Popular songs in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

LUCCA, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

30 November – 2 December 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Popular songs in the 19th Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 30 November to 2 December 2019.

Even if its manifestation differs within the cultural areas in which it appears, the vogue of “popular song” seems to become a transnational phenomenon around the years 1820-1830. Following a period of political affirmation and education via the use of songs (during the French Revolution), this repertoire draws on traditional songs that, although often older (sometimes as old as the fifteenth century), are revived. The political and esthetic purposes of these productions remain to be investigated on a european scale.

The aim of this conference is multifaceted: from the investigation of the history of the nineteenth-century song from the beginning of the century up to the First World War, through evaluation and assessment of the repertoire, of the public and of the performance venues, to the isolation and identification of points of contact between different cultures from a global geographical perspective (Francophone, English-speaking, German, Italian, Spanish).

The possible answers to the essential question ‘What is popular song?’ acquire a central role in this context, since they concern not only its physical manifestations–the circumstances and places of performance of this repertoire–but also its meaning and significance: how the repertoire itself reflects the society of its origins.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The Definition of “Popular Song” in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Literary Sources of the Repertoire
  • Musical Influences on the Repertoire
  • The Different Genres of Popular Song
  • Authors, Performers and Public
  • The Types of Entertainment Venues
  • The Production System of the Song in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Geography of the Song in Urban Spaces
  • Dissemination Through Editions, Press, etc.
  • The Cultural and Social Role of Popular Song

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Derek Scott (University of Leeds)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 28 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the half of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Leopold Mozart and Life in the Age of Enlightenment

Call for Papers

The Academy for Mozart Research of the Mozarteum Foundation Salzburg plans an international conference in Salzburg from 4 to 6 April 2019. The theme of the conference is

Leopold Mozart und die Lebenswelt der Aufklärung

Gesellschaft – Bildung – Kultur

Leopold Mozart and Life in the Age of Enlightenment

Society – Education – Culture.

The conference is also open to all current topics of Mozart Research. Conference papers will be published in the Mozart-Jahrbuch.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words in any of the conference languages (German, English, Italian, and French), a short CV, and contact details should be sent by 30 November 2018

– by mail to: conference@mozarteum.at

– or by post to: Akademie für Mozart-Forschung, Stiftung Mozarteum Salzburg, Schwarzstraße 26, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria

A decision on acceptance will be made by the end of December 2018.

Auditors are welcome to all paper sessions at no charge; please register in advance at conference@mozarteum.at.

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Konrad

Chair, Academy for Mozart Research

Music Patronage in Italy from the 15th- to the 18th- Century

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music Patronage in Italy from the 15th- to the 18th- Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 16 to 18 November 2019.
During the Renaissance and throughout the Baroque and Classical periods, musical production is linked to patronage. Predominantly in the courts – ecclesiastical or secular – the ‘patron’ is a rich person, usually noble, who offers protection and money in exchange for a service. The musician s work on commission, in keeping with the requests of their patrons. Although the artists of the referred period managed to express themselves in works of excellent craftsmanship , it is undeniable that the system repressed or at least channelled their creativity. There is in fact a master-servant relationship between patrons and salaried workers and, although the exposure to each other was close and often collaborative, it is inappropriate to think of an equal relationship.
There are essentially two types of patronage. The first relates to political institutions, to public life, and aims to promote musical events that highlight the wealth and power of the patron in the eyes of rival courts and subjects – hence the birth of the court chapels. The second type belongs to the private sphere, in which the patron, of noble birth and as such in possession of high moral and intellectual virtues, possesses a discriminating artistic sensibility — hence the promotion of chamber music activities, the collecting of rare and valuable musical instruments, and the compilation and collection of musical manuscripts, possibly in deluxe or personalized copies .
This musical production system, as described, lasted until the middle of the nineteenth century, when the advent of capitalism and the rise of the bourgeois class caused the decline of patronage. Musical activity then began to obey the laws of the marketplace, with substantial repercussions on the social status of the musician and his work.
This conference focuses on the various aspects of music patronage in Italy from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

– Patronage and institutions
– The private sphere of patronage
– Music Patronage and the Church
– Patronage and musical genres
– Patronage and censorship
– The patronage system and the social status of the musician
– Patronage and musical print
– Patronage and manuscript production
– Patronage and musical collecting

Programme Committee: 
• Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynotes Speakers:
Iain Fenlon (University of Cambridge)
Reinhard Strohm (University of Oxford)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 14 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
http://www.luigiboccherini.org

BFE/RMA Research Students’ Conference Call for Papers extended deadline

10-12 January 2019

University of Sheffield

Exended deadline: 9am Monday 12 November 2018.
 
 

Keynotes:

Laudan Nooshin (City, University of London)

Yvonne Liao (University of Oxford)

 

Call for Proposals

The Department of Music at the University of Sheffield is delighted to host the 2019 British Forum for Ethnomusicology and Royal Musical Association Research Students’ Conference. We welcome UK and international postgraduates to present their research and creative practice in an inclusive, friendly, and supportive atmosphere. The conference will also include training and careers workshops, informal performance opportunities, and a variety of social and networking events.

We welcome both traditional and innovative formats for presentations relating to any areas of musical research, including composition, audiovisual media, performance, and/or other creative practices, as well as musicology, ethnomusicology, music psychology, and research that cuts across (sub-)disciplinary boundaries. Presentations should be 20 minutes in length, and will be followed by an additional 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Alternatively, papers can be proposed for a shorter ‘lightning’ format, allowing 5 minutes and one slide.

We also welcome proposals for posters, which optionally can be linked to a paper in either conventional or ‘lightning’ format.

Proposals responding to this general call should be sent to bferma2019@sheffield.ac.uk by 9am Monday 12 November 2018.

Proposals should include:

  • your name

  • email address

  • affiliation

  • title of your presentation

  • abstract of no more than 250 words

Please make any unusual space, format, or equipment requirements clear in addition to your abstract.

Alongside this general invitation, we encourage proposals in several themed strands, including acoustic and electroacoustic composition, performance, and software or hardware demonstration, details of which can be found in the full CfP on the conference website:

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/research/conferences/bfe_2019

https://goldenpages.jpehs.co.uk/2018/04/30/bfe-rma-research-students-conference/

Music and Materialisms: A Free One-day Conference

Saturday 23rd February 2019,

Visconti Studio, Kingston University

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Eric Clarke (University of Oxford)

D/L FOR PROPOSALS: 10 DECEMBER 2018

RESERVE FREE TICKETS HERE

We are delighted to announced a call for proposals for one day conference discussing issues surrounding music and materialisms. The conference will be held at the Visconti Studio at Kingston University on Saturday 23rd February. A full version of the call, including detailed submission instructions can be read online here.

INFO:

This transhistorical conference seeks to draw together scholars interested in using such frameworks to challenge existent ontologies of sound and sound-making. The conference organisers are particularly interested in contributions relating to music and materialism as relating to the following themes:

Power: Material inscriptions of power; The foregrounding or loss of questions about power/inequalities in different materialist approaches; Politics of making; feminist and queer materialisms; Forms of organisation;

Bodies: The body in performance and reception; The place of the senses (beyond hearing); Affect; Materiality of performative acts; Explorations of bodies/genders in performance; Embodiment and materiality limits; Interfaces; Touch and materiality;

Notation: Role of the score as a “script” for performance; Material indeterminacy; Participatory music-making and politics of performance; The score as a material object; New notational approaches;

Histories: The history of material objects; Historical dimensions of materialist theories themselves – why materialisms, and why now? Is it possible to conceive of history without a place for materiality?;

Culture: Organology; Museology; Curatorial practices; Analysis of physical objects and social meanings; Imagery; Mediation of material objects in practices of production; Dissemination; Consumption; Simulation; computational technology and non-parametric notions of making;

Ontology: Beyond representationism; Non-repeatability; Actuality of musical sound vs. nothingness; Post-sapien/post-humanism; Notions of flux; Indeterminacy,

The conference organisers welcome proposals for contributions in a variety of formats. Papers (20 minutes), artistic reports, performances, lecture-recitals, and interactive demonstrations (along with other formats of the proposer’s devising) are all welcome.

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: 10 DECEMBER 2019.

Successful applicants will be notified by 11 January 2019

If you wish to attend, please reserve your free ticket asap via EventBrite here. Please direct all other enquiries to musicandmaterialism@gmail.com

Regards,

Prof. Isabella van Elferen, Kingston University

Dr Matthew Sergeant, Bath Spa University

Dr Samuel Wilson, Guildhall School of Music and Drama

Conference Organisers

Nordic Music RMA Study Day

University of York, Dept. of Music, 29th April 2019

Contributions from Postgraduate Students especially welcome

Call for submissions:

The Department of Music, University of York invites proposals for 20-minute papers as part of a study day on Nordic music. The music from these regions has attracted a significant amount of scholarly attention in recent years and is continuing to grow. Furthermore, research in this area has become increasingly heterogeneous. This diversity means there is an international community of researchers who are approaching this music from necessarily different angles.

To embrace this range of approaches, the programme committee welcomes papers on any aspect of Nordic music. Submissions are especially encouraged from postgraduate researchers, as well as established academics. Proposals might address, but not in any way be limited to, the following areas of music from Northern Europe:

  • National identity
  • Musical modernism and Postmodernism
  • The relationship between music and Nordic environments (both natural and cultural)
  • Approaches to composition
  • Approaches to musical performance
  • Analytical approaches
  • Impacts on music theory
  • Cross-relationships between “contemporary classical” music and “popular” music in the Nordic countries.

How to submit:

Please email proposals for 20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) to Owen Burton (ob703@york.ac.uk) with the following information:

  • Name and affiliation
  • Contact email
  • Presentation title
  • Abstract of no more than 250 words
  • Short biography of no more than 50 words.

Submission deadline for proposals:

1st March 2019

Programme committee:

Owen Burton, Prof. Tim Howell, Dr Richard Powell, Claire McGinn.

Song, Stage and Screen XIV

Call for Papers – Deadline: Sunday 9 December 2018

(Re-)Inventions: Adaptations and New Directions in Musicals on and between Stage and Screen

University of Leeds School of Music
and School of Performance and Cultural Industries
26-29 June 2019

Musicals on stage and screen continue to take novel and diverse forms, sometimes challenging the apparent boundaries and established understanding of what a musical is. Adaptation is often at the centre of new works, whether in the form of the subject matter – be that Hamilton’s interpretation of American history, or the adaptation of personal lives at the core of Fun Home and The Greatest Showman – or the process of creation – from stage to screen or, in increasing numbers, screen to stage. Indeed, there is a trend in the latter category of making stage musicals out of non-musical films that appears to be on the rise.

This conference explores all aspects of adaptation and new directions in stage and screen musicals, to considering how (re-)invention is changing what musicals are, and how they are created, produced, consumed and engaged with. As such, contributors are encouraged to interpret ‘musical theatre’ as a broad term encompassing musicals for, on and between stage, screen and beyond.

Topics for papers and presentations may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Adapting from, to and between page, stage, screen and real life
  • Defining the musical and musical theatre
  • New musical theatre
  • Diversity and gender in musical theatre
  • Verbatim musical theatre
  • Directing musical theatre
  • Audience engagement and musical theatre
  • Funding new musical theatre

Abstracts of no more than 200 words (PDF files, without your name or affiliation) for papers of no more than 20 minutes should be sent by Sunday 9 December 2018 to i.p.sapiro@leeds.ac.uk (subject line: SSS XIV) for blind review by our international program committee. Prospective participants will be notified by the end of January 2019.

“Song, Stage and Screen” is the official conference of Studies in Musical Theatre (https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=119/), and has been held annually in international locations since 2006.

Italian Musical Migration to the British Isles, 1700-1950

CALL FOR PAPERS – DEADLINE 10 DECEMBER 2018

‘ITALIAN MUSICAL MIGRATION TO THE BRITISH ISLES, 1700-1950’
University of Birmingham, 10 April 2019

academia.edu/37647753/Italian_Musical_Migration_to_the_British_Isles_Birmingham_April_19_CFP

The study of migration and mobilities is crucial to the modern histories of Britain and Italy, and especially their complex artistic exchanges. This one-day conference will shed light on this interdisciplinary field of investigation by focusing on Italianmusical migration to the British Isles from the eighteenth century to the Second World War. It aims to provide a new critical overview of the diffusion of Italiansinging culture and instrumental music in British theatres and concert halls, the migration of Italian-born musical professionals and entrepreneurs to the British Isles, and the publication of Italian scores by British publishers. The long time period will help to create a sense of the profound impact of these musical transfers and networks on British politics and society, on the institutionalisation of national and regional identities in modern Europe, and on the development of Italian cultural diplomacy and colonialism following the Unification (1861).

