Music in the Ibero-Afro-American Universe: Interdisciplinary Challenges

 

7th UFRJ INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MUSICOLOGY

& II MEETING OF THE BRAZILIAN ASSOCIATION FOR MUSIC THEORY AND ANALYSIS

“Music in the Ibero-Afro-American Universe: Interdisciplinary Challenges”

 

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Rio de Janeiro, October 24–27, 2016

 

The VII SIM_UFRJ “Music in the Ibero-Afro-American Universe” proposes to approach this theme in broad scope of diverse cultural traditions, contexts and historical times, and of special interest to the II TeMA_Meeting is to promote de debate on the “Interdisciplinary challenges between Musicologies and Analytical Theories: Dialogues, Frontiers, and Intersections.” Discussion issues: issues and trends in the Ibero-Afro-American musicologies; musicologies and analytical theories: dialogues, frontiers, and intersections; critical and analytical theories and methods in the disciplinary knowledge; the field of music and the challenges of intra-, inter-, multi-, and trans-disciplinarity; analytical theories and interculturalities; identity and otherness, representation and cultural translation; interdisciplinary studies: music, film, visual arts, theatre, literature, philosophy, history, sociology, and cultural anthropology, cultural dialogues, circulation, transfer, reception, and appropriation of ideas, repertories, aesthetics, styles, techniques, musical practices and ideologies; heritage and collections; musics of written, oral, performing traditions; culture, society and politics; institutional, scientific, artistic, and cultural policies.

 

IMPORTANT DATES

Abstract submission deadline: September 5, 2016

Notification to successful applicants: September 20, 2016

Submission of the full version of the paper for publication in the Proceedings: November 30, 2016

 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Proposals (abstract 300-500 words, and short bio) may be written in Portuguese, Spanish or English, and submitted as attached file (*.doc or *.rtf), indicating the preferred attendance to each conference: SIM-UFRJ to the e-mail sim@musica.ufrj.br or TeMA_Meeting to the e-mail diretoria@tema.mus.br. In case the proposal fits the full scope of the joint conference, it must be sent simultaneously to both e-mails.

 

Program Committee Chairs

Maria Alice Volpe volpe@musica.ufrj.br

Ilza Nogueira nogueira.ilza@gmail.com

 

More info: http://www.musica.ufrj.br/ and http://tema.mus.br/.

Also https://www.facebook.com/events/675180942635190/

International Conference of Young Musicologists. Young Musicology Today: tendencies, challenges and perspectives

The aim of the conference is to integrate the musicological community through the creation of an international forum for exchanging ideas and research experiences. We encourage young musicologists to present results from ongoing studies and to engage in discussion on the future of musicology, its role and place in the contemporary culture. Currently, musicology, which is not only the study of music, is starting to perform social functions, becoming not only a field of scientific inquiry but one of use to society. During the conference, we would like to consider new avenues of research, new methodologies of musicologists’ work, and the challenges and career prospects faced by musicologists entering the labour market. It will also be an opportunity to consider the subject areas of interest to young musicology.

Subject areas for consideration include

  • New research perspectives in musicology
  • Music versus other arts
  • Music in the public space (sonosphere research)
  • Music in society (music and ideologies)
  • Music and the sacred
  • Music and science (e.g. psychology of music)
  • Challenges of modern ethnomusicology
  • The state and the form of contemporary music criticism
  • Source studies and music editing
  • Music librarianship – issues and challenges
  • Performance practice
  • Theory of music
  • Music and pop culture
  • Opera nowadays

The conference will incorporate both traditional lectures and panel discussions, during which groups of researchers conducting a joint project or studying similar subjects will be able to present the results of their studies or discuss a specific subject. We encourage the participants to organise their own panel sessions during the conference (due to time constraints, we suggest no more than four papers during one session; please indicate the person leading the session during registration).

In addition, the conference programme includes:

  • “A musicologist on the labour market” panel

This will be an opportunity for an in-depth discussion of the current employment situation of musicology graduates in Poland and abroad, and for the presentation of experiences in this area. We encourage participation in this panel session by musicologists – musical life animators, employees of media and cultural and educational associations and institutions etc.

  • Masters’ lectures (plenary speakers)
  • The conference programme includes additional events, such as concerts, sightseeing in Krakow, and exhibitions.

A publication of the collected papers presented at the conference is also planned.

Conference language: English.

Schedule

  • Accepting applications with abstracts – until 31th of May 2016.
  • Information about accepted papers – by 30 June 2016.
  • Conference dates: 7-9 November 2016.

Applications should be made by sending the application form via email to: agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl  and musicologytoday@gmail.com

You can find an application form here.

For any further information please feel free to contact: Agnieszka Lakner; agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl

Conference fee

Conference fee: 200,00 PLN / 50 €

The fee includes:

Admission to the conference, conference program, publication of the paper in the conference proceedings, lunches and coffee breaks during sessions and conference attractions such as sightseeing and concerts. Registration fee does not include accommodation and transportation. If you wish, Organizers will help you to book an accommodation.

Organizer

Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Department of Musicology

Address: Westerplatte Street 10; 31-033 Kraków, Poland

http://www.muzykologia.uj.edu.pl

 

 

XXIII Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society

XXIII ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF ITALIAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY

 

Como, Conservatory of music “Giuseppe Verdi”, 21-23 October 2016

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The twenty-third Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society will be hosted in Como from 21th-23rd October, in collaboration with the Conservatory of music “Giuseppe Verdi”. On October 22nd at 3 p.m. the annual Meeting of all members will take place.

 

The Conference will be divided into free paper sessions.

 

Scholars from all over the world are invited to submit their proposals.

 

In your abstract (which has not to exceed 30 lines in word format) please indicate the title of the proposed paper, the state of the art in your research field, with an outline of the project and the specific contribution to the current knowledge. Only original, unpublished research will be taken into consideration: papers in print will not be accepted.

 

Along with the text please send also a short C/V (max. 15 lines) and indicate the A/V equipment required.

 

The paper shall not exceed 20 minutes in duration (corresponding to an 8-page text containing to a maximum of 16000 characters). Scholars are not allowed to send more than one abstract. The abstracts have to be sent to the e-mail address convegni@sidm.it or – by mail – to the Società Italiana di Musicologia, Casella Postale 318 Ag. Roma Acilia, via Saponara 00125 Rome, Italy (please add on the envelope the indication “XXIII Convegno annuale”) no later than June 15, 2016. Acceptance of papers will be notified by July, 15, 2016.

 

We inform you that one session of the conference will be entitled “From the Belle Epoque to the First World War: in search for a Musical Identity”, and based on the topics exposed in the book “Italia 1911. Musica e società alla fine della Belle Époque” (Milano, Guerini Associati, 2014).

 

Please provide your full name, address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address. For further information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.sidm.it.

Performing Knowledge Conference

25-26 April 2016

Emmanuel College, Cambridge

Call for Papers

Bringing together performing musicians engaging in practice-led research, ethnographers of Western art music, and psychologists specialising in tacit knowledge research, this two-day conference will explore performers’ interpretative processes and their uses of tacit knowledge (also called implicit, procedural, or embodied knowledge) in understanding the explicit knowledge presented in historical documents, analyses, and performance treatises.

Keynote participants include Professor Tom Beghin (fortepianist), Margaret Faultless (violinist), Professor Christopher Page (guitarist), Chris Maene (instrument builder), Professor Tina K. Ramnarine (musician and anthropologist), Dr Satinder Gill (experimental psychologist), and Professor John Rink (Director, Cambridge Centre for Musical Performance Studies).

Belgian-Canadian fortepianist Tom Beghin (Orpheus Institute/McGill University) will perform a keynote recital featuring Beethoven’s last three piano sonatas, to be presented on a replica of Beethoven’s Broadwood piano built by master instrument builder Chris Maene.

