CfP: The “Other” Voice: High Male Voices between Gluck and Rock

A Symposium of the International Gluck Opera Festival in Nuremberg, 5-7 July 2019

The international symposium, “The ‘Other’ Voice: High Male Voices between Gluck and Rock”, which will take place during the International Gluck Opera Festival in Nuremberg from 5-7 July 2019, seeks to address current research questions about the meaning, appropriation, aesthetic, and reception of high male voices in musical theater of the 18th century through to Pop and Rock.

Musical theater at the time of Christoph Willibald Gluck was shaped in large part by performing vocalists, which, particularly with the castrati in Italian opera seria, can be traced back to culturally conditioned aesthetic preferences for both high (male) voices and an ideal sonority (typical for the period), just as much to institutional factors, casting conventions, public expectations, and mechanisms of reception relating to voice, body, gender, and image.

That the object of fascination, the high male voice, is not limited to opera at the time of Gluck reveals corresponding trends in music of the 20th and 21st centuries, where high-range vocal parts for male performers are omnipresent—in theatrical and non-theatrical vocal genres alike. The casting of parts for countertenors, from Benjamin Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream to György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabreand Olga Neuwirth’s Bählamms Fest, continues to enjoy great popularity. It also represents important facets of musical theater up to the present day. Indeed, high male and falsetto voices are also of great musical and aesthetic importance in the realms of Pop (e.g., James Blunt, Justin Timberlake, A-ha, etc.) and Rock music (e.g., ACDC, Placebo, etc.). In certain instances, furthermore, the timbre generated by the falsetto voice goes beyond the aesthetics of pure sound to form part of a transgendered staging of the artistic persona (e.g., David Bowie, Freddie Mercury or Pharrell Williams).

In conjunction with a new production of Gluck’s Antigono for the International Gluck Opera Festival 2019, this interdisciplinary symposium approaches this complex subject from a variety of historical contexts, theoretical perspectives, and methodological vistas.

Possible themes include:

  • High male voices as part of the staging of artistic personalities in historical and contemporary contexts
  • Casting conventions in 18th-century musical theater
  • Aesthetics of counter song in Neue Musik as well as popular musical forms of the 20th and 21st centuries
  • Countertenors in contemporary historical performance practice
  • High male voices and the aesthetics of reception
  • Gender stereotypes in 18th-century musical theater and 20th/21st-century vocal music

Individual presentations are allocated 20 minutes, followed by 10-minutes of discussion. The conference languages are German and English. Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words in German or English, as well as a short biography (CV, research interests), to gluck–forschungsstelle@sbg.ac.at no later than 15 August 2018. Acceptance notifications will be sent out by the end of September 2018.

Concept and Organization

  • Dr. Irene Brandenburg (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)
  • Prof. Dr. Nils Grosch (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center)
  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Seedorf (University of Music, Karlsruhe)
  • Dr. Ingeborg Zechner (University of Salzburg, Gluck Research Center) 

    http://www.gluck-forschungsstelle.uni-salzburg.at

 

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Connections and Communication in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching

The University of York Music Department is delighted to host its second Music Education conference: 

‘Connections and Communication in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching’.

This event will bring together teachers, researchers, and performers to explore connections and communication in instrumental and vocal music teaching. This topic can be approached in numerous ways and we welcome submissions from students and professionals who have related views and experience. There will be a balance of practical and theoretical submissions across the two days and we are keen to support early career professionals as well as students, independent scholars and music teachers.

The conference will take place on Tuesday 26th June and Wednesday 27th June 2018 in The Rymer Auditorium at the University of York (see travel information page for further details on the venue and access).

The event is organised by staff and students on the MA in Music Education: Instrumental and Vocal Teaching, at the University of York.


Call for Papers

Please send your proposal to mecy-18@york.ac.uk  by 18.00 on 16th May 2018.

The conference topic is intentionally broad to encourage submissions from a range of perspectives. To facilitate this, four session types will be considered: 20-minute spoken presentations, poster presentations, 40-minute practical sessions, and 60-minute ‘diverse format’ sessions.

For information on submission guidelines go to our website.


For further information please contact:

FAO: Dr. E Haddon

Music Department,
University of York,
Heslington,
York YO10 5DD,

email: mecy-18@york.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1904 324564,

Music and Literature: Innovations, Intersections and Interpretations

Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh

14th – 15th June 2018

Supported by the Institute of Music Research

Held in one of the cultural capitals of Europe, this conference will bring together scholars working in the interdisciplinary field of music and literature. Hosted by the School of Arts and Creative Industries at Edinburgh Napier University, and kindly supported by the Institute of Music Research, the conference will provide an opportunity for traditional and performance-based presentations to explore the multifaceted connections that exist between the two disciplines.

Keynote speaker: Prof. Peter Dayan (University of Edinburgh)

Registration is now open! Please visit the conference website for more information: https://musicandliteratureconference.wordpress.com

You can follow us on Twitter, and like our Facebook page to stay up to date.

isaScience 2018 “Participatory Approaches to Music & Democracy”

The conference isaScience 2018 is part of isa, the International Summer Academy of the mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Austria.

https://www.mdw.ac.at/isa/isascience
Conference date: 10–14 August 2018

Conference venue: Hotel Marienhof, Reichenau an der Rax, Austria

Keynote: David Hesmondhalgh, Professor for Media, Music and Culture, University of Leeds, UK

Organisers: Dagmar Abfalter, Marko Kölbl, Rosa Reitsamer, Fritz Trümpi

Over the last few decades, a rich body of literature has explored how individuals and groups use music as a resource to achieve social, cultural and political participation and to bring about social change in society. 
Studies have also investigated music’s use by political groups and parties in the past and present that impose 
authoritarian, neoliberal or even fascist political ideas. Finally, research is concerned with the promise and 
myth of democratization through technology in regard to music production, distribution and reception/appropriation.

The organisers of isaScience welcome papers on music and democracy from a wide range of disciplines 
(e.g. musicology, ethnomusicology, music sociology, cultural studies, queer studies, postcolonial studies, arts and cultural management) addressing (but not limited to) the following themes and topics:

  • Music’s role for historical revolts and revolutions, for propagating national and nationalistic identities in the long 19th century or music’s use in the name of “the people” during fascist and post-fascist periods;
  • Research on performance practices of minorities and marginalised groups that challenge and subvert 
dominant norms and classifications;
  • Democratizing dimensions of orally transmitted music traditions;
  • Grassroots, “bottom-up” and Do-it-Yourself approaches to music and performance propagated by social movements;
  • Research on music and activism: e.g. activist choirs, feminist and queer performance groups, anti-racist rock groups, singer-songwriters etc.
  • Participatory forms of “musicking” (Small) in local, translocal and virtual music “scenes”;
  • Documenting and preserving the “sounds of democracy” and “hidden” popular music’s past: studies on archives, museums and halls of fame;
  • Music, migration, border regimes and exile;
  • Representations of democracy in artistic practices (e.g. composing);
  • Research on “mediamorphosis” (e.g. electrification, digitalisation) and its effects for democratization: “new” possibilities of self-representation, modes of participation for consumers, and business models in the music and media industries;
  • Notions of “epistemic violence” (Spivak) in music research.

Please submit your abstracts (max. 300 words) for papers, panels and innovative formats and 
a short biography and institutional affiliation,

in English language until 15 March 2018 to isascience@mdw.ac.at.
Decisions on the acceptance of your proposal will be announced by 5 April 2018.

Complimentary funding for travel and accommodation
will be available to students and scholars in academic precarity.
Please submit your application after acceptance of your proposal to isascience@mdw.ac.at.

mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna will cover lunch and coffee breaks for the conference – no registration fee.
www.mdw.ac.at/isa/isascience

XIV. International Conference –  CONTEXTUALITY OF MUSICOLOGY – What, How, Why and Because

XIV International Conference of the Department of Musicology,

Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade

Faculty of Music, Belgrade, 24 to 27 October 2018

Celebrating 70th anniversary the Department of Musicology of the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, is pleased to announce its Fourteenth International Conference on the topic of Contextuality of Musicology – What, How, Why and Because. The interest for the contextuality of musicology (e.g. M. Veselinović-Hofman, Contextuality of Musicology, New Sound, 1998, http://www.newsound.org.rs/pdf/en/Special_1998/01.Mirjana_Veselinovic-Hofman.pdf) and/or practise of the interdisciplinary musicology, showed itself a long time ago at our Department of Musicology, and reflects the awareness of multiple approaches to the interdisciplinary musicology, as well as an importance of integrating knowledge of other disciplines concerning music into the musicological discourse.

It can be said that musicology, in itself, is a multi– and interdisciplinary science regardless of its specifics or, more precisely, a synthetic science that combines the widest possible spectrum of special studies, whereby not one science can remain in its pure state due to constant and inevitable permeations, transmissions and fusions, thus abolishing the conventional division into humanities, social and natural sciences. In fact, during the past decades, the music itself was increasingly turning into the medial (median), intermediary (acting as an intermediate agent between two or more things) and mediatory (pertaining to mediation) field of widely varied interests – social, economic, cultural-political, etc., and aspects of consideration and research –sociological, cultural, philosophical, aesthetic, psychological, physical, physiological, neurological, etc.

However, what is essential is that musicology, whether as historical musicology, or as systematic musicology, has its status of an intermedium (pertaining to the matter that helps transforming one matter into the other, or the fusion of other two or more matters into one), that is, one of its basic characteristics in the context of moving almost complete scientific apparatus at the moment when music is at the heart of the problem. In other words, its natural position of an intermedium enables musicology, thanks to its basic scientific tools – from establishing a fact, which is a historical and/or analytical point of departure, to its contextualization as a scholarly goal – to be the only one in all crucial moments in any music research that could make a vertical cut through all strata of dealing with music. Namely, musicology, therefore, from the very moment of its establishment, turned to the problem of the context.

The everlasting question of the role of outside-music disciplines in musicology shows that thinking about music in context, is not really a new occurrence, but, the question of relations between musical and outside-musical disciplines (regarding the way of setting the thesis, process and type of argumentation, and way of making conclusions) definitely is new, as well as the degree of intensity of their participation in critical, documented and creative contextual musicological questioning and exposure.

Both as a music historian who strives to explain the gist of the sense and the meaning of the events forming history, and as a musicologist pursuing the hermeneutical work which, admittedly, can never reach the ‘true’ meaning of a musical work but only approximate this meaning asymptotically, we think that it is necessary always to keep in mind the ‘call’ of historicity. For the historicity of the place of ‘narrative’, to which ‘narrative is indebted’, is an important context of the credibility of the what and the how, of the validity of establishing and comprehension of the why, and the meaningfulness of the hermeneutical because(from Interview with M. Veselinović-Hofman, Living One’s Own Thought Experience with Music and Musicology, New Sound, 41, 2013, http://www.newsound.org.rs/pdf/en/ns41/Tijana41.pdf).

Open to the contributions not only from musicological and music field, but from different fields of humanities and arts, the conference aims at contemporary re/interpretations and re/discoveries of the crucial points of contextuality of musicology.

The above and the following few suggestions, are offered as starting-points for consideration:

  • context in music/musicology
  • music/musicology in context
  • contextuality of musicology and (post-)historical, as well as analytical fact
  • contextuality of musicology and musicological aesthetics and poetics of music (from what is autonomously musical in a work to what is latently semantic in it, in a way that implies or stimulates personal insights, and/or personal existence in a musical work, as a sort of hermeneutical completion – cf. Interview with M. Veselinović-Hofman)
  • contextuality of musicology and contemporary creation – current phenomena in and outside music: technological and compositional-technical innovations, various efforts in media, style and theory, the possibility of contextual insight, necessarily related to the problem area of this here and now (cf. Interview with M. Veselinović-Hofman)
  • contextuality of musicology and performing
  • contextuality of musicology and media – mixed media, polymedia, intermedia
  • contextuality of musicology and technology – human, non-human
  • contextuality of musicology and language, as well as writing
  • contextuality of musicology and subject(ivity)
  • contextuality of musicology and utopia, (post)delusion, nostalgia, melancholy, and/or activism, technological progress
  • contextuality of musicology and interdisciplinary challenges, humanities

Academics of all fields of musicology are invited, including those dealing with music from the position of other disciplines.

Please submit your paper topic (including the thematic area as listed above) to Ivana Petković or Radoš Mitrović or Stefan Cvetković at e-mail address: muzikologija#fmu.bg.ac.rs (please exchange ‘#’ for ‘@’)

The submission deadline is April 30, 2018.

Please include your short biography and an abstract of 250 words. You will be notified by May 15, 2018 if your topic has been accepted.

The official language of the conference is English. It is possible to deliver papers also in German, French, Russian, and Serbian, but the authors are kindly requested to provide translation in English.

The time limit for the presentation and discussion of your paper is set at 30 minutes in total. Selected papers presented at the conference will be published in the proceedings.

Conference fee: Both participation at the Conference and the publication of a text whose topic has been accepted by the Program Committee are conditional upon the payment of the participation fee. The travel expenses, per diem expenses and hotel accommodation are to be covered by the participants.

Payment instructions: The fee can be paid on the spot (90) or with PayPal (early bird, 70 ).

Students fee is 50 .

 Participants will be notified about PayPal payments instructions.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Richard Taruskin, PhD

Professor Emeritus

University of California, Berkley, Department of Music

Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, PhD

Full Time Professor – Retired

University of Arts in Belgrade, Faculty of Music

 

Program Committee:

 Marcel Cobussen, PhD, Leiden University, Faculty of Humanities, Academy of Creative

and Performing Arts

Marija Masnikosa, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Vesna Mikić, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Perković, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Tijana Popović Mlađenović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Nico Schüler, PhD, Texas State University, San Marcos

Leon Stefanija, PhD, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana

Ana Stefanović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Dragana Stojanović-Novičić, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Chris Walton, PhD, University of Stellenbosch

 

Organizing Committee:

 Stefan Cvetković, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Marina Marković, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade
Marija Masnikosa, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Vesna Mikić, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Miladinović-Prica, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Radoš Mitrović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Perković, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ivana Petković, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Tijana Popović Mlađenović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

Ana Stefanović, PhD, Faculty of Music of the University of Arts in Belgrade

More information on the conference:

 https://belgradeconference.katedrazamuzikologijufmu.net

 

 

Influence of the Arts in the Middle Ages: Reflexions on the Aquitanian Ms. Paris, BnF, latin 1139

Paris, 19-21 March 2019

Call for Papers

 

The manuscript Paris, BnF, lat. 1139 is a composite manuscript whose origins are not precisely known. It was preserved in the library of the abbey Saint-Martial de Limoges, one of the most prestigious book collections of the Middle Ages, since as early as the middle of the thirteenth century. The manuscript includes the first expressions of a new way of singing  divine praise. These compositions do not so much break with older traditions as add to what already existed.

The oldest and most important part of the manuscript (end 11th-beginning of the 12th century) contains many festive chants: tropes, versified songs (versus and Benedicamus domino, so called nova cantica) troped epistles and liturgical drama (ff. 32r-117r). Also added are votive offices for the BVM, notated in the thirteenth century (ff. 119r-148r), a full sequentiary dating from the end of the twelfth century (ff. 149r-228v), and parts of two other sequentiaries of the thirteenth century (f. 2r-20v). Throughout the manuscript, one can also find texts about liturgical practice and the daily life of the abbey (such as an inventory of altar ornaments, a list of the books in the library, and so on).

This heterogeneous anthology thus allows us to observe repertories sung during as much as two hundred years as well as evolution in the liturgical practices of specific types of celebration. As a diverse collection it reveals the creative dynamic and cultural exchanges enjoyed by Saint-Martial, whilst at the same time indicating a wide network extending across  Southern France and beyond.

This manuscript is an exceptional book, that attracted at an early stage the interest of scholars:

– It includes some of the oldest testimonies of Aquitanian polyphony.

– It has the oldest collection of nova cantica.

– It includes several liturgical drama, among them the Sponsus, which is unique to this source.

– It sits at the crossroads between Latin and vernacular repertories.

– The notator of the oldest part used a sign in the form of a rhombus to indicate semi-tones. This notational particularity was quickly abandoned in the South of France but was widely adopted in the West of the Iberian Peninsula, especially in Portugal.

 

An inventory of the oldest part was made by Hans Spanke (1931); Judith M. Marshall devoted her entire, mainly analytical PhD dissertation (1961) to lat. 1139. Jacques Chailley (1952), Sarah Fuller (1969) and Leo Treitler (1978) also included this manuscript in their studies of the Aquitanian repertory. It appears that many chants copied in latin 1139 have concordances in sources not only from Southern France but also in the festive offices of the Circumcision from Beauvais, Sens and Le Puy (Wulf Arlt, 1970, 2000) in addition to other manuscripts from further afield.

This conference is open to scholars from many disciplines (history, art history, history of literature, musicology, philology, palaeography…) in order to tackle all the aspects of this complex manuscript. The meeting will provide an opportunity to fill lacunae in the historiography, especially in dealing with the more recent sections of the manuscript. We will therefore consider the manuscript itself, and, at the same time, attempt to place it within a wider context, beginning with the abbey of Saint-Martial and then within networks of creation and dissemination beyond the Limousin territory. The specificity of this conference will lie in the assessment of the circulation of artistic and intellectual practices. From this perspective, latin 1139 will be the starting point for a renewed study of creativity at the heart of the Midi and of its spread in space and time, but the manuscript itself will not be the only focus.

 

Papers might deal with the following themes (but are not limited to these):

Influence: comparison of Paris, BnF, latin 1139 with other sources

– palaeographic questions, both musical and textual; the use of the neumatic characteristics of the manuscript’s notations in other traditions (above all in the Iberian Peninsula);

– musical and literary features of the repertory;

– codicological approaches, presentation, layout and decoration of the manuscript in  relation to a larger context of manuscripts.

Dissemination: Saint-Martial de Limoges as a musical and artistic centre

            – the position of Saint-Martial with regard to the dissemination of repertories and artistic practices from the Limousin into other regions;

– the abbey as a creative centre as well as its reception of external material;

– the circulation and transfer of manuscripts to and from the library of Saint-Martial;

– the liturgy and communal life of the abbey, as revealed by the musical repertories and the non musical additions in latin 1139.

Circulation: the reception and destiny of repertories notated in Paris, BnF, latin 1139

– consideration of the dissemination, networks of repertories notated in latin 1139: manuscripts from Norman Sicily, offices of the Circumcision, German manuscripts including the Carmina Burana, Cantatoria from Prague, etc.;

– relationships between the repertories of latin 1139 and Parisian sources of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries (nova cantica, sequences);

– consideration of the complex material aspects of the manuscript as testimony to ways of using books and repertories: transformations and re-compositions in response to new needs;

– exchanges and crossovers between Latin (versus, tropes, epistles, etc.) and vernacular repertories.

 

Papers will be published following a peer-review process.

Please see http://colloque1139.fr/ for more information.

 

Scientific Committee:

Maria Alessandra Bilotta (IEM-FCSH/NOVA, Lisbonne)

Océane Boudeau (CESEM-FCSH/NOVA, Lisbonne ; EPHE/SAPRAT, Paris)

François Bougard (CNRS, IRHT, Paris)

Pascale Bourgain (Centre Mabillon/École nationale des Chartes, Paris)

Christelle Cazaux-Kowalski (FHNW / Musik Akademie Basel, Schola Cantorum Basiliensis)

Christelle Chaillou (CNRS, CESCM, Poitiers)

Marie-Noël Colette (EPHE/SAPRAT, Paris)

Gilbert Dahan (EPHE/LEM, Paris)

Charlotte Denoël (Centre Mabillon/École nationale des Chartes, Paris)

Manuel Pedro Ferreira (CESEM-FCSH/NOVA, Lisbonne)

Andreas Haug (Universität Würzburg)

Katarina Livljanić (Université Paris-Sorbonne, IReMus)

Guy Lobrichon (CIHAM UMR 5648 – Université d’Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse)

Christian Meyer (CNRS, CESR, Tours)

Susan Rankin (University of Cambridge)

Anne-Zoé Rillon-Marne (UCO, Angers ; CESCM, Poitiers)

 

Organisation Committee:

Océane Boudeau (CESEM-FCSH/NOVA, Lisbon ; EPHE/SAPRAT, Paris)

Anne-Zoé Rillon-Marne (UCO, Angers ; CESCM, Poitiers)

The conference will take place on 19-21 March 2019 in the Bibliothèque nationale de France (58, rue de Richelieu, 75002 Paris), the Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes (40, avenue d’Iéna, 75116 Paris), and the Fondation Calouste Gulbenkian – Délégation en France (39, bd de La Tour-Maubourg, 75007 Paris).