Potential topics include:
• The biographical and professional trajectories of Italian-born singers, composers, performers, virtuosos, impresarios, librettists, stage designers, conductors, prompters, and street musicians active in the British Isles from 1700 to 1950, and their impact on local policies and institutions.
• The diffusion and reception of Italian music in British theatres and concert halls and the activities of Italian opera companies and musical associations in the British Isles.
• British musicians and artists trained or educated in Italy.
• The circulation of Italian music-related goods, items, instruments and tools.
• Patterns of mobility, routes of travel, networks and Anglo-Italian cultural transfers from a transnational perspective. This may include reflection on issues of territory, borders, national and regional identities, gender, religion, cultural diplomacy and colonialism.
• The relation between the Italian musical migration to the British Isles and the first Italian diaspora as a mass and global phenomenon, especially in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This could also involve comparison with different artistic migrations from Italy (e.g. to different countries or continents in the same epoch).

Abstracts for 20-minute papers (max 300 words) and short biographies (max 150 words) should be sent to italianmigration2019@gmail.com by Monday 10 December 2018. Interdisciplinary approaches and paper proposals from early career researchers would be particularly welcome. The programme committee will communicate its decisions by Monday 14 January 2019.

The conference will be free to attend. A small number of travel and accommodation bursaries, generously provided by the Institute of Musical Research, will be available to doctoral candidates, early career researchers and independent scholars who cannot obtain institutional support. Potential recipients should send a short statement giving their rationale.

INVITED SPEAKERS:
Susan Rutherford (University of Manchester), Alexandra Wilson (Oxford Brookes University), Flora Willson (King’s College London)

CONVENERS:
Nicolò Palazzetti and Ben Earle

PROGRAMME COMMITTEE:
Ben Earle (University of Birmingham), Matthew Gardner (University of Tübingen), Federica Nardacci (Royal College of Music), Nicolò Palazzetti (University of Birmingham), Rupert Ridgewell (British Library), Amelie Roper (British Library).

——
Contact:
Dr Nicolò Palazzetti (University of Birmingham/Institute of Musical Research)
nicolo.palazzetti@hotmail.it
birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/music/palazzetti-nicolo.aspx

Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

18-20 October 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Veniceare pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19thCentury», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 18 to 20 October 2019.

It is only in recent years that musicology has seriously begun to focus on opera staging, representing as it does a crucial element in our understanding of theatrical production. The visual component is integral to the compositional process of opera; it is already present in the stage directions contained in scene booklets and scores, before finding its ultimate form in the most comprehensive examples of stage-booklets. Cross-comparison of these books with the score, sets, costumes and press reports, often accompanied by illustrations and photographs of the scenery, can now generate an understanding of the ‘three-dimensionality’ of a particular opera.

The present conference aims to address several facets of the artistic expression of a live performance, in particular focusing on the technical issues, people and institutions related to it. Thus dance, musical theatre, mime, puppetry, and other performing arts will be investigated through the lens of their various components— staging, lighting, sound, costumes, theatrical machines — as well as their protagonists — impresarios, tournée, companies, designers, conductors and directors.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • Stage Machinery: Scene Changes, Lighting, Sound Effects, Set, Illusions, etc.
  • Economical and Administrative Issues
  • Companies and Tournées
  • Stage Direction, Movements and Gestures
  • Impresarios, Actors, Dancers, Designers, Conductors, etc.
  • Mime, Puppetry, Dance and Choreography
  • The Venues of Entertainment
  • Press, Staging Manuals, Literature and Handbooks

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Scott Palmer (School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds)
  • Catrina Flint (Vanier College, Montréal).

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 7 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Listening Experience Database one-day conference: Digital methodologies for understanding musical experience

 

21 November 2018, 9.30-16.30
School of Advanced Study, University of London

Speakers include Jane Winters, David de Roure and Tim Crawford.  

The event is free, but please register via Eventbrite, where you will find the full programme.

The AHRC-funded Listening Experience Database (LED) Project (https://led.kmi.open.ac.uk/) is collating people’s private experiences of listening to music. Exploring a wide variety of sources, the project has collected over 10,000 unique experiences into its database. This data is open for consumption by software applications and by people, and it is published using the open standards of Linked Data, such as RDF for representation and SPARQL for querying (available at https://led.kmi.open.ac.uk/linkeddata/).

The LED project is focusing on approaches to generating new and innovative methods of visualising the data within the LED database, and the event will include presentations on several aspects of innovative approaches of exploring musical data at scale, and the supporting infrastructures this research requires:  can music accomplish the levels of access and ease of discovery and retrieval which can be taken for granted in text-based digital disciplines? What are the collaborations and developments that are required to foster this?