Church Music and Musicians in Britain 1660-1900: “Between the Chapel and the Tavern”

A Conference sponsored jointly by Canterbury Christ Church University and Canterbury Cathedral for performers and scholars to discuss new research and practice.

20th-23rd June 2017

Call for Papers

The deadline for receipt of abstracts (see below) is Monday 31 October 2016; selection will be made by Monday 28th November 2016.

All presentations must be given in English. The programme committee invites proposals related to one or more of the following key themes:

  • Music: new scholarship on composers, performers and repertoire in Britain 1660-1900.
  • Performance Practice: Music & Liturgy; vocal and instrumental forces.
  • Socio-historical perspectives: senses of identity and community; patronage, subscription, & freelance incomes; class and culture in church & cathedral music; social and musical mobility; cross-fertilisation between sacred and secular music-making.
  • Church and cathedral music in the provinces: local narratives, connections, cultures and legacies (especially Canterbury-related).
  • Aesthetics, philosophy and theology of church music 1660-1900.
  • Interdisciplinarity and performativity: liturgical music, drama and dance; singers and instrumentalists in liturgical contexts; music and sacred space.
  • Training and education: pedagogy, philosophy, function.
  • Written music: manuscript, printing, publishing and copyright studies.
  • Sacred and secular: intersections/exchanges; church music and politics; civic and sacred performances; local, national, colonial and post-colonial issues.
  • Reception: criticism, regard and neglect.

Abstracts for individual papers (of 20 minutes’ duration) of approximately 250 words should be preceded by the following information: name; institution (as appropriate); postal address; phone; email address; title.

Abstracts should be emailed to: cmmc@canterbury.ac.uk.

Conference features

  • Keynote Speaker: Prof. Rachel Cowgill, University of Huddersfield.
  • Accommodation in the International Study Centre (in the Precincts of the Cathedral).
  • Conference Dinner in the Claggett Auditorium, ISC.
  • An evening with the Canterbury Catch Club: excellent food, drink and convivial song (participation welcomed, though not compulsory) in the timbered upper room of a 15th-century local hostelry.
  • A Conference Concert reflecting the dual nature of the music and musicians under discussion in the superb chamber music space of St Gregory’s Centre for Music, CCCU, given by Cathedral musicians.
  • Free access for Conference Delegates to Cathedral, Precincts, Library, and Archives.
  • Cathedral Evensongs integrated into the Conference schedule.

Programme Committee:

  • Chris Price (co-chair): Senior Lecturer, Canterbury Christ Church University & Tenor Lay Clerk, Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Dr David Newsholme (co-chair): Assistant Organist & Director of the Cathedral Girls Choir, Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Canon Chris Irvine: Canon Librarian, Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Christopher Gower, FRCO, FCM: former Organist of Peterborough Cathedral.

Any queries should be addressed to cmmc@canterbury.ac.uk.

Music for Liturgy and Devotion in Italy around 1600

Conference, Friday 4th November and Saturday 5th November 2016,
Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama, The University of Manchester

Keynote speakers:
Daniele V. Filippi (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis)
Noel O’Regan (Edinburgh College of Art)

New deadline for proposals: 4 September 2016

The decades around the turn of the seventeenth century were marked by a new religious self-consciousness developing within the Catholic world over the course of the latter part of the sixteenth century – usually associated with the Council of Trent and the Counter-Reformation but in fact fuelled by a great diversity of intellectual and religious currents which continue to fuel discussions among historians. Italy, besides being one of the main centres of the Catholic world, was home to an extremely rich musical culture, witnessing in the time around 1600 a huge variety of musical styles designated or adapted to enhance the practice of the faith. Large-scale polychoral works for the Tridentine liturgy existed side-by-side with the more intimate genres of musica spirituale which occasionally straddled the stylistic and functional boundaries to the secular realm.

Fascinatingly diverse, this repertoire has long offered a fruitful field of research for musicologists. However, given its chronological situation in a period transgressing the traditional epochal definitions, study of this music has struggled to find a ‘home’ in the standard historiographical discourse, resulting in a perceivable lack of opportunity for researchers working in this area to communicate their knowledge. This conference aims to respond to this need and to act as a forum of exchange for scholars working on Italian liturgical and devotional music in the decades around 1600.

We welcome proposals for papers in English of 20 minutes duration or performance workshops of 30 minutes. The proposals should include the title, an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biography (approx. 100 words). The extended deadline is 4 September 2016. Applicants will be notified by 15 September.

