Popular songs in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

LUCCA, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

30 November – 2 December 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Popular songs in the 19th Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 30 November to 2 December 2019.

Even if its manifestation differs within the cultural areas in which it appears, the vogue of “popular song” seems to become a transnational phenomenon around the years 1820-1830. Following a period of political affirmation and education via the use of songs (during the French Revolution), this repertoire draws on traditional songs that, although often older (sometimes as old as the fifteenth century), are revived. The political and esthetic purposes of these productions remain to be investigated on a european scale.

The aim of this conference is multifaceted: from the investigation of the history of the nineteenth-century song from the beginning of the century up to the First World War, through evaluation and assessment of the repertoire, of the public and of the performance venues, to the isolation and identification of points of contact between different cultures from a global geographical perspective (Francophone, English-speaking, German, Italian, Spanish).

The possible answers to the essential question ‘What is popular song?’ acquire a central role in this context, since they concern not only its physical manifestations–the circumstances and places of performance of this repertoire–but also its meaning and significance: how the repertoire itself reflects the society of its origins.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The Definition of “Popular Song” in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Literary Sources of the Repertoire
  • Musical Influences on the Repertoire
  • The Different Genres of Popular Song
  • Authors, Performers and Public
  • The Types of Entertainment Venues
  • The Production System of the Song in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Geography of the Song in Urban Spaces
  • Dissemination Through Editions, Press, etc.
  • The Cultural and Social Role of Popular Song

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Derek Scott (University of Leeds)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 28 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the half of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Music Patronage in Italy from the 15th- to the 18th- Century

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music Patronage in Italy from the 15th- to the 18th- Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 16 to 18 November 2019.
During the Renaissance and throughout the Baroque and Classical periods, musical production is linked to patronage. Predominantly in the courts – ecclesiastical or secular – the ‘patron’ is a rich person, usually noble, who offers protection and money in exchange for a service. The musician s work on commission, in keeping with the requests of their patrons. Although the artists of the referred period managed to express themselves in works of excellent craftsmanship , it is undeniable that the system repressed or at least channelled their creativity. There is in fact a master-servant relationship between patrons and salaried workers and, although the exposure to each other was close and often collaborative, it is inappropriate to think of an equal relationship.
There are essentially two types of patronage. The first relates to political institutions, to public life, and aims to promote musical events that highlight the wealth and power of the patron in the eyes of rival courts and subjects – hence the birth of the court chapels. The second type belongs to the private sphere, in which the patron, of noble birth and as such in possession of high moral and intellectual virtues, possesses a discriminating artistic sensibility — hence the promotion of chamber music activities, the collecting of rare and valuable musical instruments, and the compilation and collection of musical manuscripts, possibly in deluxe or personalized copies .
This musical production system, as described, lasted until the middle of the nineteenth century, when the advent of capitalism and the rise of the bourgeois class caused the decline of patronage. Musical activity then began to obey the laws of the marketplace, with substantial repercussions on the social status of the musician and his work.
This conference focuses on the various aspects of music patronage in Italy from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

– Patronage and institutions
– The private sphere of patronage
– Music Patronage and the Church
– Patronage and musical genres
– Patronage and censorship
– The patronage system and the social status of the musician
– Patronage and musical print
– Patronage and manuscript production
– Patronage and musical collecting

Programme Committee: 
• Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynotes Speakers:
Iain Fenlon (University of Cambridge)
Reinhard Strohm (University of Oxford)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 14 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
http://www.luigiboccherini.org

RASMB-IMS 2019 Conference: MUSICAL AND CULTURAL OSMOSES IN THE BALKANS, Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019

Call for Papers

The National University of Music in Bucharest in collaboration with the IMS Regional Association for the Study of Music of the Balkans announce an International Musicological Conference on the subject Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans. The conference will take place at the National University of Music Bucharest, on 2–6 September, 2019.

The purpose of the International Musicological Conference is to promote interaction, research, discussion and intercultural dialogue among musicologists, ethnomusicologists, researchers and students from Romania, the Balkans and other countries with an interest on the different local musical traditions in South-East Europe and their interactions to the Mediterranean and broader region.

The conference strongly encourages debating subjects such as art music in the Balkans and its interactions with Western Europe traditions, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine chant, methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Ethnomusicology/Music Anthropology of the Balkans, current issues and approaches in Music Education in the Balkans, music and political regimes.

Proposal may address (but are not limited to) the following categories that fall under the topic of the conference:

  1. Art Music in the Balkans
  2. Byzantine and post-Byzantine chant
  3. Musical encounters: Silk roads across Mediterranean area to Asia
  4. Ethnomusicology – Anthropology
  5. Methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Music Theory
  6. Music and politics

The official conference language is English. However, participants can present in Romanian, having submitted prior to the conference and at a set deadline a translation of the final paper in English.

Proposals are invited for:

  • 20-minute papers
  • Panels of up to four presentations (90 minutes).

Abstracts of 20-minute papers should not exceed 300 words and panels’ proposals should contain the description of the panel’s subject (no more than 100 words) and an abstract (no more than 300 words) for each paper included in the panel.

All proposals should be sent electronically as an attachment to the following email address: IMS2019bucharest@unmb.ro with the subject line: Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans.

The attachment should include the following information as well:

  • Name(s) of the author(s) and institution affiliation (if applicable)
  • Type of proposal
  • Title of the paper/panel proposal
  • Short biographical note of the author(s) (100 words)

Full audiovisual equipment and adequate technical support is available for all presentations.

Important dates:

  • Abstracts of proposals/panels: no later than 31 December 2018
  • Notification of approval: no later than 28 February 2019
  • Submission of finalised papers (only in cases of translated papers from Romanian to English): no later than 1 August 2019

Registration fees:

Participants: 30 Euros (10 Euros for students, including PhD candidates)

Date and venue:

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019, National University of Music Bucharest, 33 Știrbei Vodă Str., Sector 1, 010102 Bucharest, Romania (http://www.unmb.ro).

Contact information:

Further instructions and details will soon be posted on the conference webpage: ims2019bucharest.ro.
See also: http://www.musicology.org/networks/ra/rasmb
Announcements will also appear on the webpage of the National University of Music Bucharest (http://www.unmb.ro) and the New Europe College (http://www.nec.ro).

Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

18-20 October 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Veniceare pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19thCentury», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 18 to 20 October 2019.

It is only in recent years that musicology has seriously begun to focus on opera staging, representing as it does a crucial element in our understanding of theatrical production. The visual component is integral to the compositional process of opera; it is already present in the stage directions contained in scene booklets and scores, before finding its ultimate form in the most comprehensive examples of stage-booklets. Cross-comparison of these books with the score, sets, costumes and press reports, often accompanied by illustrations and photographs of the scenery, can now generate an understanding of the ‘three-dimensionality’ of a particular opera.

The present conference aims to address several facets of the artistic expression of a live performance, in particular focusing on the technical issues, people and institutions related to it. Thus dance, musical theatre, mime, puppetry, and other performing arts will be investigated through the lens of their various components— staging, lighting, sound, costumes, theatrical machines — as well as their protagonists — impresarios, tournée, companies, designers, conductors and directors.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • Stage Machinery: Scene Changes, Lighting, Sound Effects, Set, Illusions, etc.
  • Economical and Administrative Issues
  • Companies and Tournées
  • Stage Direction, Movements and Gestures
  • Impresarios, Actors, Dancers, Designers, Conductors, etc.
  • Mime, Puppetry, Dance and Choreography
  • The Venues of Entertainment
  • Press, Staging Manuals, Literature and Handbooks

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Scott Palmer (School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds)
  • Catrina Flint (Vanier College, Montréal).

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 7 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Singing Speech and Speaking Melodies: Musical Theatre (1650-1918)

organized by
Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini (Lucca)

Research Group ERASMUSH, University of Oviedo (Oviedo, Spain)

Oviedo, Edificio Histórico de la Universidad
09 – 11 May 2019

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and the Research Group ERASMUSH of the University of Oviedo (Spain) are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Singing Speech and Speaking Melodies: Musical Theatre (1650-1918)», to be held in Oviedo, Edificio Histórico de la Universidad de Oviedo (Historic Building of the University of Oviedo), from Thursday 9 to Saturday 11 May 2019.

This conference aims to deal with the complex world of the variety of stage works such as vaudeville, singspiel, zarzuela, operetta, opéra-comique, intermezzo, tonadilla or ballad opera, that were born around the establishment of Opera as a musical genre in different European Countries. Most of them with a long life, flourished during the 19th and the beginning of 20th century , becoming then a mass phenomenon that gathered a large audience. Despite the many differences, all of these forms of musical theatre share an alternation of sung parts and spoken dialogue , and some of them dance too. During their evolution and dissemination around the world, many of these genres of musical theater have maintained their denomination but changed their forms and literary-musical references, sometimes enriched with foreign contributions and inbreading between closely related genres. This development has created some epistemological problems about what zarzuela, operetta or opéra-comique means in the different periods of its life.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

• Repertoire and analysis of models
• Dramaturgical roles of the singing & of the spoken word
• Literary sources and influences
• Sources, relationships and divergences
• Production system, consumption, entertainment system
• In & out of Europe: dissemination and adaptation of theatrical genres
• Performing practice: Do the singers speak or the actors sing?
• The public and its social component
• Musical aesthetics and criticism
• Scene, choreography and dance
• Costumes, Decorations and Scenic Design
• Editing theatrical music: from the piano to the orchestral accompaniment

Programme Committee:
• María Encina Cortizo (Universidad de Oviedo)
• Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
• Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Ramón Sobrino (Universidad de Oviedo)

Keynote Speakers:
• María Encina Cortizo (Universidad de Oviedo)
• Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)

The official languages of the conference are English, Spanish, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 3 February 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of February 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Music and the Internet: a Joint Study Day of the RMA & BFE

– CALL FOR PAPERS –
Music and the Internet
A Joint Study Day of the RMA & BFE
University of Oxford
Saturday 8th December 2018
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Georgina Born
Roundtable Speakers: TBC

Since the turn of the millennium, music and the Internet have become increasingly entangled with one another. For many Internet users, the musical web has become an integral part of everyday life, while worldwide digitization initiatives have transformed musical production practices and modes of consumption. In their recent Music & Letters article, Georgina Born and Christopher Haworth note that the Internet ‘multiplies music’s discursive and social mediation, engendering new online entities, practices, and relations, which may themselves augment, publicize, and globalize offline forms’. Alluding to new research directions, they reason that the study of Internet-mediated music ‘necessitates interdisciplinary approaches that integrate digital methods with both ethnography and history’ (Born & Haworth 2018: 603, 647).

Responding to these developments, this BFE & RMA study day seeks to foster dialogue between musicologists and ethnomusicologists who are interested in the online mediation of music and novel methodological approaches that support its study. How is the Internet involved in the formation of musical and political subjects? What can we learn from online interactions between artists and fans, performers and audiences? Why have musical memes become a contagious aspect of popular culture in the current decade? In what ways does the Internet afford renewed interest in music making among large corporations? Who are the users that make use of the musical web, and on whose terms do they play and listen?

We invite proposals for papers of 20-minutes, which will each be followed by 10 minutes of discussion. The keynote address will be given by Professor Georgina Born and the day will conclude with a roundtable on digital research methodologies. We particularly welcome papers by graduate students and early career researchers.

Prospective paper topics may include (but are not limited to):

 The online consumption of music: YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, etc.
 The transformation of music economies and the emergence of the digital music commodity
 Emancipation, control, and the politics of Internet use
 The materialities and social meanings of digital music technologies
 Online communities and the construction of celebrity personae
 Internet-mediated music genres
 Interdisciplinary approaches to musical memes and user-generated content
 The use of smartphones for music creation and dissemination
 Internet piracy and reconfigurations of Intellectual Property
 Digital methodologies: using the Internet for ethnographic and musicological inquiry

Paper titles and abstracts of 250 words should be sent to musicinternetoxford@gmail.com by 9th September 2018.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by 7th October 2018.

Programme Committee:

Pablo Infante-Amate (University of Oxford), Edward Spencer (University of Oxford), Georgina Born (University of Oxford), Eric Clarke (University of Oxford)

Study Day Website: https://musicinternetoxford.wordpress.com/

Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music

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CFP. Submission deadline: December 15, 2018

Música Analítica 2019:
Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Porto, Portugal: March 21–23, 2019

http://artes.porto.ucp.pt/pt/central-eventos/musica-analitica-2019-porto-international-symposium-analysis-and-theory-music

The Research Center for Science and Technology in the Arts (CITAR) at the School of Arts, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, invites the submission of paper proposals to Música Analítica 2019: Porto International Symposium on the Analysis and Theory of Music, taking place in Porto, Portugal, March 21-23, 2019.

The symposium promotes the notion of music as analysis and analysis as music – a gloss on “música analítica”- arguing that our discursive modes of analysis are not outside of music or simply an enriching addition we bring to it but rather integral to the way we may experience, conceive, and music. In short, implicit or explicit analysis is implicated in the way we reframe, process, and construct time and sound, including aspects such as gesture or communal experience into/as music.

The symposium’s thematic range is inclusive, welcoming submissions from a variety of perspectives on music analysis and theory (speculative, practical, historical) or attendant to the multifarious intersections with disciplines such as music history, composition, critical theory, ethnomusicology, performance, sound art, mathematics, cognitive sciences, and technology. In addition, pedagogical approaches that address methodological and social implications of music analysis are particularly encouraged.

Reflecting the scope of the meeting, the symposium will feature the following speakers:

Keynote Speakers:

  • Richard Cohn (Yale University)
  • Judit Frigyesi (Bar-Ilan University)
  • Sílvio Ferraz (Universidade de São Paulo)

Plenary Speakers:

  • Bianca Temes (Music Academy, Cluj)
  • Christopher Bochmann (Universidade de Évora)
  • Isabel Pires (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
  • José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • Michiel Schuijer (Conservatorium van Amsterdam)
  • Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira (CITAR, ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Moreno Andreatta (IRCAM, CNRS, UPMC-Paris)
  • Miguel Borges Coelho (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Naomi Waltham-Smith (University of Warwick)
  • Paulo Ferreira de Castro (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova de Lisboa)
  • Steve Rings (University of Chicago)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
We invite scholars from various disciplines to contribute to this international symposium (the language of the symposium is English). Please send a proposal for an oral communication (20′ presentation +10′ discussion) no later than December 15, 2018, to the email: musicaanalitica2019@porto.ucp.pt. We project a response by Jan 5, 2019.

The proposal should consist of two separate pdf. files:

  • (1) Title of the communication and an abstract detailing your topic, approach, argument, and main findings, with a max. 350 words. Also include 5 keywords, and up to 8 bibliographic references. The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, proposal, MA2019].
  • (2) Information about the author(s): Name, Institutional affiliation, e-mail, title of the talk, and a short biographical note (max. 150 words). The file should have the designation [LAST NAME, info, MA2019]

__________

Organizing Committee

  • José Oliveira Martins (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Sofia Serra (CITAR-EA/Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Daniel Moreira (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
  • Paulo Perfeito (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)
  • Telmo Marques (CITAR, ESMAE/Instituto Politécnico do Porto)

Scientific Committee
[Plenary Speakers listed above are also SC members]

  • Adriana Lopes Moreira (Universidade de São Paulo)
  • Áine Heneghan (University of Michigan)
  • André Perrotta (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • António Augusto Aguiar (ESMAE/Inst. Politécnico do Porto)
  • Antonio Grande (Conservatorio di Musica “G. Verdi” di Como)
  • Benoît Gibson (Universidade de Évora)
  • Carlos Caires (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
  • Carlos Guedes (New York University, Abu Dhabi)
  • Catello Gallotti (Conserv. di Musica “Giuseppe Martucci” di Salerno)
  • Gilberto Bernardes (INESC TEC/Univ. do Porto and Univ. de Aveiro)
  • Ildar Khannanov (Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University)
  • Jean-Pierre Bartoli (Sorbonne Université)
  • João Pedro d’Alvarenga (CESEM, Univ. Nova Lisboa)
  • João Pedro Paiva de Oliveira (Universidade de Aveiro)
  • John Koslovsky (Conservatorium van Amsterdam; Utrecht Univ.)
  • Manuel Pedro Ferreira, (CESEM, FCSH/Univ. Nova Lisboa)
  • Mário Baroni (Università di Bologna)
  • Mattia Bergomi (Fund. Champalimaud, Center for the Unknown)
  • Mine Dogantan-Dack (University of Cambridge)
  • Nicolas Meeùs (SBAM, and IReMus)
  • Paulo de Tarso Salles (Universidade São Paulo)
  • Pedro Pestana (CITAR-EA/Univ. Católica Portuguesa)
  • Robert Hasegawa (McGill University)
  • Rodolfo Coelho de Souza (Universidade de São Paulo)
  • Rui Penha (INESC TEC/Universidade do Porto)
  • Sanja Kiš Žuvela (University of Zagreb)
  • Sérgio Azevedo (ESML/Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa)
  • Sigrun Heinzelmann (University Mozarteum Salzburg)
  • Sławomira Zeranska-Kominek (University of Warsaw)
  • Vasilis Kallis (University of Nicosia)

 

Music in the body – body in music: The body at the intersection of musical practice and discourse

      • Conference, 5th/6th of September 2019, Department of Musicology, Georg-August-University of Göttingen
    • Our body forms the basis of all musical acts, utterances and experiences. As sonic waves, music impacts the body immediately. Musical instruments vibrate through human bodily action. Notated scores become music through the bodies of their performers. The effects of a Rock’n’Roll classic manifest bodily through physical movement in dance. Despite the undeniable presence and importance of the body in music production and reception, the body has been marginalised in historical musicology. This neglect persists despite the attention to the body as medium and location of knowledge in other disciplines throughout the humanities and social sciences. The body enjoys critical scholarly discussion and analysis since the performative turn in fields such as affect-, gender- and performance-studies, and these fields are explored in popular music studies, Ethno-, and cultural musicology. But these approximations have yet to amount to a rethinking of music in terms of its corporeality. Musicology often operates within a conception of music that is anchored to autonomy aesthetics, which is characterised by a “marginalisation of the body through the autonomy of the mind” (Traudes 2012). Not only is the performing body conceived as a transparent medium, transporting the mind-driven intentions of the composer, but the listening ideal is moreover not one of bodily reaction, but intellectual reflection. Consequently, the ‘music itself’ remains within the notated work requiring a certain ideological reading. As musicologists, the current tasks facing us are to examine the effects this ignorance of the body has had on our understanding of music (history) and detailing strategies to overcome this inattention. Furthermore, the consequences of including the body in our thinking about music must be analysed and critically discussed.
    • This conference aims to open ways into a foundational critical discussion of the above, questioning how the body and (musical) knowledge can be conceptually connected. To what extent are musicological questions impacted by the topic’s prevalence in other disciplines? How can we think of the body as a central musicological category?
    • This conference will examine the bodily dimensions of historical, social, symbolical and cultural practice in music along two related sections: music production and reception. With this, the aim is to discuss how the conceptualisation of the body beyond the dualism of body and mind also helps thinking beyond musical dualisms. Understanding the body as a tool for analysis possibly allows the body to become an intersection of knowledge, agency, discourse and practice. In this respect, the body is a shared locus of musical reception, interpretation and production, and can overturn the dualism of production and reception. The conference will accommodate this idea of intersection by bringing the contributions of the two conference sections into dialogue.

1. Composing the Performance? – staging the body in and to music

    • Questions: Corporeality is perceivable in performance, in visible staging, and in performers’ behaviour while musicking. Can corporeality also be detected as a principle of expression inherent to music, as a body inscribed into (musical) text? How can the resulting blurring of composing, performing and listening body be grasped analytically? How can we understand the body as a tool for music analysis?
    • Possible topics:
      • Musical text as staging strategy for the performing body: musical notation as prescriptive medium for bodily action and movement
      • From transparent medium to en-composed body: blurring of inner-musical and performing body
      • Body as fabric and interface of performative action (sensorially, sensually or sensationally)
      • The role of the interpreter/performer in the body-mind-dualism
      • Perception and presentation of the body on stage
      • Body as analytical key concept: How are discursive norms for the body produced, how do those norms structure our perception and practice?
      • Influence of the body and its potential for movement on the development of sign systems for music notation

2. Historical configurations of listening bodies as intersecting spaces of outside and inside
Questions: How is the bodily listening apparatus related to body norms and body experiences? What relationship does the listening body have to multi-sensory outward space and to concepts of inwardness or the self?

Possible topics:

      • History of the ears and the auditive body
      • Historical construction of listening bodies: disciplining, forming, fashioning listening skills, listening knowledge and listening abilities in the context of repertoires and canons, socio-historical practice, ethical norms, political dynamics, aesthetic norms, the history of knowledge, medicine and psychology
      • bodily listening attitudes, listening roles, listening habits and listening practice
      • The bodily sensory apparatus, historically, culturally, socially located between outside and inside spaces. Sensory apparatus used as receiver, medium, communicator, black box, interface, performer, arranger, multiplier…
      • History of embodiment in sonic space
      • Production of the subject through bodily perception, history of the body-mind-dualism
      • Naturalisation and deconstruction of listening bodies

This call for papers is directed towards advanced postgraduate and doctoral students, post-docs and senior scholars. Contributions from different fields of musicology as well as transdisciplinary contributions are welcome.
Individual papers will last 20 minutes with 10 minutes of discussion. It is possible to apply with a panel proposal comprised of max. three individual 20-minute-papers. Conference languages are German and English. A conference publication is intended. Please submit a paper abstract in German or English (max. 300 words) along with a short biography (max. 100 words) until the 1st of November 2018 to one of the organisers. Contributors will be informed about paper acceptance by the end of December 2018.
Expenses for travel and accommodation may be covered depending on successful funding applications and cannot be guaranteed at this point.
We look forward to your submissions!

