“Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture” Conference 2020

Call for Papers!

We warmly welcome you all to a new LAHP student-led activities conference: Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture. We are excited to bring you two days of thought-provoking discussions designed to showcase new and emerging approaches to the study of gender construction and identity in American culture, addressing how femininities and masculinities are explored through the modes of music, literature, art, and wider media and cultural apparatus. The aim of this conference is to bring together PhD students and early career academics within the field of American Studies across departmental boundaries, enabling them to share their research and engage in collaborative debates surrounding the role of gender in a culturally and socio-politically tumultuous period of American culture; the twentieth century.

The conference will be held on Wednesday 10th June and Thursday 11th June 2020 in the historical and cultural epicenter of London, at King’s College London’s Strand Campus.

We specifically aim to pose the question: how can examinations of creative practices and cultural products enable a deeper understanding of regionally determined expressions of gendered identity? Whether participants challenge current discourse surrounding gender and American Studies, or discuss the ways in which we as academics shape and pursue the intersection of such disciplines, we intend to create a space wherein interdisciplinary research is produced, debated, and assessed; our call for papers encourages exchange between diverse fields of interest.

Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Articulations of gender and race, class, age, ability, sexuality, etc. in American culture, i.e. literature, music, film, audience engagement, reception, and participation
  • Exclusion and gender inequalities in American culture 
  • Collaborative practices and the creation of community
  • Cultural and social histories

How to Participate:

We are looking for 15 to 20 minute presentations, which may include formats such as films, digital artworks, lecture performances, etc.

Please submit an abstract (up to 250 words) outlining the paper’s main arguments, format, and relevance to the conference theme. Submissions should also include your institutional affiliation, paper title, 3-4 keywords, a short biography (up to 100 words), and your contact details.

Email both the proposal and biography to genderinamericaconference@kcl.ac.uk by 23.59 GMT on Wednesday, 15th April 2020.

More information is available at kclgenderinamericaconference.wordpress.com, including registration details.

Costs: Participation in and attendance to the conference is free*.
*Please note that while there are potential bursaries for travel expenses, all participants are responsible for covering the majority of costs including possible visa expenses and accommodation.

Keynote Speakers:

We are thrilled to announce our two Keynote Speakers: Dr. Rona Cran, Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre, and Assistant Professor Dr. Martin Lüthe, Assistant Professor of Culture.

Dr. Rona Cran
Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature
Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre
University of Birmingham, UK

Rona Cran is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature at the University of Birmingham, where she is also Director of the Centre for American and Canadian Studies. She is the author of Collage in Twentieth-Century American Art, Literature, and Culture (Ashgate/Routledge, 2014). Her current book project is entitled Multiple Voices: New York City Poetry, 1950-1995; she is also compiling a new anthology of New York City poetry, City of the World: Poems of New York (Fordham University Press, 2021). She has written or is writing articles on New York poetry, American women poet-editors and the mimeograph revolution, Joe Brainard and John Ashbery, Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg and collage, place, space and identity in Richard Yates, William Burroughs and eating, and William Burroughs and art.

Dr. Martin Lüthe
Assistant Professor
Department of Culture
Freie Universität Berlin (The Free University of Berlin), Germany

Martin Lüthe received his doctorate from the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture in Gießen. He is currently Einstein Junior fellow and assistant professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. Lüthe published the monographs “We Missed a Lot of Church, So the Music Is Our Confessional”: Rap and Religion (Lit Verlag, 2008) and Color-Line and Crossing-Over: Motown and Performances of Blackness in 1960s American Culture (WVT, 2011) and is working on a manuscript for Wire Writings: Media Change in the Culture of the Progressive Era.

Conference Organisers:

Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura is currently a PhD candidate in the Music Department at King’s College London supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership to pursue a thesis in Opera Studies. Previously, she completed her LLB and MSc in Political Science and Sociology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. She holds a Classical Vocal Studies Diploma from the Musical Horizons Conservatory in Athens and now performs as a Soprano. Her major academic interests are centered on gender studies, specialising in operatic femininities.