Margaret Faultless (Cambridge University/RAM) will present an open rehearsal discussing interpretative decision-making processes within conductor-less orchestras. Her presentation will be followed by a performance with the Cambridge University Collegium Musicum.

Keynote papers will be presented by:

  • Professor Christopher Page: Performance, Imagination and the Early-Romantic Guitar
  • Professor Tina K. Ramnarine: Performance, Storytelling and the Politics of Musical Knowledge
  • Dr Satinder Gill: Knowing-How and Knowing-When: researching performers’ musical timing

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers, 30-minute lecture-recitals (each will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion), and posters. The conference language is English. Presentations that engage critically with theories and methodologies of researching performers’ tacit knowledge, such as the use of ethnographic techniques, practice-led research, or the analysis of recorded audio and audio-visual performance, are especially welcome. Interdisciplinary perspectives are also invited, for example, papers that draw on opera or dance studies, material studies, or cognitive studies in music in discussing the theme of the conference. Topics may include:

  • Performers’ creative engagement with historical documents and objects, extending beyond the conventional remit of historically-informed performance practice studies.
  • The influence of instrument affordances on performers’ interpretative choices.
  • How musicians communicate through gesture and/or vocalisation.
  • The challenges and potentials of self-reflexive research in performance.
  • The influence of tradition on performers’ interpretative ideas.
  • The dynamics of performers’ interpretative decision-making processes in practice, rehearsals, and/or public performance (both solo and in ensemble).

Please submit proposals by Friday, 5 February 2016 including:

  • Name and institutional affiliation (if applicable).
  • Curriculum Vitae and 100-word biography.
  • Title and abstract of presentation, max. 450 words. For lecture-recitals, please include programme details of any repertoire to be performed (details are excluded from the word count).
  • A list of technical requirements (computer projection and a Steinway grand piano will be available).

Proposals will be assessed by the conference committee and applicants will be notified of the outcome by 15 February. The registration fee for delegates (whether presenting or observing) will be £90 (full) and £50 (students). Early-bird registration (by 19 February) and RMA member rates are £80 (full) and £40 (students). Registration fee includes all concerts, meals (excluding breakfast), and refreshments. Additional tickets (if required) for Tom Beghin’s recital may be booked through ADC Ticketing for £25 / £15.

Proposals should be emailed to performingknowledge@emma.cam.ac.uk. Please send any enquires to this address also.

Web Page: https://www.emma.cam.ac.uk/conferences/events/perfknow/

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/647358332072144/

“Indecent Musicology” (NYU)

“Indecent Musicology”

Keynote Speaker: Emily Wilbourne

Saturday, March 26, 2016 [9:30am — 9:00pm]

Silver Center for Arts and Sciences, New York University

VIEW CFP HERE

Call for Papers:

This is a call for the provocative, the experimental, the radical, the “fringe.” Without constantly pushing boundaries, fields are in danger of becoming stale, or worse, regressive. We invite graduate students of all disciplines to submit abstracts that meditate on an indecent musicology. Formal papers are welcome in addition to innovative, interdisciplinary, and unconventional presentations. Papers and presentations will be 20 minutes in length with 10 additional minutes designated for questions; performances and unconventional presentations will be 45 minutes. Composers are responsible for their own musicians and equipment. The following are merely suggestions:

  • “Blasphemology” and manifestations of lewdness
  • Pataphysical and supranatural meditations on music
  • Intersections of indecency, race, law, music, sexuality, sociality, performativity, etc.
  • Constructions of radical obscenity, perversions, and indecency in music
  • Phenomenology of indecent musical exposure

Submission Deadline: Monday, January 25, 2016

Submission Guidelines:

All proposals (paper, performance, composition) must include the following:

  1. An anonymous abstract of no more than 300 words sent as a PDF attachment to indecentmusic2016@gmail.com. Make sure you have omitted any metadata that would identify you (e.g. author’s name, institution, author tags). Footnotes will be included in the word count. Please submit no more than 3 pages of supplementary materials. Please title your attachment: PaperTitle.pdf
  2. A cover letter that includes the title of the presentation, the format of the presentation (e.g. paper, performance, etc.), applicable institutional affiliation, phone number, email address, and AV equipment requests.

Applicants will be notified by email no later than February 8, 2016. Upon acceptance, presenters will be asked to send a final draft of their abstract for publication in the conference program.

For questions, please contact the conference chair, Marcus Ryan Pyle, at mrp448@nyu.edu

Ancient Hellenic & Roman Music Conference 2016

Ancient Hellenic & Roman Music Conference 2016 

Athens, Greece

Monday, 11 to Thursday, 14 July, 2016 

moisa2016-athens.eu

The Department of Music Studies of the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens in association with L’École Française d’Athènes will host the 9th Moisa Conference in Athens, Greece, from Monday, 11 to Thursday, 14 July, 2016.

The conference theme is:

“Music and the animal world in Hellenic and Roman antiquity”.

The keynote speaker will be François-Bernard Mâche, musicologist and composer. There will be paper and poster presentations, a final concert with contemporary music inspired by Antiquity, and an excursion to Delphoi on Friday 15 July, for those who would be willing to stay on after the end of the conference.

———— 

Call for Papers 

We are now soliciting submissions for oral and poster presentations. Speakers are invited from all fields of enquiry – philology, archaeology, musicology, computer science, zoology, musical acoustics, theatrology – to contribute to the theme of the conference. We welcome submissions on the following topics: 

  • Description of animal voices (tonal and rhythmic aspects; audio representation)
  • Classification of animal species by their calls
  • Association of animal sounds with the seasons and agriculture
  • Influence of human music on animals
  • Animal parts in the construction of musical instruments
  • Animals and semi-animals as musicians
  • Animal calls imitated in human music

 Papers should be presented and posters written in English and must not have been previously published. The final decision on the category will be made by the scientific committee.

Paper presentations must not exceed the limit of 20 minutes. A 10 minute discussion will follow each paper.

Full papers will be submitted after the conference by a
date to be specified in due course. A selection of accepted papers will be submitted for publication to the Moisa journal Greek & Roman Musical Studies (http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/greek-and-roman-musical-studies).

————

Important Dates

Title and abstract submissions (deadline): March 15, 2016

Notifications: April 30, 2016

————

General inquiries should be directed to the conference coordinators:

Stelios Psaroudakes: spsaroud@music.uoa.gr

Sylvain Perrot: sylvain.r.perrot@gmail.com

British Forum for Ethnomusicology Annual Conference 2016

British Forum for Ethnomusicology: Annual Conference, University of Kent, UK, 14–17 April 2016

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS EXTENDED TO SUNDAY 15 NOVEMBER!

University of Kent, School of Music and Fine Art, The Historic Dockyard, Chatham, Kent, UK

The BFE invites proposals for its 2016 conference, which will be held at the Historic Dockyard on the banks of the River Medway at Chatham. Proposals on any current research are welcome; papers having a nautical theme would be particularly appropriate, given the surroundings.

Proposals are invited for:

  • Papers (20 minutes with 5–10 minutes for questions)
  • Organised sessions (3 or 4 linked papers around a theme, totalling 1.5 or 2 hours)
  • Round table discussion sessions (3 or 4 shorter presentations, around 15 minutes each, followed by a chaired discussion, totalling 1.5 or 2 hours)
  • Poster or other material for digital display.

Proposals should be submitted in the following formats to enable them to be reviewed anonymously:

Paper proposals: include the name and email address of the proposer, paper title, and abstract (the latter not exceeding 300 words). The name of the proposer should not appear in the abstract.

Organised session proposals: include the names and email addresses of the proposer and the other participants, an overall abstract for the session (not exceeding 300 words), and abstracts for each contributor (no more than 300 words each). Abstracts should not include the names of any of the participants.

Roundtable proposals: include the names and email addresses of the proposer and the other participants (the proposer will be assumed to be the chair unless stated otherwise), an overall abstract for roundtable (not exceeding 300 words), and abstracts for each contributor (no more than 300 words each). Abstracts should not include the names of any of the participants.

Poster/digital display proposals (digital displays will allow research to be shared using electronic posters as well as videos and other media). Include the name and email address of the researcher, a description of the material to be presented (not exceeding 300 words), and a brief description of your technical requirements. The name of the proposer should not appear in the descriptions.

EXTENDED DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: 15 NOVEMBER 2015. Successful applicants will be notified in December.

Please note that all presenters must be members of the BFE at the time of the conference. Proposals should be submitted by email to bfeconference2016@outlook.com

Musical Cartographies

Musical Cartographies: The Harvard Graduate Music Forum Conference, 2016

29-30 January 2016

Harvard University Department of Music
Cambridge, MA

Keynote: Arun Saldanha (University of Minnesota)

Call for Proposals

This interdisciplinary conference investigates the relationship between music and the organization of space. Approaching the topic from the perspectives of both scholarly inquiry and creative practice, we will ask how music has been implicated in mappings of physical and conceptual spaces and how spatial mappings have functioned as ways of thinking about musical sound.

Topics for consideration include but are not limited to:

Geography, power, and identity:

  • How have historically and culturally contingent geographical formations conditioned music’s production, dissemination, and reception?
  • How does music intersect with geographically-mediated categories such as race, nation, and ecology?
  • How do issues of diaspora, migration, and stateless peoples complicate the relationships we draw between music and geography?

Representations of sound, time, and musical form:

  • How have music-theoretical models mapped domains such as pitch, timbre, and gesture?
  • How is map-and path- making implicated in music cognition and the phenomenology of listening, and how might models such as cognitive mapping shed light on these processes?
  • How might we think of musical notation and other visual representations of music as forms of cartography?

Practices and technologies:

  • How do scholars and creative practitioners draw and contest disciplinary, aesthetic and conceptual boundaries—for instance, between academic fields, between art forms, or between the “musical” or “extra-musical”?
  • How do composers, performers, and sound artists creatively organize the physical and conceptual spaces in which they work?
  • How have technologies been implicated in mapping musical spaces, and how have new media technologies altered the shape, nature, and limits of such spaces?

Submissions
We welcome submissions from current graduate students exploring these issues from the perspectives of both research and practice. We seek proposals on all repertoires, musical practices, and historical periods from a broad array of disciplinary and methodological perspectives.

Formats for presentation include:

  • 20-minute papers, audiovisual presentations, or exploratory text works, with 10 minutes for discussion
    Please submit abstracts of a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, up to 4 additional pages for figures. Please add a short statement regarding AV requirements.
  • 30-minute composers’ colloquia, performances, or lecture-recitals, with 15 minutes for discussion
    Please submit details of the work to be presented in a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, links to downloads (via Dropbox, WeTransfer, Google Drive etc.) of relevant sound recordings, scores, and/or supplementary documentation.

In addition to the above questions, composers and performers might consider:

  • What role does space play in your conceptualization of musical form? In your approach to musical performance?
  • What is mapped during composition or performance? This could include time, coincidence, relationships, physical space, and other parameters.
  • How do you relate in your work to geographical categories such as race, nation, and ecology? Likewise, how do you relate to conceptual boundaries such as those between genres, art forms, or historical periods?
  • How do your creative practices challenge existing ways of mapping musical sound?

Deadline for the proposal: 17 November 2015

Please send submissions to: harvardgmf2016@gmail.com

For more information, please visit: http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gmf2016/home

Analysis – Interpretation – Performance

A Contact Zone for the Reconsideration of Musicological Methods

Annual Conference of the Austrian Society for Musicology (ÖGMW) 2015

University of Music and Performing Arts Graz (KUG)
November 18–21, 2015

Programme Committee:
Christian Utz (chair); Klaus Aringer, Christa Brüstle, Federico Celestini, Martin Eybl, Werner Goebl, Gerd Grupe

Call for Papers [download]

Processes of musical performance are increasingly the focus of musicological attention. The discourse on the relevance of an aural interpretation for a contemporary understanding of music from the past was triggered by the trend towards historically-informed performance practice that developed from the 1960s onwards. Further “performative turns” in aesthetics, literature and theatre studies did not, however, bring about major repercussions in musicology until the 1990s. Together with an enhanced interest in the history of reception and performance, these developments finally contributed to an understanding of musical works not solely as objects of contemplation but also as frameworks for a “performance culture”. Parallel developments in technology enabled recordings to be used broadly as fundamental research material, often in performance-oriented corpus studies.

Nevertheless, the question of the position of musical analysis, as a traditional musicological tool, in the face of this methodological integration of performance and sound remains unresolved. Conventional approaches that considered musical analyses to be “guidelines” for performance have been decidedly refuted since the 1990s, culminating in Carolyn Abbate’s categorical separation of “drastic” musical experiences through live performances and “gnostic” interpretations based on established musicology and analysis. Recently, a more differentiated approach to this field of tension has emerged, paradigmatically represented in Nicholas Cook’s extensive concept of “music as performance”. Increasingly, the term “performance” is understood to encompass not only live situations but also various forms of medially-documented performances.

How can intuitive knowledge applied and gained in performances (as documented in “arts-based research”, for instance) and analytically-substantiated musicological insights synergize fruitfully? This question may be approached from diverse research traditions: along with the studies on reception and performance history that have been carried out over the course of several decades, the historical and systematic methods of British Performance Studies (including the research projects CHARM 2004–2009 and CMPCP 2009–2014), empirical research e.g. in Performance Science (international symposia/ISPS since 2007), and performance-oriented analytical methods, the rediscovery of structural analysis in ethnomusicology (in the journal Analytical Approaches to World Music, among others) has also shed new light on the field of performance, which had always been of central importance to that discipline.

Abstracts submitted for the annual conference of the Austrian Society for Musicology 2015 may thus feature any area of musicology and should address current research on the relationship between analysis, interpretation and performance as a challenge for reconsidering musicological methods.

Section 1: The Presence of Historical Sound
Section 2: Listening to the Twentieth Century: Musical Performance in the Era of Analysis
Section 3: Analyzing Interpretations and Interpreting Analyses
Section 4: Performance and Analysis in Non-Western Musical Genres
Section 5: Performance, Analysis and Empirical Research Methods

Keynotes:
Kai Köpp (Bern University of the Arts)
Joshua Rifkin (Boston University)
John Rink (University of Cambridge)
Renee Timmers (University of Sheffield)
Sarah Weiss (Yale University / YaleNUSCollege Singapore)

Abstracts for papers (up to 500 words) and poster presentations (up to 300 words) may be submitted by e-mail to oegmw2015(at)kug.ac.at until May 31, 2015. The abstracts will be reviewed anonymously by a jury. Notification of papers accepted will be made by July 15, 2015.

www.kug.ac.at/performance-analysis

What does democracy sound like? Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

International Conference, 5th-7th November 2015, Philharmonie de Paris

Partners:
L’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris (Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage & Centre Georg Simmel); Centre Marc Bloch Berlin; Palazzetto Bru Zane Venice; Center for Worldmusic Hildesheim; Philharmonie de Paris

With the question ‘What does democracy sound like?’, this jointly organised German-French conference intends to open up a space for discussing conceptions and potential functions of music within democratic societies. In research, relations between music and politics were especially closely intertwined thought in official representations of feudal societies and in the context of the ideological instrumentalization of music in totalitarian regimes. Considering this, it appears that the relationship between music and politics can carry dangerous, or at least problematic implications. This relationship seems to be also difficult with regard to the (unquestioned) necessity of autonomy and the principle of artistic freedom. In contrast to this stands the positive power of music, as represented by its potential for use in resistance, protest and liberation movements and its mobilization within processes of community and identity building. Instead of viewing these differing perspectives as contradictory, this conference aims to consider them as an expression of the complexity of the relationships between musical practices and diverse conceptions of collective action and social groupings.

