

in English language until 15 March 2018 to isascience@mdw.ac.at.
Decisions on the acceptance of your proposal will be announced by 5 April 2018.

Complimentary funding for travel and accommodation
will be available to students and scholars in academic precarity.
Please submit your application after acceptance of your proposal to isascience@mdw.ac.at.

mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna will cover lunch and coffee breaks for the conference – no registration fee.
www.mdw.ac.at/isa/isascience

XIV. International Conference –  CONTEXTUALITY OF MUSICOLOGY – What, How, Why and Because

XIV International Conference of the Department of Musicology,

Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade

Faculty of Music, Belgrade, 24 to 27 October 2018

Deadline for submission of abstracts extended until May 31, 2018

Celebrating 70th anniversary the Department of Musicology of the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, is pleased to announce its Fourteenth International Conference on the topic of Contextuality of Musicology – What, How, Why and Because. The interest for the contextuality of musicology (e.g. M. Veselinović-Hofman, Contextuality of Musicology, New Sound, 1998) and/or practise of the interdisciplinary musicology, showed itself a long time ago at our Department of Musicology, and reflects the awareness of multiple approaches to the interdisciplinary musicology, as well as an importance of integrating knowledge of other disciplines concerning music into the musicological discourse.

It can be said that musicology, in itself, is a multi– and interdisciplinary science regardless of its specifics or, more precisely, a synthetic science that combines the widest possible spectrum of special studies, whereby not one science can remain in its pure state due to constant and inevitable permeations, transmissions and fusions, thus abolishing the conventional division into humanities, social and natural sciences. In fact, during the past decades, the music itself was increasingly turning into the medial (median), intermediary (acting as an intermediate agent between two or more things) and mediatory (pertaining to mediation) field of widely varied interests – social, economic, cultural-political, etc., and aspects of consideration and research –sociological, cultural, philosophical, aesthetic, psychological, physical, physiological, neurological, etc.

However, what is essential is that musicology, whether as historical musicology, or as systematic musicology, has its status of an intermedium (pertaining to the matter that helps transforming one matter into the other, or the fusion of other two or more matters into one), that is, one of its basic characteristics in the context of moving almost complete scientific apparatus at the moment when music is at the heart of the problem. In other words, its natural position of an intermedium enables musicology, thanks to its basic scientific tools – from establishing a fact, which is a historical and/or analytical point of departure, to its contextualization as a scholarly goal – to be the only one in all crucial moments in any music research that could make a vertical cut through all strata of dealing with music. Namely, musicology, therefore, from the very moment of its establishment, turned to the problem of the context.

The everlasting question of the role of outside-music disciplines in musicology shows that thinking about music in context, is not really a new occurrence, but, the question of relations between musical and outside-musical disciplines (regarding the way of setting the thesis, process and type of argumentation, and way of making conclusions) definitely is new, as well as the degree of intensity of their participation in critical, documented and creative contextual musicological questioning and exposure.

Both as a music historian who strives to explain the gist of the sense and the meaning of the events forming history, and as a musicologist pursuing the hermeneutical work which, admittedly, can never reach the ‘true’ meaning of a musical work but only approximate this meaning asymptotically, we think that it is necessary always to keep in mind the ‘call’ of historicity. For the historicity of the place of ‘narrative’, to which ‘narrative is indebted’, is an important context of the credibility of the what and the how, of the validity of establishing and comprehension of the why, and the meaningfulness of the hermeneutical because(from Interview with M. Veselinović-Hofman, Living One’s Own Thought Experience with Music and Musicology, New Sound, 41, 2013).

Open to the contributions not only from musicological and music field but from different fields of humanities and arts, the conference aims at contemporary re/interpretations and re/discoveries of the crucial points of contextuality of musicology.

The above and the following few suggestions are offered as starting-points for consideration:

  • context in music/musicology

  • music/musicology in context

  • contextuality of musicology and (post-)historical, as well as analytical fact

  • contextuality of musicology and musicological aesthetics and poetics of music (from what is autonomously musical in a work to what is latently semantic in it, in a way that implies or stimulates personal insights, and/or personal existence in a musical work, as a sort of hermeneutical completion – cf. Interview with M. Veselinović-Hofman)

  • contextuality of musicology and contemporary creation – current phenomena in and outside music: technological and compositional-technical innovations, various efforts in media, style and theory, the possibility of contextual insight, necessarily related to the problem area of this here and now (cf. Interview with M. Veselinović-Hofman)

  • contextuality of musicology and performing

  • contextuality of musicology and media – mixed media, polymedia, intermedia

  • contextuality of musicology and technology – human, non-human

  • contextuality of musicology and language, as well as writing

  • contextuality of musicology and subject(ivity)

  • contextuality of musicology and utopia, (post)delusion, nostalgia, melancholy, and/or activism, technological progress

  • contextuality of musicology and interdisciplinary challenges, humanities

Academics of all fields of musicology are invited, including those dealing with music from the position of other disciplines.

Please submit your paper topic (including the thematic area as listed above) to Ivana Petković or Radoš Mitrović or Stefan Cvetković at e-mail address: muzikologija#fmu.bg.ac.rs(please change ‘#’ with ‘@’)

The submission deadline is May 31, 2018.

Please include your short biography and an abstract of 250 words. You will be notified by June 15, 2018. if your topic has been accepted.

The official language of the conference is English. It is possible to deliver papers also in German, French, Russian, and Serbian, but the authors are kindly requested to provide translation in English.

The time limit for the presentation and discussion of your paper is set at 30 minutes in total. Selected papers presented at the conference will be published in the proceedings.

Conference fee: Both participation at the Conference and the publication of a text whose topic has been accepted by the Program Committee are conditional upon the payment of the participation fee. The travel expenses, per diem expenses and hotel accommodation, are to be covered by the participants.

Payment instructions: The fee can be paid on the spot (90) or with PayPal (early bird, 70 ).

Students fee is 50 .

Participants will be notified about PayPal payments instructions.

Keynote Speakers:

Richard Taruskin, PhD

Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkley, Department of Music

Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, PhD

Full Time Professor – Retired, University of Arts in Belgrade, Faculty of Music

Program Committee:

Marcel Cobussen, PhD, Leiden University, Faculty of Humanities, Academy of Creative and Performing Arts

Marija Masnikosa, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Vesna Mikić, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Perković, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Tijana Popović Mlađenović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Nico Schüler, PhD, Texas State University, San Marcos

Leon Stefanija, PhD, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana

Ana Stefanović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Dragana Stojanović-Novičić, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Chris Walton, PhD, University of Stellenbosch

Organizing Committee:

Stefan Cvetković, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Marina Marković, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade
Marija Masnikosa, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Vesna Mikić, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Miladinović-Prica, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Radoš Mitrović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Perković, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Petković, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Tijana Popović Mlađenović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ana Stefanović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade