Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology. EAA 2020.

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

Rupert Till (and Raquel Jiménez and Margarita Díaz-Andreu)

Prof. Rupert Till PhD FHEA CMgr MCMI
Professor of Music
Associate Dean for International
School of Music, Humanities and Media
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield | Queensgate | Huddersfield | HD1 3DH
http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=smusrt
http://rupertchill.wordpress.com

Media of Hate: Representations of Religious Persecution and Repression in Early Modern Europe

3-4 October 2019

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN THE ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES (CRASSH), UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Further details available from http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/28573

The religious turmoil of the early modern period saw widespread repression of minority religious groups across Europe, involving degrees of violence that prompted large-scale migration across national borders. Those suffering persecution at home often sought refuge in likeminded nations, yet in striking parallel to the refugee crises of today, migrant groups often faced considerable prejudice within their host nations (if not outright violence). Evidence for such religious prejudice can be found across the continent in a variety of media.

Media of Hate brings together scholars from the fields of early modern literature, religious studies, history, musicology, and art history in order to explore the various media used to communicate and represent discrimination and distrust towards religious minorities across early modern European contexts, from Dutch Protestant and French Huguenot refugees, to Jewish communities, and Catholic recusants. What distinctions, if any, emerge between singing discrimination, painting it, or writing a poem about it? On what were people’s fears fundamentally based (nationality, cultural habits, language)? Is it possible to discern similarities and differences in xenophobic material from country to country? What effect did hate speech have on policy-making and public opinion? Through this conference, we hope to delineate trajectories regarding hate in the early modern public sphere, arguing for the power that media could wield in shaping historical events and policies, as well as the considerable role that popular concerns about foreigners and belonging played in shaping the literature, art, and music of the period.

Eighth Annual Meeting | Il Gusto Italiano: Italian Style and Transalpine Exchanges in Early Keyboard Music

May 13–15, 2019
Sam Houston State University School of Music, Huntsville, Texas, U.S.A.

Call for Proposals

Admired, imitated, and heatedly debated, the concept of Italian style and taste plays an essential role in the history of keyboard music. The Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) dedicates its eighth annual meeting to all aspects of Italian style and its international reception throughout the centuries, including—but not limited to—composition and improvisation, music theory and basso continuo, instrument making, pedagogy, and temperaments. Hosted by the Center for Early Music Research and Performance (CEMRAP) at the Sam Houston State University School of Music (Huntsville, Texas), three days of events (Monday through Wednesday, May 13– 15, 2019) will include paper presentations, lecture-recitals, and mini-recitals, evening concerts, and an exhibition of publications, recordings, and instrument makers’ work. A limited number of presentations and sessions on historical keyboard topics that are not directly related to the theme of the conference, will be considered. Please submit all proposals through the following electronic submission forms:

Paper Presentation: https://goo.gl/forms/iD9QXXJ3L47e3P9W2
Lecture Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/Fr4Dn5ZUnkit4L9j1
Mini Recital: https://goo.gl/forms/ApvdZBseV8OplEEg2
Themed Session: https://goo.gl/forms/D0s7bErhvM26zp8V2

The submission deadline is EXTENDED TO NOVEMBER 5, 2018. Presentations of all formats are limited to 25 minutes. Paper and lecture-recital proposals require an abstract of no more than 2,500 characters. For mini-recitals, submit complete program information and provide links to up to two representative recordings pertaining to the proposal. Performers not intending to bring their own instruments or to make arrangements to use exhibitors’ instruments may perform on the instruments listed below. All proposals must include a short biographical statement (no more than 1,500 characters) for all presenters.

Notification of accepted proposals will be made by November 15, 2018. Presenters must be members of HKSNA and must register for the conference. Presenters must also cover their own travel and other expenses. Further information, as it becomes available, will be posted on the society’s website http://www.historicalkeyboardsociety.org.

HKSNA 2019 also welcomes exhibitors to showcase their instruments, products, and services in the conference. Furthermore, instrument makers are invited to submit proposals for maintenance workshops, etc. Please direct inquiries and proposals to hksna2019@gmail.com.

Available Instruments
Harpsichords
Flemish Single by Gerald Self, GGAA to d3, 8’8’, lute stop, 415/440 Hz, delrin plectra.
Flemish Double after Couchet by Joel Katzman, GGAA to e3, 8’8’4’, 415/440 Hz, quill plectra.
Italian Single after Celestini by Joel Katzman, GGBB to d3, 8’8’, 392/415/440 Hz, strung in brass, quill plectra.

Fortepiano
Paul McNulty after Walter & Son c. 1804, FF to c4, 430 Hz, knee levers for moderator (left) and dampers (right).

Organ
Italian “organo di legno” (all pipes cypress wood), Giovanni Pradella after 17th-century models, C–d3 chromatic, 440 Hz, 1/4 comma meantone. Disposition: Principale 8’, Ottava 4’, Decimaquinta 2’, Flauto stoppo 8’, Flauto in ottava 4’, Fiffaro (voce umana) 8’ (treble).

Program Committee
Mario Aschauer, chair, Sam Houston State University
David Kelzenberg, HKSNA president
Carol lei Breckenridge, HKSNA vice-president
Sonia Lee, HKSNA immediate past president
Maria Luisa Baldassari, Conservatorio Rossini Pesaro
Massimiliano Guido, Università degli studi di Pavia

Musical Instruments Resource Network (MIRN) conference ‘The Life Cycle of Musical Instruments’

Musical Instruments Resource Network (MIRN) Conference

Theme: The Life Cycle of Musical Instruments and MIRN’s first Q&A surgery

Date: Thursday, 12th October, 2017

Venue: Horniman Museum and Gardens, London, SE23 3PQ

Further information and updates: https://mirn.org.uk/events/

Musical instruments can have curious and complex biographies! They often accumulate layers of wear, accretion, repair and modification, presenting challenges to all who come into contact with them.

This conference will explore the myriad ways that musical instruments have been adapted to extend their working lives, and the rationale behind such adaptations. What are the outcomes when new and old materials and past and present working practices meet? What values are relevant when we repair or change musical instruments, and how do we formulate an approach to accretions and interventions?

MIRN invites contributions from musicians, dealers, instrument makers/restorers, conservators, researchers and curators who have played on or worked with instruments that have undergone change, or who have themselves been agents in that change. Contributions may address general issues, relay a specific case history, or be a combination of both. Presentations may take the form of 5 minute (plus 5 minutes questions), 10 minute (plus five minutes questions) or 20 minute (plus 10 minutes questions) talks or talk/demonstrations. Panel discussions of 60 or 90 minutes, examining one issue or instrument from a variety of perspectives would also be welcome.

Following the presentations, MIRN will hold its first musical instrument Q&A surgery where members of the audience, who may bring (small) instruments or photographs with them, will be invited to pose questions to a panel of specialists. NB It will not be possible to accommodate questions regarding the valuation of individual instruments.

The conference day will be brought to a close with MIRN’s AGM to which all members are invited, followed by a social hour at a nearby pub.

Submit proposals by 5pm BST 10th June 2017 to enquiries@mirn.org.uk with the subject line: CONF2017.

Proposal submission guidelines:

  • For 5 minute presentations: not to exceed 250 words
  • For 10 minute presentations: not to exceed 300 words
  • For 20 minute presentations: not to exceed 400 words
  • For panel discussions of 60 minutes: 3-4 speakers, submit one proposal not exceeding 450 words.
  • For panel discussions of 90 minutes: 4-6 speakers, submit one proposal not exceeding 500 words.

All proposals must include the proposer’s name, address, email address and institutional affiliation (if any). Each must state clearly the type of presentation for which application is being made. All prospective panel members must be listed and their individual details included as above. All proposals must be submitted electronically as Microsoft or Microsoft-compatible WORD documents attached to an email. Acceptances will be notified by 1st July.

The conference registration fee will be £25 (MIRN members), £20 (MIRN members who are retired, students or unwaged) or £30 (non-members), to include all presentations, lunch, coffee, tea and a tour of the Horniman Music Gallery. Registration will open in July.

Updates and further information at https://mirn.org.uk/events/

Listening to Early Modern Catholicism. New Perspectives from Musicology

When: July 14-16, 2014
Where: Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA
Organizing Committee: T. Frank Kennedy, S.J.; Michael Noone; Daniele V. Filippi
Sponsored by The Jesuit Institute and The Music Department of Boston College

An international group of musicologists will convene at Boston College to discuss the sonic cultures of Early Modern Catholicism (c.1500–1750).
Scholars from nine different countries will demonstrate the unique insights that can be gained about Early Modern Catholicism from the study of music and sound.
Keynote addresses will be offered by John O’Malley, S.J. (Georgetown University), and Robert L. Kendrick (The University of Chicago).
The conference will also feature a round table (chaired by T. Frank Kennedy, S.J.) concerning the role of the Jesuits and their networks in the creation of Catholic soundscapes.

For further information, including the list of participants, the program, and the abstracts, please see http://www.listening2014.com/
Contact: daniele.filippi@bc.edu