In both historical and anthropological approaches, various forms of musical practices, discourses and social groupings (state, regional and local communities, clubs and interest groups etc.) within democratic societies come into consideration here:

How can it, for example, be explained that music often acts as a means of representing a society as being free and equal, i.e. as a medium for the shaping of society? What prerequisites and intentions underlie the understanding of music as social ‘common property’? In how far are different actors/experts (researchers, members of various interest groups or also militant associations) involved in the process of legitimating state intervention in various musical spheres (artistic production, mediation, education, construction of musical spaces)? Also to be discussed are terms such as ‘culture’, ‘music’, ‘society’, ‘the people’ etc., which struggle for definitionwithin the continualinterplay of societal legitimation and contradiction. Musical practice, when viewed in relation to the term ‘democracy’–which shouldalso be problematized with regardtoits social and political processes of mediation – demands an openness of approach. Indeed, the term ‘democracy’ is instinctively connected to unifying societal ideals and political norms, yet the practical implementation of this concept clearly varies according to time and place.

In order to bring this variation to attention, the conference will take on a longue duréeperspective and trace ideas of democratic thinking in music – with its continuities and gaps – from its first appearance (late 18th/early 19th century) up to the present day. The examples of France and Germany can be taken as a starting point but the focus should by no means be restricted to them. Rather, points of reference between different countries and cultural contexts should be drawn upon and produced.

On the basis of these initial questions, contributions to one or more of the following key areas are welcome:

Music and State: music-related cultural and educational policies; debates on societal representation and participation; institutionalization processes; etc.

History of Ideas: historical milestones in the development of concepts of ‘music and democracy’; processes of mobilization and stabilization as well as controversies surrounding related concepts (musical autonomy, representation, cultural diversity, etc.); the construction of musical hierarchies and genres; etc.

Creativity and Politics: debates on the definition and diversity of the terms ‘culture’ and ‘music’ from the viewpoint of artists (social culture, culture for everyone, etc.); conceptions of society and politics that underlie musical practices; politically motivated music; etc.

Space and Reception: construction of musical spaces and events in democratic societies (concert halls, festivals, conservatoires, radio, etc.); social and symbolic dimensions of architectonic conceptions and localizations in space; debates on social responsibility and the financing of musical spaces and events; etc.

Musical Publics: practices and contexts of listening and reception; concepts of ‘the public’ (elite, mainstream, masses, listeners, audiences, fans, etc.); means of constructing and representing the public (statistics, expert studies, market analysis, self-organization, medialization); etc.

By inviting contributions that concern themselves with various historical and geographic situations and that are orientated around different points of access to the topic (different actors, institutions, practices, discourses), the conference intends to open a forum in which the variety of perspectives on this theme can be taken into account. The aim is to consider the relationship between music and politics in all its complexities and different manifestations in democratic societies.

Contributions from a broad range of humanities and social science disciplines are welcome (History, Anthropology, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Political Sciences, Sociology, DevelopmentalStudies/Pedagogy, Theatre Studies, etc.).
The conference languages are French, German and English.

Proposals (abstract max. 2000 characters, CV max. 500 characters) should be sent by 15th May 2015 at the latest to the following address: musikdemokratie@gmail.com.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30th June 2015 and the conference programme published online at http://www.musikdemokratie.wordpress.com.
We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Members of the scientific committee:

Philip Bohlman, Esteban Buch, Annegret Fauser, Wolfgang Fuhrmann, Antoine Hennion, Denis Laborde, Karine Le Bail, Julio Mendívil, Olivier Roueff, Patrice Veit, Raimund Vogels, Sarah Zalfen, Hansjakob Ziemer

Organizers:

Talia Bachir-Loopuyt (Université Jean-Monnet), Etienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru-Zane), Christina Kaps (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Elsa Rieu (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris), Lena van der Hoven (Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung)