Principles of Music Composing: ratio versus intuitio

17th International Music Theory Conference

November 8th – 10th 2017

Vilnius, Lithuania

The aim of the annual conference ‘Principles of Music Composing’ is to foster theoretical thought that is essential for compositional practice and education of composers. Sixteen conferences of this series have already been held in Vilnius. The 17th conference draws attention to the phenomena of rationality and intuition, which are considered to be contrasting yet complementary poles in the compositional process. Intuition often alters the realization of rational scheme, model or archetype chosen by the composer. Meanwhile rational revision may improve intuitive improvisation, sonorous vision, or the artistic idea.

The topic of the conference could be divided into suggested subtopics:

  1. Rational processes of composition and aural intuition (theoretical insights, definition, conceptions, typology)
  2. Musical work as the result of rational and intuitive creative activity (theoretical, historical and aesthetical aspects)
  3. Adaptation of interdisciplinary ideas in the compositional practice based on rational and intuitive origin
  4. Rational and intuitive qualities in new musical resources and techniques (sonorism, microchromatics, extended techniques, aleatory, electronics, etc.)
  5. ‘Rational’ and ‘Intuitive’ composers: features of their works and the creative process
  6. Phenomena of rationality and intuition in the contemporary compositional practice
  7. Lithuanian composers: between rationality and intuition

Paper proposals (abstract and a short biography) should be sent by email pmc@lmta.lt . The abstract must not exceed 500 words. The duration of full presentation is limited to 20–25 minutes.

 The main language of the conference is English.

The deadline for proposal submissions is August 20th 2017. Proposals will be reviewed by the members of the scholarly committee and all applicants will be notified of the outcome in the beginning of September 2017.

The participation fee is 20 Euros.

Selected papers of the conference will be published in the annual peer reviewed scientific journal ‘Principles of Music Composing’.

pmc.lmta.lt 

Creating music across cultures in the 21st century

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Creating music across cultures in the 21st century

Istanbul Technical University, 25-27 May 2017

In the context of one of the world’s most organic melting pots, Istanbul, The Centre for Advanced Studies in Music, Istanbul Technical University, will host an international conference, in partnership with the European Research Council funded project “Beyond East and West,” May 25-27, 2017.

No music is an island.  Since time immemorial, cultures have traded and mixed musics across their domains, yet only in the 21st century have people around the world gained instant and virtually free access to musics beyond those of their neighbors.  The history of these mixings has been marked by a plethora of descriptors, some benign and others acerbic.  Depending on one’s perspective, the “other” musics span the gamut of primitive (“first”), Oriental, classical, art, learned, popular, etc.  Their mixtures have been termed synthetic, syncretic, trans-traditional, trans-cultural, intercultural, cross-cultural, borrowed, or globalized.  The oral and the literate have been contrasted, while the exotic has been vilified.  Quests for musical beauty and knowledge have been shaped by political, economic and social, hegemonic forces.  We are now at a point where, for the first time in history, the playing field has reached a new level of equity, with widespread access to a majority of the world’s traditions, on a scale radically different from a mere generation ago.

We invite proposals for papers (20-minute presentation plus 10-minute discussion) on any topic related to the mixing of musics from different musical traditions.  In addition to mixtures of maqam, raga, and other art traditions, we encourage proposals concerning the incorporation of “folk,” “traditional,” and “low-technology” musics in our 21st-century milieu. Our conference will be Interdisciplinary, and we welcome proposals from composers, performers, improvisers, musicologists, critical theorists, music philosophers, ethnomusicologists, and—especially—etcetera.  While springing from a notated art music tradition, we welcome other perspectives, oral traditions, and boundary stretchers.

Deadline: Please send a 250-word abstract to Robert Reigle, rreigle@gmail.com, with subject heading “Creating Music across Cultures-Abstract,” by 6 March 2017.  We will announce acceptances by 20 March.

Keynote speaker: Dr. Münir Nurettin Beken, Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of California, Los Angeles.

Programme committee: Prof. Amanda Bayley, Prof. Şehvar Beşiroğlu, Prof. Sandeep Bhagwati, Dr. Michael Ellison, Dr. E. Şirin Özgün, Dr. Robert F. Reigle.

Website: http://www.miam.itu.edu.tr/cmac2017/index.html

Conference Fee: Full conference, 3 days: €60 / 200-Turkish Lira; 2 days: €40 / 140-TL; 1 day: €20 / 70-TL.

(€ international/TL local rates).  Free for students, both international and local.

We gratefully acknowledge funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant no. 648810), and MIAM Centre for Advanced Studies in Music.

Musica artificiosa: Music as an Art and Profession

51st International Musicological Colloquium, Brno, 10-12/10/2016

Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

 

The importance and the international reputation of the Brno colloquia, founded in 1966, was due not only to their varied themes (each year a separate musicological or interdisciplinary topic has been addressed), but also to the fact that these events provided an annual platform for musicological meetings between East and West during the Cold War. More or less regularly, Brno hosted leading representatives of the field (Kurt von Fischer, Zofia Lissa, Carl Dahlhaus, Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht, John Tyrrell, Michael Beckerman and many others), and it still welcomes their pupils as established representatives of foreign musicology. Today, more than ever, this event looks into the future, hoping to introduce lively new ideas, and to establish new professional contacts and collaboration.

 


Theme: Musica artificiosa: Music as an Art and Profession


The Latin noun “artificium”, in its numerous meanings, refers to art, craft, skill, talent and technology. Its derived adjective, “artificiosus”, accordingly bears a variety of meanings, ranging from skill, which is a condition of each craft, to the artificiality and unnaturalness inherent in rational compositional systems or technologies. This term is thus paradoxically capable of encompassing almost opposing significations in relation to music. With this in mind further possible topics suggest themselves for discussion at the colloquium:

 

  • music as a craft, music as a vocation, music as art;

  • aesthetic issues of “high” versus “low” music;

  • questions of rationality and irrationality in musical structure;

  • the relationship between music and technology;

  • music in the age of machines and information technology / post-technological music;

  • technologically generated / supported / mediated music;

  • virtuosity as a product of industrial society / virtuosity versus sport, etc.

The International Musicological Colloquium will be held 10-12/10/2016 in the building “N”, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, Janáčkovo náměstí 2a, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic.

 

Organizing Committee of the Colloquium:

doc. PhDr. Mikuláš Bek, Ph.D.,

prof. PhDr. Lubomír Spurný, Ph.D.,

PhDr. Petr Macek, Ph.D.,

doc. Mgr. Jana Horáková, Ph.D.,

doc. PhDr. Jiří Zahrádka, Ph.D.,

PhDr. Martin Flašar, Ph.D. 

 

Proposal Submissions:

20-minute papers are welcome, with further time for questions (max. 10 mins.)

Proposals in English, containing the title and abstract of the paper (maximum length 900 characters) should be submitted by email, together with a CV of the proposer (max. 900 characters), to: colloq.brno@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions: 30. 4. 2016.

Proposers will be informed of the committee’s decision after 31. 5. 2016.

Conference fee:

CZK 1000 (active participation) / 500 CZK (active student participation).

The fee is intended to cover the publication of the conference proceedings, refreshments during the event, an evening party and further overheads.

Deadline for payment: 30. 9. 2016 via bank transfer (an account number will be specified later) or payment in cash at the conference venue.

Further questions will be answered by the executive organizer of the colloquium:

PhDr. Martin Flašar, Ph.D.

Department of Musicology MU

Arna Nováka 1

602 00 Brno, CZ

E-mail: flasar@phil.muni.cz

Tel .: (+420) 549 493 790

 

 

Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice

Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice

A two-day symposium at the University of York, UK. 28-29 June 2016

Please note: call for papers extended to Monday 4th April with notification of acceptance by Friday 29th April.

Submissions are invited for this event hosted by Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice, a research network of practitioners and practitioner-researchers funded by the AHRC.

Contemporary practices in music appear to be increasingly foregrounding interdisciplinary approaches either from individual artists or collaborators. Compositional activity in all its guises – sonic art, notation-based instrumental music, the myriad forms of electronic music, music in the theatre, music for dance, film and so on – may be conceived as a nexus where the practices of different disciplines can connect in various ways, overlapping, bridging, or integrating. The above research network has been established to investigate this area of practice: what kinds of interdisciplinarity are in evidence here, how are these practices organised/facilitated/led, how is such work created and what might this knowledge add to understandings of artistic creativity?

With these questions in mind the organisers are seeking to gather a broad range of perspectives on interdisciplinary practices involving composition including, but not limited to, historical, interpretative, analytical, philosophical and practice-based viewpoints. We welcome proposals that critique notions of interdisciplinarity and that originate from any disciplinary background (for example artists working compositionally for whom music may not be their ‘home’ discipline).

There are three presentation formats available:

Paper (20 minutes)

Lecture-performance (30 minutes)

Workshop (30 minutes)

Proposals should include the following details:

presenter(s) name(s)

institutional affiliation(s) where appropriate

title of paper/lecture-performance/workshop

300-word abstract

for lecture/performances and workshops please include a full list of technical requirements and please describe the format of the workshop

Please send your proposals to Tom Armstrong: t.armstrong@surrey.ac.uk by Monday 21st March 2016. You will be notified of the outcome by 18th April.

Music, Composition, Interdisciplinarity: states of play

Oxford Brookes University, UK. Thursday 28th January 2016

We invite delegates to a one-day seminar at Oxford Brookes University hosted by Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice, a recently established research network of practitioners and academics funded by the AHRC.

Contemporary practices in music appear to be increasingly foregrounding interdisciplinary approaches either from individual artists or collaborators. Compositional activity in all its guises – sonic art, notation-based instrumental music, the myriad forms of electronic music, music in the theatre, dance, film and so on – presents a field of practice where disciplines can connect in various ways, sometimes overlapping, sometimes bridging divides, sometimes integrating. Work of this type interests established and emerging artists alike, from Michael Gordon’s recent City Symphonies to projects by collectives such as squib-box and London Topophobia. Such work gives rise to a number of questions: how are the composer and the act of composing redefined in this context; can interdisciplinary work be facilitated/led and, if so, how; what is the role of technology; is the notion of interdisciplinarity one that concerns artists who work outside the academy; what kinds of new interdisciplines are emerging?

The seminar will address these questions from different perspectives and through different activities: we will hear from leaders of arts organisations and academic units, artists and artist-researchers; activities will include panel discussions, a workshop and a keynote address. A plenary session will draw out emerging themes from the day but we are keen to involve delegates throughout in order to increase our awareness of the state of play amongst artists/musicians working between disciplines. Delegates will play a vital role in extending the size of the network and the breadth of practice and theory it is able to encompass.

Participants include composers Helen Chadwick and Eduardo Miranda, sound artists Cathy Lane and Paul Whitty, Susanna Eastburn (Chief Executive, Sound and Music), Vanessa Read (Executive Director, PRS for Music Foundation) and Rebecca Hoyle (Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Southampton and former director of the interdisciplinary MILES programme at the University of Surrey). Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice is a collaboration between Surrey, York and Oxford Brookes universities and is run jointly by Tom Armstrong and Ambrose Field.

We invite practitioners (both freelance and working from universities), academics, arts administrators (particularly with small and medium sized organisations), promoters, curators, arts funders and educators. As the first event in the network’s schedule of activities the seminar can help shape its direction and generate exciting possibilities for future work.

Timetable

09.30 registration

10.00 welcome by Tom Armstrong

10.15 panel session: leading/facilitating interdisciplinarity

11.45 workshop: vocal theatre techniques

13.15 lunch

14.15 panel session: interdisciplinary practices – states of play

15.00 keynote: Professor Cathy Lane (University of the Arts London, Director of CRISAP)

16.15 plenary session

There is no registration fee, lunch and refreshments will be provided. If you would like to attend please email Tom Armstrong (the principal investigator) at t.armstrong@surrey.ac.uk by Thursday 14th January together with your full name, area of activity/interest, institutional affiliation (if relevant) and any special dietary requirements.

(Per)Forming Art: Performance as Research in Contemporary Artworks

20 Sep 15

University of Leeds

The acts of composing and performing are central processes to the formation of a musical work. Performance is a medium through which music is formed. It is a significant part of a work’s compositional process and, as such, forms a symbiotic relationship with the act of composing. An iterative cycle between performance and composition comes about when the composer performs their own work and/or composes through performance. Performance in this manner can be seen as a form of practice-based research that can guide the compositional process.

This RMA conference focuses on performance as a type of compositional technique and as a mode of practice-based research for the act of composing a work. Primarily engaging with music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, ‘(Per)Forming Art’ invites proposals for a series of lecture-recitals by composers to demonstrate their research through performance. Such disciplines include, but are not limited to, acoustic composition, electronic composition, composing with improvisation, live coding. Presenters and delegates will have the opportunity to meet other researchers, performers, and composers as well as learn about a variety of approaches, techniques, and processes relevant to the formation of an artwork.

Proposals are invited for forty-minute lecture-recital slots (thirty minutes for presenting and performing followed by ten minutes for questions and answers). Composers may perform their own works or invite performers to accompany them (performers will not be provided by the conference).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Performance as practice-based research of compositional techniques in general
  • Performance as an actual technique for composing music
  • How performing other works can inform the compositional process of one’s own work and/or how one engages with performance as a compositional technique
  • How engaging with other performers performing other works can inform the compositional process of one’s own artwork.
  • Live coding and its influence on compositional practice
  • Improvisation and its influence on compositional practice
  • Performance as a unifying medium between separate artistic disciplines within interdisciplinary artworks
  • Performance as a technique for composing a work vs performing a ‘finished’ composed work

Presenters will also be asked to perform in the conference concert on the evening of the conference. The artwork(s) they perform should be related to (if not the same as) their lecture-recital topic. Proposed lecture-recitals should be emailed as abstracts (of up to 500 words, and with titles) to the (Per)Forming Art Symposium (performingartsymposium@gmail.com) no later than Monday 6th July, 2015.

Lecture-recital proposals should include the following details: name, institutional affiliation (if any), email address, any special requests such as AV requirements.

Further information can be found here.

What does democracy sound like? Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

International Conference, 5th-7th November 2015, Philharmonie de Paris

Partners:
L’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris (Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage & Centre Georg Simmel); Centre Marc Bloch Berlin; Palazzetto Bru Zane Venice; Center for Worldmusic Hildesheim; Philharmonie de Paris

With the question ‘What does democracy sound like?’, this jointly organised German-French conference intends to open up a space for discussing conceptions and potential functions of music within democratic societies. In research, relations between music and politics were especially closely intertwined thought in official representations of feudal societies and in the context of the ideological instrumentalization of music in totalitarian regimes. Considering this, it appears that the relationship between music and politics can carry dangerous, or at least problematic implications. This relationship seems to be also difficult with regard to the (unquestioned) necessity of autonomy and the principle of artistic freedom. In contrast to this stands the positive power of music, as represented by its potential for use in resistance, protest and liberation movements and its mobilization within processes of community and identity building. Instead of viewing these differing perspectives as contradictory, this conference aims to consider them as an expression of the complexity of the relationships between musical practices and diverse conceptions of collective action and social groupings.

In both historical and anthropological approaches, various forms of musical practices, discourses and social groupings (state, regional and local communities, clubs and interest groups etc.) within democratic societies come into consideration here:

How can it, for example, be explained that music often acts as a means of representing a society as being free and equal, i.e. as a medium for the shaping of society? What prerequisites and intentions underlie the understanding of music as social ‘common property’? In how far are different actors/experts (researchers, members of various interest groups or also militant associations) involved in the process of legitimating state intervention in various musical spheres (artistic production, mediation, education, construction of musical spaces)? Also to be discussed are terms such as ‘culture’, ‘music’, ‘society’, ‘the people’ etc., which struggle for definitionwithin the continualinterplay of societal legitimation and contradiction. Musical practice, when viewed in relation to the term ‘democracy’–which shouldalso be problematized with regardtoits social and political processes of mediation – demands an openness of approach. Indeed, the term ‘democracy’ is instinctively connected to unifying societal ideals and political norms, yet the practical implementation of this concept clearly varies according to time and place.

In order to bring this variation to attention, the conference will take on a longue duréeperspective and trace ideas of democratic thinking in music – with its continuities and gaps – from its first appearance (late 18th/early 19th century) up to the present day. The examples of France and Germany can be taken as a starting point but the focus should by no means be restricted to them. Rather, points of reference between different countries and cultural contexts should be drawn upon and produced.

On the basis of these initial questions, contributions to one or more of the following key areas are welcome:

Music and State: music-related cultural and educational policies; debates on societal representation and participation; institutionalization processes; etc.

History of Ideas: historical milestones in the development of concepts of ‘music and democracy’; processes of mobilization and stabilization as well as controversies surrounding related concepts (musical autonomy, representation, cultural diversity, etc.); the construction of musical hierarchies and genres; etc.

Creativity and Politics: debates on the definition and diversity of the terms ‘culture’ and ‘music’ from the viewpoint of artists (social culture, culture for everyone, etc.); conceptions of society and politics that underlie musical practices; politically motivated music; etc.

Space and Reception: construction of musical spaces and events in democratic societies (concert halls, festivals, conservatoires, radio, etc.); social and symbolic dimensions of architectonic conceptions and localizations in space; debates on social responsibility and the financing of musical spaces and events; etc.

Musical Publics: practices and contexts of listening and reception; concepts of ‘the public’ (elite, mainstream, masses, listeners, audiences, fans, etc.); means of constructing and representing the public (statistics, expert studies, market analysis, self-organization, medialization); etc.

By inviting contributions that concern themselves with various historical and geographic situations and that are orientated around different points of access to the topic (different actors, institutions, practices, discourses), the conference intends to open a forum in which the variety of perspectives on this theme can be taken into account. The aim is to consider the relationship between music and politics in all its complexities and different manifestations in democratic societies.

Contributions from a broad range of humanities and social science disciplines are welcome (History, Anthropology, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Political Sciences, Sociology, DevelopmentalStudies/Pedagogy, Theatre Studies, etc.).
The conference languages are French, German and English.

Proposals (abstract max. 2000 characters, CV max. 500 characters) should be sent by 15th May 2015 at the latest to the following address: musikdemokratie@gmail.com.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30th June 2015 and the conference programme published online at http://www.musikdemokratie.wordpress.com.
We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Members of the scientific committee:

Philip Bohlman, Esteban Buch, Annegret Fauser, Wolfgang Fuhrmann, Antoine Hennion, Denis Laborde, Karine Le Bail, Julio Mendívil, Olivier Roueff, Patrice Veit, Raimund Vogels, Sarah Zalfen, Hansjakob Ziemer

Organizers:

Talia Bachir-Loopuyt (Université Jean-Monnet), Etienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru-Zane), Christina Kaps (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Elsa Rieu (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris), Lena van der Hoven (Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung)

15th International conference “Principles of Music Composing: Phenomenon of Melody”

This is the15th International Conference “Principles of Music Composing”which will take place in Vilnius, Lithuania during 14-16 October 2015.

This year we are focusing on the phenomenon of melody, as the conference is dedicated to the 140th anniversary of birth of M.K. Čiurlionis, who is renowned for his melodic talent.

