Principles of Music Composing: ratio versus intuitio

17th International Music Theory Conference

November 8th – 10th 2017

Vilnius, Lithuania

The aim of the annual conference ‘Principles of Music Composing’ is to foster theoretical thought that is essential for compositional practice and education of composers. Sixteen conferences of this series have already been held in Vilnius. The 17th conference draws attention to the phenomena of rationality and intuition, which are considered to be contrasting yet complementary poles in the compositional process. Intuition often alters the realization of rational scheme, model or archetype chosen by the composer. Meanwhile rational revision may improve intuitive improvisation, sonorous vision, or the artistic idea.

The topic of the conference could be divided into suggested subtopics:

  1. Rational processes of composition and aural intuition (theoretical insights, definition, conceptions, typology)
  2. Musical work as the result of rational and intuitive creative activity (theoretical, historical and aesthetical aspects)
  3. Adaptation of interdisciplinary ideas in the compositional practice based on rational and intuitive origin
  4. Rational and intuitive qualities in new musical resources and techniques (sonorism, microchromatics, extended techniques, aleatory, electronics, etc.)
  5. ‘Rational’ and ‘Intuitive’ composers: features of their works and the creative process
  6. Phenomena of rationality and intuition in the contemporary compositional practice
  7. Lithuanian composers: between rationality and intuition

Paper proposals (abstract and a short biography) should be sent by email pmc@lmta.lt . The abstract must not exceed 500 words. The duration of full presentation is limited to 20–25 minutes.

 The main language of the conference is English.

The deadline for proposal submissions is August 20th 2017. Proposals will be reviewed by the members of the scholarly committee and all applicants will be notified of the outcome in the beginning of September 2017.

The participation fee is 20 Euros.

Selected papers of the conference will be published in the annual peer reviewed scientific journal ‘Principles of Music Composing’.

pmc.lmta.lt 

‘I Am Not There’ International Conference on Bob Dylan

18-19 May 2017

Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, NOVA University of Lisbon.
Organization: CETAPS and CESEM

Call for Papers
(until 26 January 2017)

In 1999, Bob Dylan (b. 1941) was included in the ‘Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century’ as a “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize jury awarded Dylan a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, the artist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. The New York Times (13-10-2016) reported: “Mr. Dylan, 75, is the first musician to win the award, and his selection on Thursday is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901…In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honor, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels”. After the official Nobel announcement, opinions divided the public and critics. CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) and CESEM (Sociology and Musical Aesthetics Research Center), NOVA University of Lisbon, decided to analyze and celebrate the aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural significance of Bob Dylan’s musical, literary and artistic (visual) work, as well as its influence(s).
The initial expression in the conference’s title is the title of the biographical musical drama film I Am Not There (2007, directed by Todd Haynes and co-written with Oren Moverman), which intercuts the storylines of seven different Dylan-inspired characters. According to Haynes, “the minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that’s why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him – things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate” (apud D. Dalton, Who Is the Man?: In Search of the Real Bob Dylan, 2012).

We will privilege comparative and transdisciplinary approaches. Potential contributors are invited to submit a bionote and a 300 word abstract on themes related to any of the following conference tracks:

• Influences in/of Dylan’s music;
• Bob Dylan and awards;
• The ‘power’ of the Nobel prize for literature;
• The alter-egos and personas of Robert Zimmerman/Bob Dylan (Blind boy Grunt, Bob Landy, Tedham Porterhouse, etc.);
• Dylan’s music videos;
• Dylan in/as performance;
• Dylan and religion;
• Art, activism, protest, and social unrest;
• Dylan on stage – presence, performance and liveliness;
• Dylanesque spaces and places;
• Influences in/of Dylan’s visual art;
• Intertextuality in Dylan’s lyrics, music and videos (text-music relationship);
• Intermediality in musical genres and practices;
• Lyrics as/and poetry/literary narratives;
• Dylan depicted (visual biographies, photography, press and record [album] covers, official website);
• Dylan in cyberspace (myspace, facebook, youtube, etc);
• Dylan’s songs;
• Dylan as trend-setter;
• Musical style(s) in Dylan;
• Bob Dylan in the classroom;
• Adaptation of Dylan’s texts as children’s literature;
• Dylan in/and translation;
• Dylan’s fandom;
• Academia and Dylan’s fandom;
• Music as a social and political agent in Dylan’s and other composers’ production;
• Dylan, music and the moving image (cinema, documentary, television, internet);
• The roles and ideologies of musical, literary and artistic criticism: after Dylan;
• Gender and music;
• Listening to Dylan: social behaviors, musical taste, consumption patterns.