Robyn Shooter
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Robyn Shooter is a current PhD student enrolled in the Music department at King’s College London (KCL), undertaking a thesis examining constructions of identity and authenticity in alternative country music. She has previously completed an MMus in Musicology and Ethnomusicology (KCL), an MA in Cultural and Creative Industries (KCL), and holds a BA (Hons) in Comparative Literature (Queen Mary University of London). Robyn’s research is informed by her interdisciplinary background, with interests including popular culture in the United States, countercultural movements in twentieth-century America and Europe, regional identity and the American South, and nostalgic readings of Americana cultural heritage.

Music & Material Culture. From Medieval Times to the Present

MUSIC AND MATERIAL CULTURE. FROM MEDIEVAL TIMES TO THE PRESENT

One-Day Workshop
University of Cambridge, 7 December 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS

     During the last decade, many disciplines have been increasingly oriented towards the study of material culture, exploring the relations between objects and people. From different perspectives within the humanities and social sciences, this 'material turn' has emphasized both the materiality of objects, and their social life as bearers of cultural meaning.
     Music and sound studies have also seen a growing interest in objects and materiality, with approaches ranging from the relations of music and space, the technologies of sound production and consumption, and the materiality of musical notation, to the raise of 'materialism' as opposed to the 'idealism' that governed traditional musicology. However, these developments have taken place in a generally uncoordinated manner, and the purpose of this conference is to bring them together in such a way as to deepen knowledge and promote discussion of objects and materiality in music and sound studies.
     This workshop proposes to create a bridge between material culture studies and musical studies, exploring the wide range of objects that interact with musical practice and consumption, sound production, and the sense of hearing. The workshop has a wide regional and historical scope, ranging from Medieval times to the present.

Some of the topics that will be addressed in the workshop are:

–The theoretical and methodological challenges of materialism in musicology

–The social life of musical instruments: a new organology

–Scientific knowledge and ideas of the material in music and sound

–The body and the senses

–Mobility and cultural exchange

–Sonic materiality and immateriality of music

Abstracts of no more than 350 words should be sent both to af504@cam.ac.uk and vw261@cam.ac.uk by August 22, 2016. Please include title, name, institutional affiliation, email address, and a short biography (150 words). The Committee will notify applicants of the outcome by September 5, 2016. We welcome submissions for twenty minutes papers in English and in French. Due to time constraints, only a limited amount of papers will be selected. If you have any further queries, please contact the organising committee by emailing af504@cam.ac.uk or vw261@cam.ac.uk.

Organising Committee:

Amparo Fontaine (University of Cambridge)
Vera Wolkowicz (University of Cambridge)
Violeta Nigro Giunta (CRAL/EHESS)
Nicolò Palazzetti (CRAL/EHESS)

What does democracy sound like? Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

International Conference, 5th-7th November 2015, Philharmonie de Paris

Partners:
L’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris (Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage & Centre Georg Simmel); Centre Marc Bloch Berlin; Palazzetto Bru Zane Venice; Center for Worldmusic Hildesheim; Philharmonie de Paris

With the question ‘What does democracy sound like?’, this jointly organised German-French conference intends to open up a space for discussing conceptions and potential functions of music within democratic societies. In research, relations between music and politics were especially closely intertwined thought in official representations of feudal societies and in the context of the ideological instrumentalization of music in totalitarian regimes. Considering this, it appears that the relationship between music and politics can carry dangerous, or at least problematic implications. This relationship seems to be also difficult with regard to the (unquestioned) necessity of autonomy and the principle of artistic freedom. In contrast to this stands the positive power of music, as represented by its potential for use in resistance, protest and liberation movements and its mobilization within processes of community and identity building. Instead of viewing these differing perspectives as contradictory, this conference aims to consider them as an expression of the complexity of the relationships between musical practices and diverse conceptions of collective action and social groupings.

In both historical and anthropological approaches, various forms of musical practices, discourses and social groupings (state, regional and local communities, clubs and interest groups etc.) within democratic societies come into consideration here:

How can it, for example, be explained that music often acts as a means of representing a society as being free and equal, i.e. as a medium for the shaping of society? What prerequisites and intentions underlie the understanding of music as social ‘common property’? In how far are different actors/experts (researchers, members of various interest groups or also militant associations) involved in the process of legitimating state intervention in various musical spheres (artistic production, mediation, education, construction of musical spaces)? Also to be discussed are terms such as ‘culture’, ‘music’, ‘society’, ‘the people’ etc., which struggle for definitionwithin the continualinterplay of societal legitimation and contradiction. Musical practice, when viewed in relation to the term ‘democracy’–which shouldalso be problematized with regardtoits social and political processes of mediation – demands an openness of approach. Indeed, the term ‘democracy’ is instinctively connected to unifying societal ideals and political norms, yet the practical implementation of this concept clearly varies according to time and place.

In order to bring this variation to attention, the conference will take on a longue duréeperspective and trace ideas of democratic thinking in music – with its continuities and gaps – from its first appearance (late 18th/early 19th century) up to the present day. The examples of France and Germany can be taken as a starting point but the focus should by no means be restricted to them. Rather, points of reference between different countries and cultural contexts should be drawn upon and produced.

On the basis of these initial questions, contributions to one or more of the following key areas are welcome:

Music and State: music-related cultural and educational policies; debates on societal representation and participation; institutionalization processes; etc.

History of Ideas: historical milestones in the development of concepts of ‘music and democracy’; processes of mobilization and stabilization as well as controversies surrounding related concepts (musical autonomy, representation, cultural diversity, etc.); the construction of musical hierarchies and genres; etc.

Creativity and Politics: debates on the definition and diversity of the terms ‘culture’ and ‘music’ from the viewpoint of artists (social culture, culture for everyone, etc.); conceptions of society and politics that underlie musical practices; politically motivated music; etc.

Space and Reception: construction of musical spaces and events in democratic societies (concert halls, festivals, conservatoires, radio, etc.); social and symbolic dimensions of architectonic conceptions and localizations in space; debates on social responsibility and the financing of musical spaces and events; etc.

Musical Publics: practices and contexts of listening and reception; concepts of ‘the public’ (elite, mainstream, masses, listeners, audiences, fans, etc.); means of constructing and representing the public (statistics, expert studies, market analysis, self-organization, medialization); etc.

By inviting contributions that concern themselves with various historical and geographic situations and that are orientated around different points of access to the topic (different actors, institutions, practices, discourses), the conference intends to open a forum in which the variety of perspectives on this theme can be taken into account. The aim is to consider the relationship between music and politics in all its complexities and different manifestations in democratic societies.

Contributions from a broad range of humanities and social science disciplines are welcome (History, Anthropology, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Political Sciences, Sociology, DevelopmentalStudies/Pedagogy, Theatre Studies, etc.).
The conference languages are French, German and English.

Proposals (abstract max. 2000 characters, CV max. 500 characters) should be sent by 15th May 2015 at the latest to the following address: musikdemokratie@gmail.com.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30th June 2015 and the conference programme published online at http://www.musikdemokratie.wordpress.com.
We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Members of the scientific committee:

Philip Bohlman, Esteban Buch, Annegret Fauser, Wolfgang Fuhrmann, Antoine Hennion, Denis Laborde, Karine Le Bail, Julio Mendívil, Olivier Roueff, Patrice Veit, Raimund Vogels, Sarah Zalfen, Hansjakob Ziemer

Organizers:

Talia Bachir-Loopuyt (Université Jean-Monnet), Etienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru-Zane), Christina Kaps (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Elsa Rieu (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris), Lena van der Hoven (Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung)