Opera as Institution: Networks and Professions (1700–1914)

An international conference jointly organized by the Universities of Graz and Salzburg 

November 23–24 2018
Department of Musicology, University of Graz, Meerscheinschlössl, Mozartgasse 3, A-8010 Graz

Conference BoardDaniel Brandenburg (University of Salzburg), Cristina Scuderi (University of Graz), Michael Walter (University of Graz), Ingeborg Zechner (University of Graz)

The performance of opera as musical genre demands specific institutional surroundings in order to provide the means for scenic and musical representation. Indeed operatic history, ranging from its beginnings in seventeenth-century Venice to today’s globalized opera industry, is intimately bound to the history of institutions. This conference aims to gather internationally renowned musicologists whose research focuses on the institutional histories of European opera from the eighteenth to the end of the “long nineteenth century”. The intention of the conference is not to understand operatic institutions as locally distinct and isolated organizations, but rather perceive them as part of a transnational operatic network. The specific design of the conference enables to bring historical developments and shifts into account, and will lead to a deeper understanding of transnational operatic practices throughout the centuries. In addition, it will facilitate an international scholarly exchange on a complex and multifaceted topic in music history.

Conference papers will cover French, Italian, English and German operatic institutions in Europe from the eighteenth to the “long nineteenth century” and address topics such as:

  • Production systems of French, Italian, English and German opera
  • Political, legal, economic and sociocultural surroundings influencing the institution of the opera and its international exchange
  • Professions in the business of opera (composers, singers, agents, impresari, orchestra musicians, dancers, stage designers, librettists, …)
  • Networks of exchange between operatic institutions and their protagonists

 

Participation in the conference is free of charge. For passive conference participants no advance registration is required.

For further information on the program see the conference website: http://www.institutionopera.sbg.ac.at

Principles of Music Composing: ratio versus intuitio

17th International Music Theory Conference

November 8th – 10th 2017

Vilnius, Lithuania

The aim of the annual conference ‘Principles of Music Composing’ is to foster theoretical thought that is essential for compositional practice and education of composers. Sixteen conferences of this series have already been held in Vilnius. The 17th conference draws attention to the phenomena of rationality and intuition, which are considered to be contrasting yet complementary poles in the compositional process. Intuition often alters the realization of rational scheme, model or archetype chosen by the composer. Meanwhile rational revision may improve intuitive improvisation, sonorous vision, or the artistic idea.

The topic of the conference could be divided into suggested subtopics:

  1. Rational processes of composition and aural intuition (theoretical insights, definition, conceptions, typology)
  2. Musical work as the result of rational and intuitive creative activity (theoretical, historical and aesthetical aspects)
  3. Adaptation of interdisciplinary ideas in the compositional practice based on rational and intuitive origin
  4. Rational and intuitive qualities in new musical resources and techniques (sonorism, microchromatics, extended techniques, aleatory, electronics, etc.)
  5. ‘Rational’ and ‘Intuitive’ composers: features of their works and the creative process
  6. Phenomena of rationality and intuition in the contemporary compositional practice
  7. Lithuanian composers: between rationality and intuition

Paper proposals (abstract and a short biography) should be sent by email pmc@lmta.lt . The abstract must not exceed 500 words. The duration of full presentation is limited to 20–25 minutes.

 The main language of the conference is English.

The deadline for proposal submissions is August 20th 2017. Proposals will be reviewed by the members of the scholarly committee and all applicants will be notified of the outcome in the beginning of September 2017.

The participation fee is 20 Euros.

Selected papers of the conference will be published in the annual peer reviewed scientific journal ‘Principles of Music Composing’.

pmc.lmta.lt 

Church Music and Musicians in Britain 1660-1900: “Between the Chapel and the Tavern”

A Conference sponsored jointly by Canterbury Christ Church University and Canterbury Cathedral for performers and scholars to discuss new research and practice.

20th-23rd June 2017

Call for Papers

The deadline for receipt of abstracts (see below) is Monday 31 October 2016; selection will be made by Monday 28th November 2016.

All presentations must be given in English. The programme committee invites proposals related to one or more of the following key themes:

  • Music: new scholarship on composers, performers and repertoire in Britain 1660-1900.
  • Performance Practice: Music & Liturgy; vocal and instrumental forces.
  • Socio-historical perspectives: senses of identity and community; patronage, subscription, & freelance incomes; class and culture in church & cathedral music; social and musical mobility; cross-fertilisation between sacred and secular music-making.
  • Church and cathedral music in the provinces: local narratives, connections, cultures and legacies (especially Canterbury-related).
  • Aesthetics, philosophy and theology of church music 1660-1900.
  • Interdisciplinarity and performativity: liturgical music, drama and dance; singers and instrumentalists in liturgical contexts; music and sacred space.
  • Training and education: pedagogy, philosophy, function.
  • Written music: manuscript, printing, publishing and copyright studies.
  • Sacred and secular: intersections/exchanges; church music and politics; civic and sacred performances; local, national, colonial and post-colonial issues.
  • Reception: criticism, regard and neglect.

Abstracts for individual papers (of 20 minutes’ duration) of approximately 250 words should be preceded by the following information: name; institution (as appropriate); postal address; phone; email address; title.

Abstracts should be emailed to: cmmc@canterbury.ac.uk.

Conference features

  • Keynote Speaker: Prof. Rachel Cowgill, University of Huddersfield.
  • Accommodation in the International Study Centre (in the Precincts of the Cathedral).
  • Conference Dinner in the Claggett Auditorium, ISC.
  • An evening with the Canterbury Catch Club: excellent food, drink and convivial song (participation welcomed, though not compulsory) in the timbered upper room of a 15th-century local hostelry.
  • A Conference Concert reflecting the dual nature of the music and musicians under discussion in the superb chamber music space of St Gregory’s Centre for Music, CCCU, given by Cathedral musicians.
  • Free access for Conference Delegates to Cathedral, Precincts, Library, and Archives.
  • Cathedral Evensongs integrated into the Conference schedule.

Programme Committee:

  • Chris Price (co-chair): Senior Lecturer, Canterbury Christ Church University & Tenor Lay Clerk, Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Dr David Newsholme (co-chair): Assistant Organist & Director of the Cathedral Girls Choir, Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Canon Chris Irvine: Canon Librarian, Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Christopher Gower, FRCO, FCM: former Organist of Peterborough Cathedral.

Any queries should be addressed to cmmc@canterbury.ac.uk.

Instrument of Change: The International Rise of the Guitar (c.1870-1945)

Friday 9 – Sunday 11 December 2016
Melbourne Conservatorium of Music

The University of Melbourne, Australia

http://mcm.unimelb.edu.au/instrumentofchange

The rise and international dissemination of the modern guitar can be dated to the decades around the turn of the 20th century, when the instrument took on a variety of forms and became associated with a range of playing styles and music genres. This conference will explore the contexts and trajectories of the guitar during this dynamic period, which pre-dated its global proliferation as a popular music icon in the second half of the 20th century.

Keynote speakers for the conference will include:
Prof. Walter Clark (University of California, Riverside); Prof. Kevin Dawe (University of Kent); Dr Melanie Plesch (University of Melbourne); Prof. John Whiteoak (Monash University)

The call for papers has now closed. Thank you to everyone who submitted a proposal. Paper-givers will be notified by early August, but if you need earlier notification, please notify Dr Michael Christoforidis.

  • A provisional program will be posted on the conference website by early October.
  • Registration is free, but bookings will open on Monday 17 October (a link will be provided on the conference website for further information).

19th Biennial International Nineteenth-Century Music Conference

19th Biennial International Nineteenth-Century Music Conference
Faculty of Music, University of Oxford
11-13 July 2016

Book here:

 

Registration fees:
Concessionary rates are available to students, unwaged and retired delegates.

– Standard 3-day registration fee – £100.00
– Concessionary 3-day registration fee – £70.00
– Standard 1-day registration fee – £45.00 per day
– Concessionary 1-day registration fee – £25.00 per day
– 3-course conference dinner at Merton College, Tuesday 12th July – £50.00

Accommodation Information:
– College and city accommodation available, see website for details.

Keynote speakers:
Professor Daniel Chua (University of Hong Kong)
Professor Jessica Gienow-Hecht (Freie Universität Berlin)

Conference programme:
– A draft can be downloaded from the website.

Conference committee:
– Philip Bullock, Barbara Eichner, Daniel Grimley, Anna Stoll Knecht, Laura Tunbridge, Benjamin Walton


Faculty of Music, University of Oxford
St Aldate’s
Oxford
OX1 1DB

Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century

International Conference.  Corfu, Greece, 17-19 November 2017

2017 marks for opera in Greece four anniversaries: the centenary since the passing of Spiros Samaras (1861-1917), the bicentenary since the birth of two important Greek opera composers, Spiridon Xyndas (1817-1896) and Domenikos Padovas (1817-1892), as well as the 150 years since the premiere of the opera O ypopsifios [The Parliamentary Candidate] (1867, music by Xyndas and libretto by Ioannis Rinopoulos), which was both the first full-scale opera in Greek and the pivotal point for the emergence of opera in Greek language.

The Hellenic Music Research Lab of the Music Department of the Ionian University and Corfu Philharmonic Society on the occasion of the aforementioned anniversaries organize the international conference entitled Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century, which is going to take place in Corfu, Greece, on 17, 18 and 19 November 2017.

Corfu, the seat of the Ionian University, was the birthplace of the three aforementioned composers. The San Giacomo theatre of Corfu, the earliest theatrical stage of the region, hosted opera performances already since 1733, contributing decisively to the dissemination of opera within the Greek world during 19th century. Moreover, Xyndas, Padovas and Samaras presented in the same theatre their operas. Xyndas in 1840 was also one of the initial founders and professors of the Corfu Philharmonic Society and he dedicated to it certain of his operas. Padovas also taught harmony and music theory in the Philharmonic, in 1857 he dedicated to it his opera Dirce and since 1884 he was appointed the Society’s artistic director. Samaras, a student of Xyndas during his early music training, had multiple connections with the Philharmonic Society and had been its honorary artistic director since 1889.

Given the above, the conference will not be confined solely to the lives and the works of the aforementioned composers, but it will focus on matters regarding the place, the reception, the importance and the formative factors of the operatic activity within the Greek world during the “long nineteenth century”. With these in mind, some indicative themes of the conference are proposed to be;

  • Spiros Samaras: life and work
  • Spiridon Xindas: life and work
  • Domenikos Padovas: life and work
  • The activities of the Italian opera troupes in the Greek areas (singers, musicians, impresarios, repertory etc)
  • The activities of the French opera troupes in the Greek areas
  • The activities of the Greek opera troupes
  • Opera in the Greek communities of Diaspora (Trieste, Odessa, Alexandria, Smyrna, Constantinople etc)
  • Opera in the Greek urban centres
  • Institutions of operatic activity
  • The reception of opera in the Greek world
  • Subjects related to Greece in the 19th-century opera

The official languages of the opera are GreekItalian and English.

Scholars and researchers interested to participate in the conference are asked to submit their abstracts (250 words) and short biographical notes (100 words) for papers of no more than 20 minutes. Themed sessions of 60 minutes can also be proposed (Abstract of 450 words and Bios of 100 words).

There are no fees for the participation or the attendance of the conference.

The final date for the proposals’ submission is 31 December 2016.

The abstracts and the biographical notes should be sent until the above date in the following email: operaconfcorfu2017@gmail.com
The Official website of the conference is: http://users.ionio.gr/~GreekMus/operaconf2017/eng.htm
The conference’s programme will be finalized by 1 March 2017.

Programme Committee
Prof. Haris Xanthoudakis
Prof. Anastasia Siopsi
A. Prof. Panos Vlagopoulos
A. Professor Avra Xapapadakou

Organizing Committee
Spiridon Padovas
Kostas Kardamis
Kostas Sambanis
Stella Kourbana
Alexandros Charkiolakis
Gerasimos Martinis

MVSA Conference April 2016 – Victorian News: Print Culture and the Periodical Press

The Midwest Victorian Studies Association will hold its 2016 annual conference at the University of Missouri–Columbia, April 8-10. Taking as its starting point the remarkable explosion in the periodical press and the availability of cheap print in the Victorian Era, the conference aims to attract papers that reflect fresh and current thinking about the topic. Proposals for papers of twenty minutes in length are sought from scholars working in art history, musicology, history, science, philosophy, theater, and literature. We particularly encourage presentations that will contribute to cross-disciplinary discussion, a special feature of MVSA conferences.

The official call for papers is now closed, but the seminar CFP has been extended to January 20, 2016.  MVSA Conference seminars are open to graduate students, faculty and independent scholars.  Participants will write 5-7-page papers, to be pre-circulated among other seminar participants in advance.  Members will identify important points of intersection and divergence, as well as future areas of inquiry and collaboration.  The seminar format allows a larger number of scholars to participate in MVSA and to seek financial support from their respective institutions.  Seminars are limited to 12 participants.  All seminar proposals should be submitted via email directly to the seminar leaders by January 20, 2016.  See the full seminar CFP here.

The three seminar topics and leaders are:

Print Culture and the Mass Public: Dissemination and Democratization (Leader, Julie Codell, School of Art, Arizona State University)

Finding/Creating a Voice in the Periodical Press (Leader, Leanne Langley, IMR Lifetime Fellow, University of London)

The Transatlantic Periodical Press (Leader, Jennifer Phegley, Department of English, University of Missouri – Kansas City)

For further information, including a range of possible topics across the full conference, see the 2016 Conference website here.

 

 

 

 

 

Liturgical Organ Music and Liturgical Organ Playing in the Long 19th Century

January 20–22, 2016

Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland

INVITATION

The Department of Church Music and the DocMus Doctoral School at the Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki, invite organists, researchers, and students to take part in the conference ”Liturgical Organ Music and Liturgical Organ Playing in the Long 19th Century”, a period extending approximately from the French Revolution to the First World War.

The long 19th century was an era of transition, paradoxes, and conflict in the area of church music. While suffering from the continuing decline in the position of the church and the organ in musical life – a process well under way already in the latter half of the previous century – it also saw the birth of several reform movements relating to liturgy, organ and church music, movements that not only shaped much of the developments in the following century but also have had significant repercussions on present-day practices.

Since the long 19th century has been, until recently, largely neglected in liturgical-musical studies, probably because of its lingering association with “decadence” -inherited from 20th century reformists – we feel that it is now time for a thorough reassessment. It is our hope that the conference ”Liturgical Organ Music and Liturgical Organ Playing in the Long 19th Century” will significantly contribute to this purpose.

The conference offers a varied programme, with presentations in words and music in different formats, in addition to, among other things, reconstructed historical services and a concert with Scandinavian congregational hymns.

Invited keynote speakers include:

Prof. Dr. Michael Heinemann, Hochschule für Musik Carl Maria von Weber Dresden

Dr. Kurt Lueders, Paris

 

The conference language is English.

Organizing Committee:

Professor Peter Peitsalo (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)

Professor Sverker Jullander (Luleå University of Technology)

Professor Karin Nelson (Norwegian Academy of Music)

Lecturer Pekka Suikkanen (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)

Dr Per Högberg (University of Gothenburg)

Coordinator of Doctoral Studies Markus Kuikka (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)

MA, MMus Martti Laitinen (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)

 

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Proposals are invited for papers (20 minutes presentation + 10 minutes discussion), lecture-recitals (40 minutes + 15 minutes discussion) and panel sessions (50 minutes). Topics as they relate to the main themes of the conference include, but will not be limited to:

  • purposes of organ playing in liturgy
  • dissemination of repertoire and stylistic ideals through printed collections of liturgical organ music
  • transnational and interdenominational influences
  • liturgical organ music as expression of national identity
  • folk music influences
  • liturgical organ playing as expression of power
  • performance practice issues: hymn playing, plainchant accompaniment, the impact of different organ types
  • forms, functions and models of liturgical organ improvisation
  • church music reform movements, the Bach revival, historical models, changes in liturgical ideals
  • echoes of liturgical organ practice in non-liturgical music
  • comments on liturgical organ playing in the writings of philosophers, theologians, and ecclesiastical authorities as well as in fiction
  • musical representations of aesthetic concepts such as transcendence and the sublime
  • implications of 19th century practices for today’s liturgy and liturgical organ playing.

Proposal writers are encouraged to focus on continuities, transitional phases, and processes of change in Protestant and Roman Catholic church music, as well as Nordic aspects.

Presentations will be held in the Organo Hall of the Helsinki Music Centre (www.musiikkitalo.fi/en/spaces/organo), which has three organs (www2.siba.fi/organo): one by Forster & Andrews from 1892 (III+P/29); one by Verschueren from 1994, built along the lines of North German and Dutch baroque tradition (II+P/26); and one by an unknown Italian builder from the 18th century (I/9). In addition, historical organs in nearby churches will be used during the conference, e.g., the main organ of the St. John’s Church (Johanneksenkirkko, Johanneskyrkan), built by E. F. Walcker & Co in 1891 and restored by Christian Scheffler in 2005 (III+P/66).

All proposals must include the following:

  1. an abstract of maximum 500 words, including information on the type of presentation proposed
  2. a short CV with contact information (for panel sessions, CVs for all panel members, and for lecture-recitals, CVs for all participating musicians, are required
  3. In addition, proposals for lecture-recitals must include: a detailed programme for the music to be performed (composers, work titles, composition years, opus numbers or equivalent)

Please, fill in the online submission form at the conference website and submit it as instructed. The submission time is April 10 – June 5, 2015.

All who submit proposals will be notified of the committee’s decision on acceptance by July 1, 2015.

For further information, please contact:

Peter Peitsalo, DMus, Professor, peter.peitsalo(at)uniarts.fi

Markus Kuikka, DMus, Coordinator, markus.kuikka(at)uniarts.fi

website: http://sites.siba.fi/en/web/organ-and-mass-communication/home

What does democracy sound like? Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

International Conference, 5th-7th November 2015, Philharmonie de Paris

Partners:
L’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris (Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage & Centre Georg Simmel); Centre Marc Bloch Berlin; Palazzetto Bru Zane Venice; Center for Worldmusic Hildesheim; Philharmonie de Paris

With the question ‘What does democracy sound like?’, this jointly organised German-French conference intends to open up a space for discussing conceptions and potential functions of music within democratic societies. In research, relations between music and politics were especially closely intertwined thought in official representations of feudal societies and in the context of the ideological instrumentalization of music in totalitarian regimes. Considering this, it appears that the relationship between music and politics can carry dangerous, or at least problematic implications. This relationship seems to be also difficult with regard to the (unquestioned) necessity of autonomy and the principle of artistic freedom. In contrast to this stands the positive power of music, as represented by its potential for use in resistance, protest and liberation movements and its mobilization within processes of community and identity building. Instead of viewing these differing perspectives as contradictory, this conference aims to consider them as an expression of the complexity of the relationships between musical practices and diverse conceptions of collective action and social groupings.

In both historical and anthropological approaches, various forms of musical practices, discourses and social groupings (state, regional and local communities, clubs and interest groups etc.) within democratic societies come into consideration here:

How can it, for example, be explained that music often acts as a means of representing a society as being free and equal, i.e. as a medium for the shaping of society? What prerequisites and intentions underlie the understanding of music as social ‘common property’? In how far are different actors/experts (researchers, members of various interest groups or also militant associations) involved in the process of legitimating state intervention in various musical spheres (artistic production, mediation, education, construction of musical spaces)? Also to be discussed are terms such as ‘culture’, ‘music’, ‘society’, ‘the people’ etc., which struggle for definitionwithin the continualinterplay of societal legitimation and contradiction. Musical practice, when viewed in relation to the term ‘democracy’–which shouldalso be problematized with regardtoits social and political processes of mediation – demands an openness of approach. Indeed, the term ‘democracy’ is instinctively connected to unifying societal ideals and political norms, yet the practical implementation of this concept clearly varies according to time and place.

In order to bring this variation to attention, the conference will take on a longue duréeperspective and trace ideas of democratic thinking in music – with its continuities and gaps – from its first appearance (late 18th/early 19th century) up to the present day. The examples of France and Germany can be taken as a starting point but the focus should by no means be restricted to them. Rather, points of reference between different countries and cultural contexts should be drawn upon and produced.

On the basis of these initial questions, contributions to one or more of the following key areas are welcome:

Music and State: music-related cultural and educational policies; debates on societal representation and participation; institutionalization processes; etc.

History of Ideas: historical milestones in the development of concepts of ‘music and democracy’; processes of mobilization and stabilization as well as controversies surrounding related concepts (musical autonomy, representation, cultural diversity, etc.); the construction of musical hierarchies and genres; etc.

Creativity and Politics: debates on the definition and diversity of the terms ‘culture’ and ‘music’ from the viewpoint of artists (social culture, culture for everyone, etc.); conceptions of society and politics that underlie musical practices; politically motivated music; etc.

Space and Reception: construction of musical spaces and events in democratic societies (concert halls, festivals, conservatoires, radio, etc.); social and symbolic dimensions of architectonic conceptions and localizations in space; debates on social responsibility and the financing of musical spaces and events; etc.

Musical Publics: practices and contexts of listening and reception; concepts of ‘the public’ (elite, mainstream, masses, listeners, audiences, fans, etc.); means of constructing and representing the public (statistics, expert studies, market analysis, self-organization, medialization); etc.

By inviting contributions that concern themselves with various historical and geographic situations and that are orientated around different points of access to the topic (different actors, institutions, practices, discourses), the conference intends to open a forum in which the variety of perspectives on this theme can be taken into account. The aim is to consider the relationship between music and politics in all its complexities and different manifestations in democratic societies.

Contributions from a broad range of humanities and social science disciplines are welcome (History, Anthropology, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Political Sciences, Sociology, DevelopmentalStudies/Pedagogy, Theatre Studies, etc.).
The conference languages are French, German and English.

Proposals (abstract max. 2000 characters, CV max. 500 characters) should be sent by 15th May 2015 at the latest to the following address: musikdemokratie@gmail.com.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30th June 2015 and the conference programme published online at http://www.musikdemokratie.wordpress.com.
We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Members of the scientific committee:

Philip Bohlman, Esteban Buch, Annegret Fauser, Wolfgang Fuhrmann, Antoine Hennion, Denis Laborde, Karine Le Bail, Julio Mendívil, Olivier Roueff, Patrice Veit, Raimund Vogels, Sarah Zalfen, Hansjakob Ziemer

Organizers:

Talia Bachir-Loopuyt (Université Jean-Monnet), Etienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru-Zane), Christina Kaps (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Elsa Rieu (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris), Lena van der Hoven (Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung)

Napoleon’s Last Stand: Popular Reactions and State Responses to the One Hundred Days

Napoleon’s Last Stand:Popular Reactions and State Responses to the One Hundred Days

Tuesday 7 July 2015, University of Warwick, UK

Sponsored by the European History Research Centre and the AHRC-funded project ‘French Theatre of the Napoleonic Era’ at the University of Warwick.

When Napoleon escaped from Elba and landed in France in February 1815, he did so by presenting himself not as an autocrat, but as a popular hero: one who could, as Balzac later put it, ‘gain an empire simply by showing his hat! ’. In representing himself as epitomising the sovereignty of the French people, Napoleon also linked his cause to a liberal reading of the principles of the French Revolution. This representation proved unsustainable under the Allies’ rejection of his claim to power and the resumption of military conflict, but it encapsulated, in dramatic terms, the opposition between state legitimacy as a function of popular support and consent, and state legitimacy as something awarded by the autocratic decisions of the Congress of Vienna and the Courts of Europe. While by 1814, most of Europe thought the radicalism of the French Revolution had finally been contained, the 100 Days revealed the fragility of the Great Power politics that had sought to contain France as both a military and an ideological force.

This conference will explore reactions to Napoleon’s return within Europe and beyond, and examine the extent to which these reactions chimed with or departed from the behaviour of the statesmen who ordered and managed the military responses to Napoleon. What evidence is there of people across Europe identifying with Napoleon’s return? How far – and by whom – was his return perceived as a return to French revolutionary principles, as an opportunity for the adoption of such principles in other states, or as fundamentally anathema to the order, stability, and peace? While some of these questions are most applicable to Austria, Russia, Prussia, and Britain, they also have relevance for states such as the Netherlands, Ireland, Spain, Italy and Portugal: that is, those marked by revolutionary or Napoleonic experience but, by 1815, supposedly reordered by the Great Power diktat at the Congress of Vienna. And was there a wider global reaction to his return, in Egypt, the Americas, the Ottoman world, and the Balkans?

The 100 Days is usually discussed largely in military terms. The purpose of this conference is to turn attention to popular responses to this dramatic period, and to consider its implications for the self-understanding of states and peoples in the post-revolutionary European and world order. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers that engage with these issues from the perspective of cultural, social and political history, taking in sources from the spheres of literature, music, theatre and visual art as well as journalism and political commentary. Abstracts of 500 words should be emailed to 100days@warwick.ac.uk by January 31, 2015. We aim to review applications quickly and will notify applicants of our decisions by the end of February at the latest. It is envisaged that selected conference papers will be published as a collection of essays.

The conference language is English.