 

World of Bob Dylan

Overview

In 2016, the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa jointly announced the acquisition of the Bob Dylan Archive–an extraordinary collection of material that includes over 6,000 items, including recordings, manuscripts, film, notebooks and much more.  These materials have already begun to open up new ways of understanding not just Dylan and his work, but the broader history of popular music both in America and around the world.  Tulsa is already home to the Woody Guthrie Center and will soon welcome OKPOP, which will house collections related to Leon Russell, Wanda Jackson, Roy Clark, Bob Wills, and more.  The Bob Dylan Archive will thus rest at the center of a rich array of resources focused on twentieth-century popular music of all kinds.

To help advance this work, the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies, in cooperation with the Bob Dylan Archive, Gilcrease Museum, and the departments of English, Art, Music, and History, will host an international symposium on the Nobel Laureate from May 30 to June 2, 2019.  We aim to bring together scholars, critics, performers, collectors, and fans in order to help mark the arrival of the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa and continue the already lively inquiry into one of the world’s most innovative and influential artists.  The organizing committee now seeks proposals for papers, panels, and roundtable discussions on all aspects of Dylan’s work, context, influences, and legacy.

Rather than trying to work around a single theme, this symposium welcomes proposals on any topic related to Dylan’s music, art, life, and context.  We particularly encourage interdisciplinary proposals that work across fields such as literature, music, history, sociology, art, media studies, and biography.  We also welcome and encourage work in a variety of different formats including digital and artistic projects.  Keynote events will include a deep dive into the Archive’s treasures, discussions with musicians who toured with Dylan, and lectures by leading music writers and scholars.

Individual Proposals

The organizing committee welcomes proposals for 15 to 20-minutes papers and presentations.  To submit, please send a title, a 250-word abstract that summarizes the topic and complete contact information (name, email, and any institutional affiliation). The organizers will group these papers into panels.

Panel Proposals

Panels consist of three or four speakers focused on a common topic or idea.  To submit a panel proposal, the chair should send a 500-word abstract that includes a name for the session as well as presentation titles for each participant.  The chair and each proposed panelist should provide an email address and any institutional affiliation.

Roundtable Proposals

These special sessions are meant to encourage conversation, debate, and the exchange of ideas around broadly compelling topics (e.g. Cover Songs or Teaching Dylan).  Roundtables should be proposed by a single moderator and and may include up to five participants.  The focus should be on conversation among the panelists and the audience rather than on the delivery of prepared remarks.  Roundtable proposals should include 250-word summaries of the topic to be explored along with the names and email addresses of the chair and each participant.

Deadlines:

Sept 1               Submission Portal Opens

Jan 15              Paper, Panel, and Roundtable Submission Deadline

Feb 1                Registration Opens

Feb 15              Notification

For updates, please visit our website at: https://dylan.utulsa.edu/world-bob-dylan-symposium/

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/142550896607959/

 

Notated Music in the Digital Sphere: Possibilities and Limitations

Welcome to this one-day seminar to be held at the National Library of Norway, Oslo, on the 25th October 2018.

In the last couple of decades, digital humanities has evolved, giving different research fields new angles and new tools. Integrating technology and using digital resources in the humanities makes it possible to conduct research in new ways and give us new understanding of the humanities as a field.

For notated music, however, the development seems somewhat slower regarding digital research. Compared to text or sound, being more a kind of «vessel» for the composer’s intentions, notated music seems to fall between categories in the digital humanities.

This one-day seminar aims to investigate the digital possibilities and limitations for notated music in the sphere of digital humanities, and look further into areas and digital opportunities relevant for libraries, archives and music collections. The speakers are researchers each specialized within different fields of notated music in a digital setting.

 

Speakers:

Andrew Hankinson (Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford)

Julia Craig-McFeely (Faculty of Music, University of Oxford)

Axel Teich Geertinger (Danish Centre for Music Editing, Royal Danish Library)

Olivier Lartillot (Departement of Musicology, University of Oslo)

Jøran Rudi (Norwegian Center for Technology in Music and the Arts – NOTAM)

Jennifer Ward (Répertoire International des Sources Musicales)

Bjarke Moe (Society for Danish Language and Literature)

 

Moderator: Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music)

 

Registration: https://response.questback.com/nasjonalbiblioteket/musicinthedigitalsphere

 

Full programme: https://www.nb.no/hva-skjer/notated-music-in-the-digital-sphere/