Suggested sub-themes:

1. Theoretical conception of the phenomenon of melody:

 a) Differentiation of concepts related to the melody: monody, voice, themes, cantilena, line, horizontal, etc.

b) definition of permanent constants in melody: archetype, structures, functions, communication, etc.

c) analysis of relation between melody and composing principle (compositional entirety), typological schemes

2. Melody in context of European polyphony

3. Differences in paradigms between melody and Eastern monody.

4. Melody in modern compositional practice:

a) new melodic interval relations

b) linearism and verticality

c) melodic rhythm (activation of rhythm)

d) sonorisation of melodic process

5. Melody in the works of contemporary Lithuanian and other Western composers

6. Ethnic melodic features in the works of M.K. Čiurlionis

 

Paper proposals (abstract and short biography) should be submitted to Mr. Andrius Maslekovas via email a.maslekovas@yahoo.com . The abstract must not exceed 500 words. Duration of The presentation will be limited to 20-25 minutes.

The deadline for proposal submission is 16 August 2015 . The proposals will be reviewed by the scientific committee and all applicants will be notified about the outcome by the end of July 2015.

The main languageof the conference is English.

The material of conference will be published.

For more information please contact the coordinator of the conference Mr.Andrius Maslekovas a.maslekovas@yahoo.com  

http://pmc.lmta.lt/EN

Forte / Piano: A Festival Celebrating Pianos in History

How have the practices of composition, performance, improvisation, and listening been informed by the piano in its long history? How have the concepts, designs, materials, and sonorous resources of pianos been entwined with musical thought and affect across time and space? Specifically, how might we resituate eighteenth-century pianos in relation to harpsichords and clavichords, account for the rapid evolution of nineteenth-century pianism, and explain (or challenge) Steinway’s perceived hegemony in the twentieth century?

The Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies invites proposals for recitals, talks and innovative presentations from performers, scholars, organologists, builders, and technicians for an international festival to be held at Cornell University on August 5–9, 2015. We particularly encourage individual and collaborative proposals that combine insights drawn from scholarship, performance, and organology and examine the ways in which pianos have generated, reflected, and modulated musical thought and behavior.

Proposals may focus on composers, performance traditions, improvisatory methods, and geographical centers of influence. Potential topics include Haydn’s keyboard music; Brahms’s piano music; the piano in early twentieth-century Paris; the piano in late eighteenth-century London; the improvisation of cadenzas, fantasias, and preludes; the standardization of piano manufacture in the context of industrialization; pedagogical institutions; the piano, bodily techniques, and the performance of gender.

The festival will feature a number of leading performers, including Tom Beghin, Kris Bezuidenhout, Malcolm Bilson, David Breitman, Penelope Crawford, Alexei Lubimov, and Andrew Willis among many others. The festival will focus on an array of historical instruments and replicas built by prominent builders. We encourage proposals that will take advantage of the opportunities these instruments afford, and will provide more specific information on request. Potential presentation formats include (but are not limited to) traditional conference papers, lecture-recitals, lecture-demonstrations, and discussion panels.

Proposals should include a 250-word description and a CV, and for performers, a sound or video recording of at least 30 minutes. The submission deadline is September 15, 2014. Proposals may be submitted online at www.westfield.org/festival

British Contemporary Classical Music since 2000s

Venue:
 Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House, University of London

Convener: Osvaldo Glieca

Date:
 Tuesday, 21 May 2013

Time:
 2.00pm to 8.30pm

Keynote Speakers: TBA

 Call for Papers:

The organisers are looking for a number of presentations, which explore and relate to current theoretical and philosophical positions on British contemporary classical music of the last decade. Critiques based on aesthetic principles, compositional techniques, and new sound-timbre are welcome, especially on the younger generation of British composers born around the 1970s.

Interests are also directed – and not restricted – to the way of promoting British living composers within the art-business, music publishing and recording industry, particularly in the recent times where the media industries are becoming very influential, taking over more control from the traditional record companies.

Audio and/or video, and power point presentations are welcome.

This seminar will be in conjunction with the Simon Holt music conference.

Lectures will be 20 minutes in duration.

Please submit proposals of no more than 300 words plus a short biography to:

Mr. Osvaldo Glieca:  osvaldoglieca@gmail.com

Deadline: 26 April 2013

Please note that all costs for attendance at the conference will need to be covered by the participants.

Full delegate fee: £25

Student delegate fee: £15