Submissions should be emailed to italianmusic1600@manchester.ac.uk

Inquiries can be directed to Rosemarie Darby and Ginte Medzvieckaite through the contact form on the conference website www.italianmusic1600.weebly.com or using the email address given above.

Fifth Annual Meeting of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) | The Compleat Keyboardist: harpsichord, fortepiano, organ, clavichord, continuo

FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE

HISTORICAL KEYBOARD SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA (HKSNA)

21-23 MARCH 2016

Oberlin College’s Conservatory of Music (Ohio, USA) will host the fifth annual meeting of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) from Monday, 21 March, to Wednesday, 23 March 2016. The meeting’s theme “The Compleat Keyboardist: harpsichord, fortepiano, organ, clavichord, continuo” hopes to inspire us with the variety of instruments played by our forefathers and foremothers.

Three days of morning and afternoon events (Monday to Wednesday) will include papers, lecture-recitals, mini-recitals, and an exhibition of publications, recordings, and contemporary instrument makers’ work. Proposals for individual presentations or for themed sessions with multiple participants on any subject relating to historical keyboard instruments, their use and repertories from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century, are welcome.

*Of special note: Oberlin College will also host the Eighth Jurow International Harpsichord Competition during 22-24 March 2016. For more details, visit: http://historicalkeyboardsociety.org/2016-jurow-competition/.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Please submit proposals by electronic means only, via email to hksna2016@gmail.com by 30 September 2015. Individual presentations will be limited to 25 minutes. For papers and themed sessions, submit a one-page abstract attached to the e-mail as a Microsoft Word document. For mini-recitals and lecture-recitals, submit complete program information and a representative recording as an internet link or as an attached MP3 file. For performers not intending to bring their own instruments or to make arrangements to use exhibitors’ instruments, instruments will be available, based on needs for the Jurow harpsichord competition; see list below. All proposals must include short biographical statements (250 words or less) for all presenters and indicate any audio-visual/media needs.

Notification of accepted proposals will be made by 31 October 2015. Presenters must be members of HKSNA and must register for the conference. Presenters must also cover their own travel and other expenses. Further information, as it becomes available, will be posted on the website of HKSNA (www.historicalkeyboardsociety.org).

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

David Breitman
Lisa Goode Crawford
Frances Conover Fitch
Joseph Gascho
Sonia Lee
Webb Wiggins, chair

*          *          *

Below is a list of Oberlin Conservatory’s Historical Performance Program keyboard instruments; not all may be available for use in your proposal due to use in the Jurow harpsichord competition or hall availability.

French Harpsichords
Richard Kingston double, 1990
Keith Hill double, 1987
John G. P. Leek double, 1975
William Dowd double, 1969
Willard Martin single, 1979

Flemish Harpsichords
Zuckermann double after Moermans, 2007
Robert Myerly single, 1989
Willard Martin single, 1979

German Harpsichords
John Phillips double after Gräbner, 2014
William Dowd double after Mietke, 1986 (Wiggins)

Italian Harpsichords
David Sutherland, 1983
Anderson Dupree, 1982
William Dowd, 1965 (A=415/440/463)

Virginals
Edward Kottick muselar (mother & child), 2004 (A=440)
Willard Martin muselar, 1973 (A=415)
potential Owen Daly Italian, 2016 (A=463)

Chamber Organs
Gerrit Klop chamber organ, 1985 (8’ 4’ 2 2/3’ 2’ flutes, 8’ wooden principal treble only)
Robert Byrd chamber organ, 1990’s (8’ 4’ 2’ flutes)
D. A. Flentrop chamber organ, 1956

Concert Organs
D. A. Flentrop three-manual North European organ in Warner Concert Hall, 1974
C. B. Fisk three-manual late-Romantic organ in Finney Chapel, Op. 116
John Brombaugh two-manual early 17th century meantone organ in Fairchild Chapel, 1981

Clavichords
Joel Speerstra pedal and two-manual clavichord, c. 2006
Gough unfretted 5-octave clavichord, c.1964
Zuckermann “King of Sweden” fretted 4-octave clavichord, 2009

Early Pianos
Thomas & Barbara Wolf after Dulcken, Viennese, 5-octave + 2 notes (FF-g’’’), c. 1990’s
Paul McNulty after Walter, Viennese, 5-octave + 2 notes (FF-g’’’), c. 2005
Anton Zierer fortepiano, Viennese, 6 ½-octave (CC-g’’’’), c. 1829
Broadwood parlor grand piano #5418, 7-octave (85 notes), c. 1865