 

Deadlines:

– Proposals for papers (title and abstract: c. 300 words) to info@colloque1139 : 31 May 2018

– Response fram the Scientific Committee: 30 June 2018

– Conference: 19-21 March 2019

– Finished texts of papers for peer-review and publication: 30 September 2019

 

Lunch will be offered to speakers. Bursaries for travel and accommodation will be considered case by case, depending on the funding sources for the conference.

Date: 6-8 July, 2018

Place: Hamburg University of Music and Theatre

In 2016[i] a study of the German Cultural Council validated the obvious asymmetry of the sexes in culture and media, particularly with respect to the contemporary music scene. For decades the participation of women had been limited to performing artists, but there was also a remarkable absence of female composers.

Either randomly or induced by the study, contemporaneous initiatives started to discuss sexism in New Music. Examples of this trend include the founding of the group “Gender Relations in Darmstadt (GRID)” [ii], initiated by the composer Ashley Fure at the Darmstädter Ferienkurse 2016. That same year this group presented statistics on the constantly low female participation at the Darmstadt Summer Courses since 1946.[iii] Another example was the panel discussion held at the Donaueschingen Festival 2017 (transmitted via German Southwest Broadcasting, SWR).[iv] However, a comprehensive and fundamental scientific study that questions unconscious and subliminal criteria, for example the preference of mind over body, within the discourses of new music and performance art is lacking.

Methods of ex- and inclusion that ask for sex (and gender) or that include an interdisciplinary approach with criteria like social class, ethnicity or age, shall be questioned at the conference. The symposium will take place shortly before the Darmstadt Summer Course 2018 to give impulses for the discussions. Position papers and panel discussions will include the following topics

New music[v], gender and

  • Institutions since the 1950s
  • Aesthetics
  • Cultural politics
  • Feminism
  • Process of canonisation
  • Concepts of avantgarde
  • Electronic music
  • Experimental music, performance art, neo-conceptual art
  • Discourses of body
  • Digitisation
  • Positions between high and low arts
  • Present contemporary artistic positions
  • Critic of music
  • Musicology
  • Audience
  • Intersectional perspectives

Further proposals are welcome.

The symposium wants to open new discussions; thus, the presentations should include basic aspects and questions. A publication of a selection of the contributions is planned.

Please submit abstracts (up to 2,000 characters including spaces) for 25-minute presentations, and contact details via the email address below by 11 March, 2018. Junior researchers are especially encouraged to apply. The conference will be held in English and German. Thanks to sponsorship from Mariann-Steegmann-Foundation applicants can receive travel costs (max. € 200) and accommodation (max. 2 nights). Decisions will be made until 31 March, 2018.

 

Dr. Vera Grund

Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar Detmold/Paderborn

Hornsche Straße 39

32756 Detmold

vgrund@campus.upb.de

 

Prof. Dr. Nina Noeske

Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg

Harvestehuder Weg 12

20148 Hamburg

nina.noeske@hfmt-hamburg.de

 

[i] Gabriele Schulz, Carolin Ries, Olaf Zimmermann: Frauen in Kultur und Medien. Ein Überblick über aktuelle Tendenzen, Entwicklungen und Lösungsvorschläge, Berlin 2016, online: https://www.kulturrat.de/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Frauen-in-Kultur-und-Medien.pdf.

[ii] https://griddarmstadt.wordpress.com.

[iii] Particularly https://griddarmstadt.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/grid_gender_research_in_darmstadt.pdf. Further statistics http://darmstadt-2016.netlify.com.

[iv] https://www.swr.de/swr-classic/donaueschinger-musiktage/programme/do-19-k-eine-maennersache-neue-musik/-/id=2136962/did=19800128/nid=2136962/1wqxvmu/index.html.

[v] The term “New Music” here is used comprehensively, including experimental music as well as performance art etc.

Iberian musical crossroads through the ages: Images of music-making in their transcultural exchanges

Fifteenth symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Iconography of the Performing Arts
organized by the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Institut d’Estudis Catalans

Barcelona, 17–19 October 2018

Iberian peninsula—the home of Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Basque, and Galician peoples—has been a significant economic and political region through the history, which had been both conquered by the powers coming from elsewhere and generating its own forces exploring and conquering other regions and cultures in the world. From the Bronze Age onwards, explorers and traders used the peninsula as the crossroad between the Mediterranean and much of the rest of the world. The Phoenicians came to Iberia in the ninth century BC, and the Greeks followed two centuries later. The Romans conquest of Hispania started during the second Punic War in 206 BC and by the time of Augustus near the entire peninsula was under the control of Rome. During the Middle Ages, Al-Andalus with its Islamic administration was open to an import of Arab knowledge, philosophy, culture, arts and music. Later on, Spain and Portugal were the strongest naval powers in the world and their overseas explorations have radically altered both the old and new worlds: Spain influenced South American and Caribbean cultures, and even the Philippines; the Portuguese travellers, traders and conquerors reached Brazil, sailed along the African coast, and arrived all the way to India, Malacca, and Macao. Through the crown of Aragon, Catalonia experienced cultural exchanges within the western Mediterranean Sea and southern Italy. In addition to the overseas networks, cultural and artistic exchanges were also occurring in Europe through commercial and political ties, and also through marriages between the royal houses. Throughout the history pilgrims walking the Camino de Santiago, or visiting the shrines of Montserrat or Fatima were bringing with them songs, dances and instruments from all over Europe.

All these and many other explorations and migrations created a fertile framework for a rich exchange of musical ideas, sounds, forms, rhythms, dances, and instruments. The Barcelona conference of the ICTM Study Group on the Iconography of Performing Arts will examine visual sources documenting transborder and transcultural transmission of musical ideas between the peoples of the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world. Papers are invited concerning the following topics:

  • Sounds of the ancient world: The Iberian cultures in an exchange with other Mediterranean traditions
  • Islamic sounds in Al-Andalus
  • Music and dances of Spanish Sephardim
  • Music along the road: Travelers and pilgrimages in Spain and Portugal
  • The Borgia family as a mediator of musical life between Iberia, Rome and the Vatican
  • Music and explorers (Columbus, Vasco da Gama, trade routes to Latin America, Asia, Africa)
  • Portuguese ethnohistoric accounts about music of Brazil, Macao, and Estado da Índia
  • Spanish encounters with music cultures of pre-Colombian America
  • Music in Catholic missions of New Spain and in the Christianization of Goa
  • Exchanges between Catalonia and kingdoms of Naples and Sicily
  • Reception of the Italian opera in Spain and Portugal
  • Zarzuela and other music theater in Latin America
  • Spain as a topos in music exoticism (opera, operetta, ballet, dance); Orientalism in Spanish art
  • Exchanges of musical instruments between Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world
  • Internal musical exchanges between the peoples of the Iberian peninsula
  • Spanish/Portuguese iconographic models used in Latin American decorative programs
  • Transcultural musical topics in the 20th- and 21st-century art
  • Proposals related to other transcultural music exchanges in the world may be also considered

English is preferred language for the conference presentations.
Abstracts of 250–300 words may be submitted before 2 April 2018 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309
zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

and

Jordi Ballester
Societat Catalana de Musicologia
Institut d’Estudis Catalans
Carrer del Carme 47
08001 Barcelona
Jordi.Ballester@uab.cat

CityMAC 2018

CityMAC 2018

5-7 July 2018, City, University of London

The City Music Analysis Conference (CityMAC 2018), sponsored by the Society for Music Analysis (SMA), will take place on Thursday 5th to Saturday 7th July 2018 at City, University of London. This international conference will feature analysis of world music, but welcomes paper proposals on any aspect of theory or analysis relating to music of any genre and historical period.

Keynote speakers

Professor Janet Schmalfeldt (Tufts University) and Professor Richard Widdess (SOAS).
Submission deadline: 5th February, 2018. Applicants will be notified by 16th March, 2018.

Proposal categories

  • Papers (20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion)
  • Paper sessions (three or four papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes per paper for discussion)
  • Roundtable discussions (up to 6 participants, each giving a short position paper, followed by a general discussion, total running time of 90 or 120 minutes)
  • Recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings (maximum duration 90 minutes)

Proposal guidelines

  • For individual papers: up to 250 words
  • For paper sessions: 250-word (maximum) summary and up to 200 words for each session participant
  • For roundtable discussions: 250-word (maximum) and up to 150 words for each panel participant
  • For recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings: 250 word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings / scores / other details of works to be included in the event (contact the organiser to discuss)

Further information for applicants

  • Only one proposal of each type is permitted per applicant
  • Proposals must be sent by email as a MS Word or pdf attachment to CityMAC2018@sma.ac.uk
  • Proposals need not be anonymised.
  • Student members and individuals without access to institutional funds are eligible to apply for an SMA Travel Bursary to help cover the costs of travel and accommodation. Further details can be found here: http://www.sma.ac.uk/grants/travel/. Please note that the deadline for application for bursaries is 7 June 2018.
  • Delegates are also welcome to apply to our Development Fund scheme to cover the cost of attending. For further details, see: http://www.sma.ac.uk/grants/development/. There is no deadline for this fund, but retrospective applications will not be considered.
  • All enquiries should be sent to Dr Shay Loya via CityMAC2018@sma.ac.uk.

Programme committee

Dr Chloë Alaghband-Zadeh (Loughborough), Professor L. Poundie Burstein (Hunter College, CUNY), Dr Esther Cavett (King’s College London), Professor Julian Horton (Durham), Dr Shay Loya (City, Organiser), Professor Danuta Mirka (Southampton), Dr Laudan Nooshin (City), Ian Pace (City), Dr Kenneth Smith (Liverpool).

North-South Interchanges: Collaborations, Tensions, Hybridizations

Organized by

UNESP (State University of São Paulo) – Instituto de Artes, São Paulo (Brazil)

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca (Italy)

Universidad de la República, Montevideo/Salto (Uruguay)

Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES) – Centro de Artes, Vitória (Brazil)

UNESP, Instituto de Artes, São Paulo – Brazil

19-21 September 2018

 

The relations between the music made in South America, and that made in Europe, and in North America has been characterized at times by efforts to approach, some others times by rejection, many times resulting in peculiar hybrids. These same relations reflect in music criticism and in aesthetics, sometimes reinforcing the similarities, sometimes invoking the differences, or even having to deal with musical phenomena for which no specific vocabulary has been invented yet. We part from the argument proposed by Joseph Kerman, «repertories are determined by performers, and canons by critics» (‘A Few Canonic Variations’, in: Critical Inquiry, x/1, Canons [Sep. 1983], pp. 107-125), evoking the strength of the discursive network that develops around musical creation, performance, and its aesthetics. This conference intends to explore the rich and multifarious relations between music-making — understood in a very broad sense — and music criticism and aesthetics that, in some way, deal with or reflect the North-South relations.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The reception of European and North-American music in South America;
  • The reception of South-American music in Europe and in North America;
  • Nationalisms and the adaptation / rejection of foreign models in Music Criticism;
  • The North-South relations in Popular Music Criticism;
  • The North-South relations in Art Music Criticism;
  • Aesthetics, Philosophy of Music and Music Criticism;
  • Nationalisms and aesthetics: discourse between borders;
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy of Music in South America;
  • History of Music Criticism.

Scholarly Committee:

  • Marita Fornaro Bordolli (Universidad de la Respública, Uruguay)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Italy)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Italy)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Italy)
  • Lia Tomás (UNESP – Instituto de Artes, Brazil)
  • Mónica Vermes (Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo – Centro de Artes, Brazil)

The official languages of the conference are English, Spanish and Portuguese. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and no more than 200 words of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 5 May 2018*** to <conferencecriticism2018@ia.unesp.br>. With your proposal, please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail, and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation. The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2018, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel, and accommodation will be announced after that date. For any additional information, please contact:

<conferencecriticism2018@ia.unesp.br>