Working languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish. No translation will be provided.

Papers and panels on the above themes are invited. However, papers/panels on other subjects related to the above topics will also be considered. Participants will be held to a twenty minute presentation limit. Please submit an abstract and a bio note, by 05 January 2017, to the conference email:

bobdylanconferenceportugal@gmail.com

To ensure prompt notification, please include your e-mail address on your submission. If you are interested in chairing a session, please note this at the top of your abstract.
Registration fee: 80 euros. BA and MA students: 30 euros.

Conference website: https://internationalconferenceonbobdylanportugal2017.wordpress.com/

Coordination: Rogério Puga (CETAPS) e Paula Gomes Ribeiro (CESEM).

Music and Socialism since 1917

Conference supported by the Institute of Musical Research

7-8 July 2017, Department of Music, University of Nottingham

Keynote: Eric Drott (University of Texas at Austin)

‘Music and Socialism: Past, Present and Future’

 

 Convenor: Danijela Špirić-Beard (IMR Early Career Fellow, Royal Holloway)

Conference committee: Robert Adlington (University of Nottingham), Pauline Fairclough (University of Bristol), Elaine Kelly (The University of Edinburgh) and John Street (University of East Anglia)

Call for proposals

The rise of Occupy, Podemos, Syriza, Bernie Sanders and Corbynism for many indicates the emergence of twenty-first century socialism, but despite this renewed interest, the concept of socialism continues to receive little attention in musicological discourse. Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution, this conference will examine how music and socialism have been articulated at various historical and sociopolitical junctures, focusing on how composers and musicians have voiced their political engagement since 1917.

In contrast to the implicit radicalism of communism, socialism was initially championed as the more moderate and democratic means of effecting social change. The aim of this conference is to open up a dialogue between the creative and transformative inroads that socialism has made through music over the last hundred years, and the more adverse appropriation of music and socialist ideology by totalitarian regimes. The conference will challenge the semantic confusion over socialism and communism, and generate a more global understanding of socialism as an impulse that resonates beyond the Cold-War polarisation, and across many different cultures, societies and political systems.

The conference seeks to address (but is not limited to) the following themes:

– What constitutes socialist music?

– Rethinking Marx and critical theory

– Music, protest, democracy: between moral imperative and social action

– Composing socialism: mass communication and intellectual experimentation

– Rethinking music in the Cold War: towards socialist commonalities

– Pop and socialism

– Sounding socialism on screen

– Economy, capitalism and the music industry

– Music and postsocialism

– Music in socially engaged projects

– Social engagement or political commitment: liberals, radicals, progressives

– Socialist or social?

 

Submissions

We invite proposals for both individual papers and themed panels (3−4 speakers).

– Individual abstracts (250 words)

– Panels should include individual abstracts (250 words) and a short description of the proposed panel (200 words)

All proposals must include the title of the presentation/panel, author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), email contact, technical requirements and a short biography (100 words). Proposals should be sent as a word attachment to Danijela Špirić-Beard at Spiric-BeardD@cardiff.ac.uk

The deadline is 11 January 2017.

Applicants will be informed of the outcome by 15 February. Information about the conference (including accommodation and travel information) will be sent to all successful candidates by the end of February.

A conference fee of £35 will cover the cost of a conference pack, buffet lunch and refreshments on both days. A limited number of travel bursaries will be available to postgraduates and to early career researchers without institutional support.

A selection of authors will be invited to contribute to a multi-authored volume.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Boydell Centenary Conference

Call For Papers: Brian Boydell Centenary Conference
Friday 23 – Saturday 24 June 2017
The Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin
CFP Deadline: Friday 3 February 2017

Contact: boydell100@gmail.com

Born in Dublin in 1917, Brian Boydell was one of Ireland’s major 20th century composers. As a musicologist, he published seminal research on music in 18th century Dublin. As a broadcaster, performer, adjudicator, public lecturer, an often outspoken agitator for music, singing teacher, Professor of Music at Trinity College Dublin, one of the founders of the Music Association of Ireland and long-time member of the Arts Council, his influence on music and music education in Ireland was significant. An honorary DMus of the National University of Ireland (1974) and Fellow of the Royal Irish Academy of Music (1990), he was elected to Aosdána, the affiliation of creative artists in Ireland, in 1984.

To mark his centenary, a conference will be held on Friday 23/Saturday 24 June 2017 in The Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, with a recital of his music in the Royal Irish Academy of Music, to re-evaluate his contributions to Irish musical, artistic and academic life, and their place within the wider contexts of musical, cultural and artistic developments in Ireland in the 20th century. Confirmed speakers are Professor Barra Boydell, who will give a special address, and Peter Murray, Director of the Crawford Art Gallery Cork, who will present a guest lecture on Brian Boydell’s paintings.

Proposals are invited for the following:

  • Individual papers
  • Joint papers (maximum 2 speakers)
  • Lecture recitals
  • Themed sessions
  • Panel discussions (up to a maximum of 6 speakers)

Proposal details:

All proposals should be submitted as one file in Microsoft Word or PDF format:

Individual papers of 20 minutes in duration followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals should include:

  • title of paper
  • abstract of no more than 250 words
  • name, contact details and affiliation
  • a brief biography (max. 100 words)
  • any technical requirements

Joint papers of 20 minutes in duration followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals should include:

  • overall title of presentation and abstract (max. 150 words)
  • titles of individual papers
  • individual abstracts of no more than 250 words
  • names, contact details and affiliations
  • a brief biography for each presenter (max. 100 words)
  • any technical requirements

Lecture recitals of 30 minutes (including performance) followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals should include:

  • overall title of lecture recital and abstract/proposal of no more than 250 words
  • name(s), contact detail(s) and affiliation(s)
  • a brief biography for each presenter (max. 100 words)
  • any technical requirements

Themed sessions of 90 minutes (3 papers) or 120 minutes (4 papers) including questions and discussion, and Panel discussions of 90 minutes (up to a max. of 6 speakers, each presenting a position paper followed by questions and discussion). Proposals should include:

  • overall title of presentation and abstract/proposal (max. 250 words)
  • titles of individual papers and abstracts of no more than 250 words
  • name, contact details and affiliation of convenor
  • names, contact details and affiliations of proposed presenters
  • a brief biography for the session/panel convenor and each proposed presenter (max. 100 words each)
  • any technical requirements

Deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 3 February 2017.

All proposals should be submitted as a Microsoft Word or PDF attachment to Dr Barbara Jillian Dignam by email at boydell100@gmail.com It is envisaged that notification of the conference committee’s decision will be communicated by March 2017. A conference website will be launched shortly.

Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) Brian Boydell’s contributions under any of the following areas:

  • the re-examination and assessment of his compositions – individually and collectively – and their place within Irish music of the 20th century and the wider context
  • his musicology and other writings
  • his work as a performer: conductor of the Dublin Orchestral Players for over twenty years, founder and director of the Dowland Consort, singer, oboist, and occasional conductor of the Radio Éireann/RTÉ Symphony Orchestra
  • his teaching, professorship at TCD, public lectures, adjudicating at music festivals and numerous radio and television broadcasts
  • as agitator for music, through the Music Association of Ireland, the Arts Council, Forás Éireann and other bodies to which he contributed
  • his place within the wider context of Irish artistic and cultural life in the 20th century

Brian Boydell’s papers, including his original scores, musical notebooks, radio broadcast scripts, and his extensive correspondence with musicians, musical and cultural bodies, and others covering many decades in Irish musical life, are held in the library of Trinity College Dublin and remain a largely untapped resource. The Contemporary Music Centre also holds copies of his scores. His work as an artist in the early 1940s before he devoted himself fully to music were highlighted in the recent exhibition ‘The Language of Dreams’ at the Crawford Art Gallery, Cork. See also Gareth Cox, Axel Klein and Michael Taylor (eds.) The life and music of Brian Boydell (2004), and the Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland (EMIR).

Conference committee:

Prof. Barra Boydell, Dr Barbara Jillian Dignam (Chair, Maynooth University), Dr Kerry Houston (DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama), Roy Stanley (Trinity College Dublin), Marie Moran (Royal Irish Academy of Music), Dr Gareth Cox (Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick)

For further information on the conference, submission process or any other queries, please contact the conference committee chair, Dr Barbara Jillian Dignam, at boydell100@gmail.com

Also follow our conference posts on Twitter https://twitter.com/Boydell100 and Facebook https://www.facebook.com/boydell100/

György Ligeti Symposium Helsinki 2017

György Ligeti Symposium Helsinki 2017

February 10–11th, 2017

Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland

INVITATION

The DocMus Doctoral School at the Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki, invites performers, composers, researchers and students to take part in the conference György Ligeti Symposium Helsinki 2017, organized in collaboration with the contemporary music festival Musica nova Helsinki 2017.

Themes and topics

The symposium concentrates on the following themes, but proposals on other aspects of Ligeti´s music are also welcome. Alongside scholarly presentations, the organizing committee encourages performers to submit proposals on lecture recitals.

• Issues of performance

• Music-analytical and stylistic approaches

• Ligeti´s influence on music of our time

In addition to scholarly presentations and lecture recitals, the symposium will also feature concerts as part of its varied program , including performances of Ligeti´s Piano Etudes and music influenced by Ligeti.

Invited keynote speakers include:

Prof. Jonathan W. Bernard
Composer Lukas Ligeti
Prof. Fredrik Ullén

The proposals

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion), lecture recitals (max. 40 minutes), posters and panels (60 minutes) should be sent as abstracts (max 500 words) to ligeti2017@uniarts.fi with full contact information for each author. Along with scholarly proposals, abstracts representing practice-based research (‘artistic research’) are welcome.
The DL for proposals is September 15th 2016. The accepted proposals will be announced on October 1st 2016.

The conference language, as well as the language for the abstracts, is English. The deadline for submitting abstracts is September 30th 2016. Authors will be contacted by November 30th 2016 with the acceptance decisions.
Conference abstracts for Ligeti Symposium Helsinki 2017 will be published in advance on the conference website and in print. This will serve as a symposium programme, while also providing background information about the participants and their research topics. The applicants are therefore encouraged to include written comments discussing how their artistic and other research work support each other and towards which common goal they are directed.
The proposal must be accompanied by
– Cover sheet listing the name, affiliation, area of specialty, and email for each proposer, along with the proposal title and format.
– Abstract of max.500 words describing the content of the paper, lecture recital, poster, workshop, panel or other sessions of unusual format.
– Detailed program of the lecture recital: composers, work titles, composition years, opus numbers)
– Recording of the proposer’s performance of at least one work to be presented as part of a lecture recital
– Curriculum vitae and contact information
– Equipment needed for performances and presentations (all instruments, data projectors, etc.)
Symposium fee: 80 euros
Organizing Committee:

Professor Lauri Suurpää (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)
Professor Veli-Matti Puumala (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)
University lecturer, DMus Annikka Konttori-Gustafsson
Adjunct professor Alfonso Padilla (Helsinki University)
Coordinator of Doctoral Studies, DMus Markus Kuikka, (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)
Elisa Järvi, DMus (Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki)
Mikko Missi M.A., producer

Contact:

DMus Markus Kuikka
markus.kuikka@uniarts.fi
Ligeti2017@uniarts.fi
http://www.uniarts.fi/ligeti2017

Musica artificiosa: Music as an Art and Profession

51st International Musicological Colloquium, Brno, 10-12/10/2016

Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

 

The importance and the international reputation of the Brno colloquia, founded in 1966, was due not only to their varied themes (each year a separate musicological or interdisciplinary topic has been addressed), but also to the fact that these events provided an annual platform for musicological meetings between East and West during the Cold War. More or less regularly, Brno hosted leading representatives of the field (Kurt von Fischer, Zofia Lissa, Carl Dahlhaus, Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht, John Tyrrell, Michael Beckerman and many others), and it still welcomes their pupils as established representatives of foreign musicology. Today, more than ever, this event looks into the future, hoping to introduce lively new ideas, and to establish new professional contacts and collaboration.

 


Theme: Musica artificiosa: Music as an Art and Profession


The Latin noun “artificium”, in its numerous meanings, refers to art, craft, skill, talent and technology. Its derived adjective, “artificiosus”, accordingly bears a variety of meanings, ranging from skill, which is a condition of each craft, to the artificiality and unnaturalness inherent in rational compositional systems or technologies. This term is thus paradoxically capable of encompassing almost opposing significations in relation to music. With this in mind further possible topics suggest themselves for discussion at the colloquium:

 

  • music as a craft, music as a vocation, music as art;

  • aesthetic issues of “high” versus “low” music;

  • questions of rationality and irrationality in musical structure;

  • the relationship between music and technology;

  • music in the age of machines and information technology / post-technological music;

  • technologically generated / supported / mediated music;

  • virtuosity as a product of industrial society / virtuosity versus sport, etc.

The International Musicological Colloquium will be held 10-12/10/2016 in the building “N”, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, Janáčkovo náměstí 2a, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic.

 

Organizing Committee of the Colloquium:

doc. PhDr. Mikuláš Bek, Ph.D.,

prof. PhDr. Lubomír Spurný, Ph.D.,

PhDr. Petr Macek, Ph.D.,

doc. Mgr. Jana Horáková, Ph.D.,

doc. PhDr. Jiří Zahrádka, Ph.D.,

PhDr. Martin Flašar, Ph.D. 

 

Proposal Submissions:

20-minute papers are welcome, with further time for questions (max. 10 mins.)

Proposals in English, containing the title and abstract of the paper (maximum length 900 characters) should be submitted by email, together with a CV of the proposer (max. 900 characters), to: colloq.brno@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions: 30. 4. 2016.

Proposers will be informed of the committee’s decision after 31. 5. 2016.

Conference fee:

CZK 1000 (active participation) / 500 CZK (active student participation).

The fee is intended to cover the publication of the conference proceedings, refreshments during the event, an evening party and further overheads.

Deadline for payment: 30. 9. 2016 via bank transfer (an account number will be specified later) or payment in cash at the conference venue.

Further questions will be answered by the executive organizer of the colloquium:

PhDr. Martin Flašar, Ph.D.

Department of Musicology MU

Arna Nováka 1

602 00 Brno, CZ

E-mail: flasar@phil.muni.cz

Tel .: (+420) 549 493 790

 

 

Composition Schools in the 20th Century: the Institution and the Context

45th Baltic musicological conference dedicated to the centennial anniversary of Julius Juzeliūnas

19–22 October 2016

Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, Vilnius

Keynote speakers are dr. Algirdas Ambrazas (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre), dr. Gražina Daunoravičienė (Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre), dr. Marina Frolova-Walker (University of Cambridge), and dr. Melita Milin (Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts).

Secondary themes:
The idea of a composition school and the guidelines for its theoretical conceptualisation
The core of composition schools: traditions, programs, and pedagogical directions
Composition schools vs. individual tutors: differentiation and value criteria
Teachers of composition: pedagogic innovations and ties with traditions
Pedagogy of composition and the idea of writing national music: paths and crossroads
Active pedagogy in composition: ideas and realisation
Teaching the art of sounds in the 21st century
The phenomenon of Julius Juzeliūnas as teacher of composition
Exploring Julius Juzeliūnas’ personality and works
Traditions, directions and identity dimensions of the composition schools in the Baltic States
Ties between national schools of composition and traditions within the world’s largest centres of composition training
The micro-stories from different composition schools that capture imagination

There is no conference fee.

English and German are the two working languages of the conference. Participants who wish to speak during the conference or want to offer topics for round-table discussions and study group sessions should submit their proposals by 18 April 2016 to Zita Abramavičiūtė, coordinator of the conference (mokslas@lmta.lt). Individual speakers are expected to provide an abstract of up to 300 words for a 20-minute report and a CV of up to 150 words. Those intended to speak during round table discussions and study group sessions should send a general summary of their topic. The information about the selected themes is to be announced by the end of April 2016. More details regarding the programme and accommodation are due in May 2016 online. Please check the websites of the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre (www.lmta.lt) and the Lithuanian Composers’ Union (www.lks.lt).

The idea of national schools of composition which emerged in the leading European centres of culture in the 19th century was later gradually adopted by smaller nations seeking statehood and cultural identity. The three Baltic States and the neighbouring countries with similar cultural traditions saw the idea of national music coming into fruition in the early 20th century, the development that prompted their national composition schools to begin taking shape between the two world wars. The latter is an undeniable sign of maturity of a national musical culture. Evidently enough, scientific papers dedicated to the development of professional music often overlook the phenomenon of national composition schools the concept of which usually exists as a non-binding general category although no one has ever tried to play down its importance. Whenever we are trying to describe a national school of composition which, according to Algirdas Ambrazas, is “the commonness of self-awareness of a national culture, aspirations, and artistic images inspired by ethnic consciousness“, the term refers to the equivalent of a national culture of music.

The formation and development of pedagogic schools of composition plays a particularly important role within the structure of the phenomenon of a composition school. They bring together teachers, students, programs, classes, and creative efforts of both students and their tutors. Pedagogic schools of composition offer knowledge and expertise, orientation and technological principles vital in the process of developing skills the craft requires and, quite often, help to define one’s creative stance. As far as their concept is concerned, pedagogic schools of composition are based on several commonly accepted components, such as programme, teachers, students, and particular location, time and tradition. This level of the phenomenon reveals the ways alongside which a teacher’s oeuvre together with his or her stylistic and technological mindset, ideals and pedagogic traits inspire their students and, through their artistic endeavours, eventually influence the advance of a particular musical culture.

Artur Kapp, Heino Eller, Jāzeps Vītols and Juozas Gruodis – the four composers behind the emergence of national pedagogic schools of composition in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania – have set the first milestones for the development of professional music in their native countries. Spanning over more than one hundred years, its history provides a wealth of material for anyone eager to learn more about its birth and evolution. This conference aims first and foremost at exploring the concept of national schools of composition in small nations and at examining their role in the processes of musical culture of the 20th century and early 21st century.

The conference offers a ground for discussions on a number of provoking subjects: What is the role of a traditional institution, a school for composers, within the contemporary culture given the ever increasing volume of exchanges in musical information? What is key in making a centre for composition studies attractive and productive? What are the priorities and methodical tools in developing a composer’s creativity and skill of his craft? Should the contemporary knowledge about making music be limited by a national tradition? Is teaching composition the exclusive privilege of the most famous composers? What are the ways of transforming experience and creativity in teaching composition? What famous schools of composition have emerged in the 20th century outside the world’s leading centres of musical education?

These are just a few intriguing questions that have inspired the organisers of the Conference dedicated to the centennial anniversary of Julius Juzeliūnas (1916–2001), one of the outstanding representatives of the Lithuanian school of composition. In Lithuania, Stasys Šimkus was the first to offer a course in composition in 1923 while working as a teacher for Klaipėda Music School, or Memeler Konservatorium der Musik as its was officially known at the time. It took another several years for a more systemic approach to develop after Juozas Gruodis began tutoring composition at Kaunas Music School which eventually grew into a conservatory. As one of the most famous and influential teachers of composition, Julius Juzeliūnas has ensured the continuity of the national tradition in professional music as well as its rejuvenation in the second half of the 20th century.

Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice

Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice

A two-day symposium at the University of York, UK. 28-29 June 2016

Please note: call for papers extended to Monday 4th April with notification of acceptance by Friday 29th April.

Submissions are invited for this event hosted by Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice, a research network of practitioners and practitioner-researchers funded by the AHRC.

Contemporary practices in music appear to be increasingly foregrounding interdisciplinary approaches either from individual artists or collaborators. Compositional activity in all its guises – sonic art, notation-based instrumental music, the myriad forms of electronic music, music in the theatre, music for dance, film and so on – may be conceived as a nexus where the practices of different disciplines can connect in various ways, overlapping, bridging, or integrating. The above research network has been established to investigate this area of practice: what kinds of interdisciplinarity are in evidence here, how are these practices organised/facilitated/led, how is such work created and what might this knowledge add to understandings of artistic creativity?

With these questions in mind the organisers are seeking to gather a broad range of perspectives on interdisciplinary practices involving composition including, but not limited to, historical, interpretative, analytical, philosophical and practice-based viewpoints. We welcome proposals that critique notions of interdisciplinarity and that originate from any disciplinary background (for example artists working compositionally for whom music may not be their ‘home’ discipline).

There are three presentation formats available:

Paper (20 minutes)

Lecture-performance (30 minutes)

Workshop (30 minutes)

Proposals should include the following details:

presenter(s) name(s)

institutional affiliation(s) where appropriate

title of paper/lecture-performance/workshop

300-word abstract

for lecture/performances and workshops please include a full list of technical requirements and please describe the format of the workshop

Please send your proposals to Tom Armstrong: t.armstrong@surrey.ac.uk by Monday 21st March 2016. You will be notified of the outcome by 18th April.

What does democracy sound like? Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

International Conference, 5th-7th November 2015, Philharmonie de Paris

Partners:
L’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris (Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage & Centre Georg Simmel); Centre Marc Bloch Berlin; Palazzetto Bru Zane Venice; Center for Worldmusic Hildesheim; Philharmonie de Paris

With the question ‘What does democracy sound like?’, this jointly organised German-French conference intends to open up a space for discussing conceptions and potential functions of music within democratic societies. In research, relations between music and politics were especially closely intertwined thought in official representations of feudal societies and in the context of the ideological instrumentalization of music in totalitarian regimes. Considering this, it appears that the relationship between music and politics can carry dangerous, or at least problematic implications. This relationship seems to be also difficult with regard to the (unquestioned) necessity of autonomy and the principle of artistic freedom. In contrast to this stands the positive power of music, as represented by its potential for use in resistance, protest and liberation movements and its mobilization within processes of community and identity building. Instead of viewing these differing perspectives as contradictory, this conference aims to consider them as an expression of the complexity of the relationships between musical practices and diverse conceptions of collective action and social groupings.

In both historical and anthropological approaches, various forms of musical practices, discourses and social groupings (state, regional and local communities, clubs and interest groups etc.) within democratic societies come into consideration here:

How can it, for example, be explained that music often acts as a means of representing a society as being free and equal, i.e. as a medium for the shaping of society? What prerequisites and intentions underlie the understanding of music as social ‘common property’? In how far are different actors/experts (researchers, members of various interest groups or also militant associations) involved in the process of legitimating state intervention in various musical spheres (artistic production, mediation, education, construction of musical spaces)? Also to be discussed are terms such as ‘culture’, ‘music’, ‘society’, ‘the people’ etc., which struggle for definitionwithin the continualinterplay of societal legitimation and contradiction. Musical practice, when viewed in relation to the term ‘democracy’–which shouldalso be problematized with regardtoits social and political processes of mediation – demands an openness of approach. Indeed, the term ‘democracy’ is instinctively connected to unifying societal ideals and political norms, yet the practical implementation of this concept clearly varies according to time and place.

In order to bring this variation to attention, the conference will take on a longue duréeperspective and trace ideas of democratic thinking in music – with its continuities and gaps – from its first appearance (late 18th/early 19th century) up to the present day. The examples of France and Germany can be taken as a starting point but the focus should by no means be restricted to them. Rather, points of reference between different countries and cultural contexts should be drawn upon and produced.

On the basis of these initial questions, contributions to one or more of the following key areas are welcome:

Music and State: music-related cultural and educational policies; debates on societal representation and participation; institutionalization processes; etc.

History of Ideas: historical milestones in the development of concepts of ‘music and democracy’; processes of mobilization and stabilization as well as controversies surrounding related concepts (musical autonomy, representation, cultural diversity, etc.); the construction of musical hierarchies and genres; etc.

Creativity and Politics: debates on the definition and diversity of the terms ‘culture’ and ‘music’ from the viewpoint of artists (social culture, culture for everyone, etc.); conceptions of society and politics that underlie musical practices; politically motivated music; etc.

Space and Reception: construction of musical spaces and events in democratic societies (concert halls, festivals, conservatoires, radio, etc.); social and symbolic dimensions of architectonic conceptions and localizations in space; debates on social responsibility and the financing of musical spaces and events; etc.

Musical Publics: practices and contexts of listening and reception; concepts of ‘the public’ (elite, mainstream, masses, listeners, audiences, fans, etc.); means of constructing and representing the public (statistics, expert studies, market analysis, self-organization, medialization); etc.

By inviting contributions that concern themselves with various historical and geographic situations and that are orientated around different points of access to the topic (different actors, institutions, practices, discourses), the conference intends to open a forum in which the variety of perspectives on this theme can be taken into account. The aim is to consider the relationship between music and politics in all its complexities and different manifestations in democratic societies.

Contributions from a broad range of humanities and social science disciplines are welcome (History, Anthropology, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Political Sciences, Sociology, DevelopmentalStudies/Pedagogy, Theatre Studies, etc.).
The conference languages are French, German and English.

Proposals (abstract max. 2000 characters, CV max. 500 characters) should be sent by 15th May 2015 at the latest to the following address: musikdemokratie@gmail.com.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30th June 2015 and the conference programme published online at http://www.musikdemokratie.wordpress.com.
We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Members of the scientific committee:

Philip Bohlman, Esteban Buch, Annegret Fauser, Wolfgang Fuhrmann, Antoine Hennion, Denis Laborde, Karine Le Bail, Julio Mendívil, Olivier Roueff, Patrice Veit, Raimund Vogels, Sarah Zalfen, Hansjakob Ziemer

Organizers:

Talia Bachir-Loopuyt (Université Jean-Monnet), Etienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru-Zane), Christina Kaps (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Elsa Rieu (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris), Lena van der Hoven (Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung)

15th International conference “Principles of Music Composing: Phenomenon of Melody”

This is the15th International Conference “Principles of Music Composing”which will take place in Vilnius, Lithuania during 14-16 October 2015.

This year we are focusing on the phenomenon of melody, as the conference is dedicated to the 140th anniversary of birth of M.K. Čiurlionis, who is renowned for his melodic talent.

Suggested sub-themes:

1. Theoretical conception of the phenomenon of melody:

 a) Differentiation of concepts related to the melody: monody, voice, themes, cantilena, line, horizontal, etc.

b) definition of permanent constants in melody: archetype, structures, functions, communication, etc.

c) analysis of relation between melody and composing principle (compositional entirety), typological schemes

2. Melody in context of European polyphony

3. Differences in paradigms between melody and Eastern monody.

4. Melody in modern compositional practice:

a) new melodic interval relations

b) linearism and verticality

c) melodic rhythm (activation of rhythm)

d) sonorisation of melodic process

5. Melody in the works of contemporary Lithuanian and other Western composers

6. Ethnic melodic features in the works of M.K. Čiurlionis

 

Paper proposals (abstract and short biography) should be submitted to Mr. Andrius Maslekovas via email a.maslekovas@yahoo.com . The abstract must not exceed 500 words. Duration of The presentation will be limited to 20-25 minutes.

The deadline for proposal submission is 16 August 2015 . The proposals will be reviewed by the scientific committee and all applicants will be notified about the outcome by the end of July 2015.

The main languageof the conference is English.

The material of conference will be published.

For more information please contact the coordinator of the conference Mr.Andrius Maslekovas a.maslekovas@yahoo.com  

http://pmc.lmta.lt/EN