The Study of Musical Experiences: Perception and Diversity


We are delighted to announce our Autumn Course, which will run from November 28th-December 1st 2017 at the University of Bergen. The event is organized by the Grieg Research School in Interdisciplinary Music Studies (Western Norway).

The theme for this course is “The Study of Musical Experiences: Perception and Diversity”. More info available here. Continue reading “The Study of Musical Experiences: Perception and Diversity”


‘I Am Not There’ International Conference on Bob Dylan

18-19 May 2017

Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, NOVA University of Lisbon.
Organization: CETAPS and CESEM

Call for Papers
(until 26 January 2017)

In 1999, Bob Dylan (b. 1941) was included in the ‘Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century’ as a “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize jury awarded Dylan a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, the artist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. The New York Times (13-10-2016) reported: “Mr. Dylan, 75, is the first musician to win the award, and his selection on Thursday is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901…In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honor, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels”. After the official Nobel announcement, opinions divided the public and critics. CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) and CESEM (Sociology and Musical Aesthetics Research Center), NOVA University of Lisbon, decided to analyze and celebrate the aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural significance of Bob Dylan’s musical, literary and artistic (visual) work, as well as its influence(s).
The initial expression in the conference’s title is the title of the biographical musical drama film I Am Not There (2007, directed by Todd Haynes and co-written with Oren Moverman), which intercuts the storylines of seven different Dylan-inspired characters. According to Haynes, “the minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that’s why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him – things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate” (apud D. Dalton, Who Is the Man?: In Search of the Real Bob Dylan, 2012).

We will privilege comparative and transdisciplinary approaches. Potential contributors are invited to submit a bionote and a 300 word abstract on themes related to any of the following conference tracks:

• Influences in/of Dylan’s music;
• Bob Dylan and awards;
• The ‘power’ of the Nobel prize for literature;
• The alter-egos and personas of Robert Zimmerman/Bob Dylan (Blind boy Grunt, Bob Landy, Tedham Porterhouse, etc.);
• Dylan’s music videos;
• Dylan in/as performance;
• Dylan and religion;
• Art, activism, protest, and social unrest;
• Dylan on stage – presence, performance and liveliness;
• Dylanesque spaces and places;
• Influences in/of Dylan’s visual art;
• Intertextuality in Dylan’s lyrics, music and videos (text-music relationship);
• Intermediality in musical genres and practices;
• Lyrics as/and poetry/literary narratives;
• Dylan depicted (visual biographies, photography, press and record [album] covers, official website);
• Dylan in cyberspace (myspace, facebook, youtube, etc);
• Dylan’s songs;
• Dylan as trend-setter;
• Musical style(s) in Dylan;
• Bob Dylan in the classroom;
• Adaptation of Dylan’s texts as children’s literature;
• Dylan in/and translation;
• Dylan’s fandom;
• Academia and Dylan’s fandom;
• Music as a social and political agent in Dylan’s and other composers’ production;
• Dylan, music and the moving image (cinema, documentary, television, internet);
• The roles and ideologies of musical, literary and artistic criticism: after Dylan;
• Gender and music;
• Listening to Dylan: social behaviors, musical taste, consumption patterns.

Working languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish. No translation will be provided.

Papers and panels on the above themes are invited. However, papers/panels on other subjects related to the above topics will also be considered. Participants will be held to a twenty minute presentation limit. Please submit an abstract and a bio note, by 05 January 2017, to the conference email:

To ensure prompt notification, please include your e-mail address on your submission. If you are interested in chairing a session, please note this at the top of your abstract.
Registration fee: 80 euros. BA and MA students: 30 euros.

Conference website:

Coordination: Rogério Puga (CETAPS) e Paula Gomes Ribeiro (CESEM).

The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice

International Conference
Venice, 25–27 May 2017

Organised by the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice (Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage), in collaboration with the Archivio Storico del Patriarcato di Venezia, the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Spazio Svizzero in Venice

Deadline for proposals: 30 November 2016

On basis of new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology, the conference aims to bring together inter- and multidisciplinary approaches to the significance of “soundscape” in the context of the rich and complex urban system of early modern Venice. As a supreme example of “ceremonial city”, Venice is particularly suitable for investigating how soundscape interacts with urban space in the creation of an elaborate social and cultural identity.

The conference forms part of ‘The Sound of Eternity. A Digital Platform for the Polyphonic Choir-Books of the Ducal Chapel of St Mark’s, Venice’, a research project funded by the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, in continuation of ‘The Sound of Eternity. Investigating the Choir Books of the Ducal Chapel of St Mark’s, Venice’, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

Suggested topics for the conference include:
Soundscape and urban identity
Sound and civic ceremonial
Sound and space in urban life
Sound and the “Myth of Venice”
Tradition and innovation in urban soundscape
Urban sound and cultural patronage
The economics of sound in performance
Methodological perspectives

Selected papers will be published in English in a dedicated, peer-reviewed volume (to be published by Brepols, Turnhout, in the new series Venetian Music Studies).

Please email proposals (250-350 words) for 20-minute papers (with 10 minutes for questions and discussion) as well as a short biography to

Further updates and conference information will be available (from January 2017) on the conference website (which will continue to be updated with details about costs, events and accommodation as the conference draws nearer):

Accepted proposals will be announced before 15 December 2016.

Organising Committee
David Bryant, Augusto Celentano, Luigi Collarile, Renzo Orsini
Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

Please address all queries to:
David Bryant –
Luigi Collarile –

Language, Music, and Computing

Second International Workshop on Language, Music, and Computing

Aims of the workshop: to encourage interdisciplinary communication and collaboration of linguists, musicians and IT-specialists in the sphere of some actual problems, among which are the following:
1. Language and music acquisition; influence of music skills on language acquisition and language processing; influence of linguistic skills on music acquisition; relationship between music and language training.
2. Linguistic and music knowledge, their structure and functioning; explicit and implicit knowledge of music and language; similarities and differences in understanding of music and language.
3. Automatic classification of linguistic and music knowledge; formal models of linguistic and music knowledge; musical information retrieval vs. linguistic information retrieval.

This year special topics of the workshop are:
– Formal representation of language and music: differences and similarities
– Sound corpora in music and linguistics

Keynote speakers:
Sabine Iatridou, USA
Sergi Jordà, Spain
Merryl Goldberg, USA
Elena Riekhakainen, Russia

Languages of the conference:
Russian & English (some sessions will be simultaneously translated)

Submission process:

Abstracts from different fields are warmly invited. Presentations will last 20 minutes, followed by a ten minute discussion. Abstracts should be submitted before November 27, 2016. Notification of acceptance follows on January 20, 2017. Abstracts should be 450-500 words long (without any subheadings) and clearly present a research question/aim, critical review of the literature, methodology, results and conclusions. Abstracts should be submitted as a pdf. If you wish to include any specific symbols (such as phonetic transcription), please submit your paper both in DOC and PDF format. We have the intention to select papers for a peer-reviewed special issue.
Please send each abstract both in anonymized and unanonymized forms (with author(s) and affiliation) to the following address:

Registration fee (includes program, coffee-breaks, post-conference publication, visa support (if needed)):
Early-bird fee (before March 15, 2017) – 2500 rubles, or 45 euros; students – 1000 rubles, or 20 euros;
regular fee (after March 15, 2017) – 3000 rubles, or 55 euros; students – 1500 rubles, or 35 euros.

Important dates:

Submission deadline: November 27, 2016
Notification of acceptance: January 20, 2017
Registration starts: February 1, 2017
Early-bird registration ends: March 15, 2017
Workshop: April 17-19, 2017
Final papers: June 1, 2017
Results of the revision process: July 25, 2017
Publication – Fall 2017

Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century

International Conference.  Corfu, Greece, 17-19 November 2017

2017 marks for opera in Greece four anniversaries: the centenary since the passing of Spiros Samaras (1861-1917), the bicentenary since the birth of two important Greek opera composers, Spiridon Xyndas (1817-1896) and Domenikos Padovas (1817-1892), as well as the 150 years since the premiere of the opera O ypopsifios [The Parliamentary Candidate] (1867, music by Xyndas and libretto by Ioannis Rinopoulos), which was both the first full-scale opera in Greek and the pivotal point for the emergence of opera in Greek language.

The Hellenic Music Research Lab of the Music Department of the Ionian University and Corfu Philharmonic Society on the occasion of the aforementioned anniversaries organize the international conference entitled Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century, which is going to take place in Corfu, Greece, on 17, 18 and 19 November 2017.

Corfu, the seat of the Ionian University, was the birthplace of the three aforementioned composers. The San Giacomo theatre of Corfu, the earliest theatrical stage of the region, hosted opera performances already since 1733, contributing decisively to the dissemination of opera within the Greek world during 19th century. Moreover, Xyndas, Padovas and Samaras presented in the same theatre their operas. Xyndas in 1840 was also one of the initial founders and professors of the Corfu Philharmonic Society and he dedicated to it certain of his operas. Padovas also taught harmony and music theory in the Philharmonic, in 1857 he dedicated to it his opera Dirce and since 1884 he was appointed the Society’s artistic director. Samaras, a student of Xyndas during his early music training, had multiple connections with the Philharmonic Society and had been its honorary artistic director since 1889.

Given the above, the conference will not be confined solely to the lives and the works of the aforementioned composers, but it will focus on matters regarding the place, the reception, the importance and the formative factors of the operatic activity within the Greek world during the “long nineteenth century”. With these in mind, some indicative themes of the conference are proposed to be;

  • Spiros Samaras: life and work
  • Spiridon Xindas: life and work
  • Domenikos Padovas: life and work
  • The activities of the Italian opera troupes in the Greek areas (singers, musicians, impresarios, repertory etc)
  • The activities of the French opera troupes in the Greek areas
  • The activities of the Greek opera troupes
  • Opera in the Greek communities of Diaspora (Trieste, Odessa, Alexandria, Smyrna, Constantinople etc)
  • Opera in the Greek urban centres
  • Institutions of operatic activity
  • The reception of opera in the Greek world
  • Subjects related to Greece in the 19th-century opera

The official languages of the opera are GreekItalian and English.

Scholars and researchers interested to participate in the conference are asked to submit their abstracts (250 words) and short biographical notes (100 words) for papers of no more than 20 minutes. Themed sessions of 60 minutes can also be proposed (Abstract of 450 words and Bios of 100 words).

There are no fees for the participation or the attendance of the conference.

The final date for the proposals’ submission is 31 December 2016.

The abstracts and the biographical notes should be sent until the above date in the following email:
The Official website of the conference is:
The conference’s programme will be finalized by 1 March 2017.

Programme Committee
Prof. Haris Xanthoudakis
Prof. Anastasia Siopsi
A. Prof. Panos Vlagopoulos
A. Professor Avra Xapapadakou

Organizing Committee
Spiridon Padovas
Kostas Kardamis
Kostas Sambanis
Stella Kourbana
Alexandros Charkiolakis
Gerasimos Martinis

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

Gesellschaft für Tanzforschung · GTF Annual Conference 2016 · Call for papers

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

November 18–20, 2016 · Orff-Institute of the University Mozarteum/Salzburg

The term TRACES has been positioned very intentionally between the two central artistic means of expression SOUNDS and MOVES, as interface so to speak, since sounds as well as bodily movements can both be regarded as traces due to their volatility in space and time. They can enter into a dialog with other artistic traces (of movement), such as the grand brushstroke of a painter, the fine drawings of a graphic artist or the light projections of a digital installation, in order to access further dimensions of space and time for the hearing and seeing of movement dynamics. Against this backdrop, an (in the best sense) endlessly creative process gathers momentum, in which audible and/or visible movement traces are permanently recreated, without ever getting clearly defined contours nor even taking a definite shape.

What kinds of artistic options are possible due to such interactions between sound- and movement traces, either in the form of a performance or an event? And what kinds of challenges result from this for the spectators/listeners – particularly if these interactions primarily unfold within the area of the non-verbal, beyond the obvious allocations of meaning or outstanding narrative threads? This conference will discuss perspectives based on (rehearsal) processes and production aesthetics as well as questions relating to the perception of the interplay of analogue/digital, instrumental/ vocal and musical or noise-like sounds with virtual or real body movements in choreographies, improvisations and dance performances: The objective is to ‘trace’ audio-visual movement traces and the resulting network of sensory impressions.

Deadline for proposals for lectures, workshops, poster presentations, lecture demonstrations, performances and labs (please give the preferred format) is May 1.

Please send the respective proposal with a maximum of 250 words and a short biography of 100 words at most to Stephanie Schroedter:

You will be informed about the programme selection by June 1, 2016 at the latest.
For more information look at:

Decoration of Performance Space: Meaning and Ideology

Thirteenth symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Iconography of the Performing Arts,
organized by the Centro studi per la ricerca documentale sul teatro e il melodramma europeo Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Venice

Venice, 17–20 May 2016

Thinking of music performance, we usually consider the action happening on the theater or concert stage, in front of spectators. However, performance space surrounding the spectators, its interior and exterior architectural decoration, as well as fashion of spectators and their habits are also constituent elements of a performance, supplementing the experience of a live event. Decoration elements, such as mythological compositions painted on theater ceilings, state insignia placed above the proscenium, or portraits of distinguished playwrights, composers or performers on theatre facades reflect the attitudes of past times and ideologies of political powers patronizing performances; sculptures accumulated over the time in theaters’ foyers visually represent historical memory of the space becoming (national) shrines to performing arts. Theaters and other performance spaces are architectural artworks, often representing the pinnacle in artistic careers of their architects and interior designers, frequently appropriating the status of urban iconic symbols.

The conference will focus on visual programs and decorations of spaces in which musical performances occur and the self-representation of audiences attending performances. All types of performance venues and performances which include music should be considered, including concerts and music theatre, religious ceremonies, contemporary popular music events, urban spectacles, pageantries and parades. Proposals are invited concerning:

  • Architectural interior and exterior decorations of performance spaces
  • Reflections of political power presented in theatrical performances
  • Ideological context of religious rituals and their spaces
  • Political power demonstrated in public spectacles and parades
  • Theater and concert hall architecture
  • Spectators and audiences (habits, fashion, hair-styling, behavior)
  • Interpretation and issues concerning opera staging and scenography in general

English is preferred language for the conference presentations.
Abstracts of 200–300 words may be submitted before 15 February 2016 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309


Maria Ida Biggi
Centro studi per la ricerca documentale sul teatro e il melodramma europeo
Fondazione Giorgio Cini
Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice

“Indecent Musicology” (NYU)

“Indecent Musicology”

Keynote Speaker: Emily Wilbourne

Saturday, March 26, 2016 [9:30am — 9:00pm]

Silver Center for Arts and Sciences, New York University


Call for Papers:

This is a call for the provocative, the experimental, the radical, the “fringe.” Without constantly pushing boundaries, fields are in danger of becoming stale, or worse, regressive. We invite graduate students of all disciplines to submit abstracts that meditate on an indecent musicology. Formal papers are welcome in addition to innovative, interdisciplinary, and unconventional presentations. Papers and presentations will be 20 minutes in length with 10 additional minutes designated for questions; performances and unconventional presentations will be 45 minutes. Composers are responsible for their own musicians and equipment. The following are merely suggestions:

  • “Blasphemology” and manifestations of lewdness
  • Pataphysical and supranatural meditations on music
  • Intersections of indecency, race, law, music, sexuality, sociality, performativity, etc.
  • Constructions of radical obscenity, perversions, and indecency in music
  • Phenomenology of indecent musical exposure

Submission Deadline: Monday, January 25, 2016

Submission Guidelines:

All proposals (paper, performance, composition) must include the following:

  1. An anonymous abstract of no more than 300 words sent as a PDF attachment to Make sure you have omitted any metadata that would identify you (e.g. author’s name, institution, author tags). Footnotes will be included in the word count. Please submit no more than 3 pages of supplementary materials. Please title your attachment: PaperTitle.pdf
  2. A cover letter that includes the title of the presentation, the format of the presentation (e.g. paper, performance, etc.), applicable institutional affiliation, phone number, email address, and AV equipment requests.

Applicants will be notified by email no later than February 8, 2016. Upon acceptance, presenters will be asked to send a final draft of their abstract for publication in the conference program.

For questions, please contact the conference chair, Marcus Ryan Pyle, at

Music, Composition, Interdisciplinarity: states of play

Oxford Brookes University, UK. Thursday 28th January 2016

We invite delegates to a one-day seminar at Oxford Brookes University hosted by Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice, a recently established research network of practitioners and academics funded by the AHRC.

Contemporary practices in music appear to be increasingly foregrounding interdisciplinary approaches either from individual artists or collaborators. Compositional activity in all its guises – sonic art, notation-based instrumental music, the myriad forms of electronic music, music in the theatre, dance, film and so on – presents a field of practice where disciplines can connect in various ways, sometimes overlapping, sometimes bridging divides, sometimes integrating. Work of this type interests established and emerging artists alike, from Michael Gordon’s recent City Symphonies to projects by collectives such as squib-box and London Topophobia. Such work gives rise to a number of questions: how are the composer and the act of composing redefined in this context; can interdisciplinary work be facilitated/led and, if so, how; what is the role of technology; is the notion of interdisciplinarity one that concerns artists who work outside the academy; what kinds of new interdisciplines are emerging?

The seminar will address these questions from different perspectives and through different activities: we will hear from leaders of arts organisations and academic units, artists and artist-researchers; activities will include panel discussions, a workshop and a keynote address. A plenary session will draw out emerging themes from the day but we are keen to involve delegates throughout in order to increase our awareness of the state of play amongst artists/musicians working between disciplines. Delegates will play a vital role in extending the size of the network and the breadth of practice and theory it is able to encompass.

Participants include composers Helen Chadwick and Eduardo Miranda, sound artists Cathy Lane and Paul Whitty, Susanna Eastburn (Chief Executive, Sound and Music), Vanessa Read (Executive Director, PRS for Music Foundation) and Rebecca Hoyle (Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Southampton and former director of the interdisciplinary MILES programme at the University of Surrey). Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice is a collaboration between Surrey, York and Oxford Brookes universities and is run jointly by Tom Armstrong and Ambrose Field.

We invite practitioners (both freelance and working from universities), academics, arts administrators (particularly with small and medium sized organisations), promoters, curators, arts funders and educators. As the first event in the network’s schedule of activities the seminar can help shape its direction and generate exciting possibilities for future work.


09.30 registration

10.00 welcome by Tom Armstrong

10.15 panel session: leading/facilitating interdisciplinarity

11.45 workshop: vocal theatre techniques

13.15 lunch

14.15 panel session: interdisciplinary practices – states of play

15.00 keynote: Professor Cathy Lane (University of the Arts London, Director of CRISAP)

16.15 plenary session

There is no registration fee, lunch and refreshments will be provided. If you would like to attend please email Tom Armstrong (the principal investigator) at by Thursday 14th January together with your full name, area of activity/interest, institutional affiliation (if relevant) and any special dietary requirements.

Bodies of Art: Music, Literature, and Disability

Bodies of Art: Music, Literature, and Disability

Deadline for receipt of materials is October 1, 2015.

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Misericordia University (Dallas, PA)

The Department of Fine Arts and the Department of English at Misericordia University invite submissions of paper and panel proposals (3-4 speakers) that address the theme: Bodies of Art: Music, Literature, and Disability. As part of the university’s Medical and Health Humanities initiative, this interdisciplinary conference seeks to bring together scholars of musicology, literature, and related disciplines for a one-day symposium that investigates issues related to:

  • Specific representations of disability throughout music and literature, including works by disabled and nondisabled artists
  • Scientific, anthropological, and vernacular images of disability and how they have influenced music and literature
  • Performance in the everyday lives of disabled individuals
  • Theorizing disability through the arts
  • Narratives of illness and disability
  • Examples of music/literature that represent and/or challenge stereotypes of disability
  • Mental illness and creativity
  • Accessibility
  • (Ab)normalizing Literature, Music, and Thought
  • Other topics related to the conference theme.

Papers that are interdisciplinary in nature are especially welcome.

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) should include: 1) full name, contact information, institutional affiliation; 2) Short bio (no more than 150 words); and 3) an abstract of no more than 300 words.

Proposals for themed sessions should include: 1) full name, contact information, and institutional affiliation of all participants; 2) Short bio of all participants; 3) an abstract of no more than 700 words that summarizes the content of each contributor as well as a description of how the papers relate.

Submit completed proposals in a Word (.doc/.docx) format to: Dr. Ryan Weber AND Dr. Amanda Caleb .

Participants will be notified of their acceptance by November 1, 2015. Conference fee of $50 provides for breakfast, lunch, and dinner as well as admission to the evening concert.