Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century

International Conference.  Corfu, Greece, 17-19 November 2017

2017 marks for opera in Greece four anniversaries: the centenary since the passing of Spiros Samaras (1861-1917), the bicentenary since the birth of two important Greek opera composers, Spiridon Xyndas (1817-1896) and Domenikos Padovas (1817-1892), as well as the 150 years since the premiere of the opera O ypopsifios [The Parliamentary Candidate] (1867, music by Xyndas and libretto by Ioannis Rinopoulos), which was both the first full-scale opera in Greek and the pivotal point for the emergence of opera in Greek language.

The Hellenic Music Research Lab of the Music Department of the Ionian University and Corfu Philharmonic Society on the occasion of the aforementioned anniversaries organize the international conference entitled Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century, which is going to take place in Corfu, Greece, on 17, 18 and 19 November 2017.

Corfu, the seat of the Ionian University, was the birthplace of the three aforementioned composers. The San Giacomo theatre of Corfu, the earliest theatrical stage of the region, hosted opera performances already since 1733, contributing decisively to the dissemination of opera within the Greek world during 19th century. Moreover, Xyndas, Padovas and Samaras presented in the same theatre their operas. Xyndas in 1840 was also one of the initial founders and professors of the Corfu Philharmonic Society and he dedicated to it certain of his operas. Padovas also taught harmony and music theory in the Philharmonic, in 1857 he dedicated to it his opera Dirce and since 1884 he was appointed the Society’s artistic director. Samaras, a student of Xyndas during his early music training, had multiple connections with the Philharmonic Society and had been its honorary artistic director since 1889.

Given the above, the conference will not be confined solely to the lives and the works of the aforementioned composers, but it will focus on matters regarding the place, the reception, the importance and the formative factors of the operatic activity within the Greek world during the “long nineteenth century”. With these in mind, some indicative themes of the conference are proposed to be;

  • Spiros Samaras: life and work
  • Spiridon Xindas: life and work
  • Domenikos Padovas: life and work
  • The activities of the Italian opera troupes in the Greek areas (singers, musicians, impresarios, repertory etc)
  • The activities of the French opera troupes in the Greek areas
  • The activities of the Greek opera troupes
  • Opera in the Greek communities of Diaspora (Trieste, Odessa, Alexandria, Smyrna, Constantinople etc)
  • Opera in the Greek urban centres
  • Institutions of operatic activity
  • The reception of opera in the Greek world
  • Subjects related to Greece in the 19th-century opera

The official languages of the opera are GreekItalian and English.

Scholars and researchers interested to participate in the conference are asked to submit their abstracts (250 words) and short biographical notes (100 words) for papers of no more than 20 minutes. Themed sessions of 60 minutes can also be proposed (Abstract of 450 words and Bios of 100 words).

There are no fees for the participation or the attendance of the conference.

The final date for the proposals’ submission is 31 December 2016.

The abstracts and the biographical notes should be sent until the above date in the following email: operaconfcorfu2017@gmail.com
The Official website of the conference is: http://users.ionio.gr/~GreekMus/operaconf2017/eng.htm
The conference’s programme will be finalized by 1 March 2017.

Programme Committee
Prof. Haris Xanthoudakis
Prof. Anastasia Siopsi
A. Prof. Panos Vlagopoulos
A. Professor Avra Xapapadakou

Organizing Committee
Spiridon Padovas
Kostas Kardamis
Kostas Sambanis
Stella Kourbana
Alexandros Charkiolakis
Gerasimos Martinis

VIRTUAL WORKS – ACTUAL THINGS

International Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016
4-6 April 2016, Orpheus Institute Ghent, BE
The Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016 will focus on the relation between the virtual multiplicities that enable an imaginary perception of musical works and the actual, concrete materials and practices that make such imaginary constructions possible. With the contribution of a most distinguished faculty, the event will give room for discussion on recent developments that are challenging the debate around the work-concept (Lydia Goehr), the question of the autonomy of music (Gunnar Hindrichs), the canonical tendency of past musical pieces (Andreas Dorschel), new ontologies (David Davies), the potentialities emerging from editorial and performative practices (John Rink), and a new image of work inspired by the notion of multiplicity and pointing towards a domain specific assemblage theory (Paulo de Assis, convenor).image Academy2016.jpg
In our globalized and hyper-mediatized culture, musical works are currently determined by Western consumers and profit-oriented professional performers rather than by transhistorical creative and productive processes. A renewed gaze upon the innumerable things that actually enable the here-and-now appearance of musical works (drafts, sketches, manuscripts, editions, recordings, comments, instruments, analysis, etc.) opens up wider horizons for reflection and, crucially, for future practices.

Faculty

With the contribution of a most distinguished faculty, the Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016 will discuss recent developments that are challenging the debate around the work-concept (Goehr), the question of the autonomy of music (Hindrichs), the canonical tendency of past musical pieces (Dorschel), new ontologies (Davies), the potentialities emerging from editorial and performative practices (Rink), and a new image of work inspired by the notion of multiplicity and pointing towards
a domain specific assemblage theory (Assis).

  • Lydia Goehr, Columbia University, New York, US
  • David Davies, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Andreas Dorschel, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz (KUG), Graz, Austria
  • Gunnar Hindrichs, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
  • John Rink, St John’s College, Cambridge, UK

Academy convenor

Paulo de Assis

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

Gesellschaft für Tanzforschung · GTF Annual Conference 2016 · Call for papers

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

November 18–20, 2016 · Orff-Institute of the University Mozarteum/Salzburg

The term TRACES has been positioned very intentionally between the two central artistic means of expression SOUNDS and MOVES, as interface so to speak, since sounds as well as bodily movements can both be regarded as traces due to their volatility in space and time. They can enter into a dialog with other artistic traces (of movement), such as the grand brushstroke of a painter, the fine drawings of a graphic artist or the light projections of a digital installation, in order to access further dimensions of space and time for the hearing and seeing of movement dynamics. Against this backdrop, an (in the best sense) endlessly creative process gathers momentum, in which audible and/or visible movement traces are permanently recreated, without ever getting clearly defined contours nor even taking a definite shape.

What kinds of artistic options are possible due to such interactions between sound- and movement traces, either in the form of a performance or an event? And what kinds of challenges result from this for the spectators/listeners – particularly if these interactions primarily unfold within the area of the non-verbal, beyond the obvious allocations of meaning or outstanding narrative threads? This conference will discuss perspectives based on (rehearsal) processes and production aesthetics as well as questions relating to the perception of the interplay of analogue/digital, instrumental/ vocal and musical or noise-like sounds with virtual or real body movements in choreographies, improvisations and dance performances: The objective is to ‘trace’ audio-visual movement traces and the resulting network of sensory impressions.

Deadline for proposals for lectures, workshops, poster presentations, lecture demonstrations, performances and labs (please give the preferred format) is May 1.

Please send the respective proposal with a maximum of 250 words and a short biography of 100 words at most to Stephanie Schroedter: st.schroedter@t-online.de

You will be informed about the programme selection by June 1, 2016 at the latest.
For more information look at: http://www.gtf-tanzforschung.de

XXIII Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society

XXIII ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF ITALIAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY

 

Como, Conservatory of music “Giuseppe Verdi”, 21-23 October 2016

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The twenty-third Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society will be hosted in Como from 21th-23rd October, in collaboration with the Conservatory of music “Giuseppe Verdi”. On October 22nd at 3 p.m. the annual Meeting of all members will take place.

 

The Conference will be divided into free paper sessions.

 

Scholars from all over the world are invited to submit their proposals.

 

In your abstract (which has not to exceed 30 lines in word format) please indicate the title of the proposed paper, the state of the art in your research field, with an outline of the project and the specific contribution to the current knowledge. Only original, unpublished research will be taken into consideration: papers in print will not be accepted.

 

Along with the text please send also a short C/V (max. 15 lines) and indicate the A/V equipment required.

 

The paper shall not exceed 20 minutes in duration (corresponding to an 8-page text containing to a maximum of 16000 characters). Scholars are not allowed to send more than one abstract. The abstracts have to be sent to the e-mail address convegni@sidm.it or – by mail – to the Società Italiana di Musicologia, Casella Postale 318 Ag. Roma Acilia, via Saponara 00125 Rome, Italy (please add on the envelope the indication “XXIII Convegno annuale”) no later than June 15, 2016. Acceptance of papers will be notified by July, 15, 2016.

 

We inform you that one session of the conference will be entitled “From the Belle Epoque to the First World War: in search for a Musical Identity”, and based on the topics exposed in the book “Italia 1911. Musica e società alla fine della Belle Époque” (Milano, Guerini Associati, 2014).

 

Please provide your full name, address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address. For further information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.sidm.it.

Choral practice, performance and pedagogy: real world applications of choral research

CALL FOR PAPERS

Department of Music, The University of Sheffield, in partnership with the Institute of Musical Research.

Friday 8th April 2016.

This one-day, interactive choral conference is being convened in the Department of Music at the University of Sheffield, with funding from The Institute of Musical Research. The aim of the event is to provide a forum for researchers to present their work on choral practice, performance and pedagogy. This conference is designed to provide opportunities for demonstrating the impact of current research in a way which emphasizes practical applications alongside pedagogical approaches to choral rehearsal and performance.

Submissions are invited for sessions with a strong participatory element, and potential for a high level of audience engagement. Proposals from Early Career Researchers are particularly encouraged (see below for details of a limited number of travel bursaries which may be awarded to  eligible ECRs).

Sessions may take the form of practical demonstrations, masterclasses, performances or workshops (45 minutes maximum), which are related to the presenter’s original research, or which interrogate choral concepts and philosophies derived from the researcher’s review of the literature. Subjects may include:

  • Choral leadership and conductor training
  • Group dynamics in the choral context
  • Choral learning processes and rehearsal strategies
  • Choral repertoire and performance practices
  • Choral inclusion and diversity
  • Topics related to community singing or community projects involving group singing activities

Shorter spoken papers (20 minutes, including 5 minutes for questions) are also invited, preferably including a practical, participatory or performance element. Subjects for round-table discussions or panels (30 minutes maximum) may also be suggested, with the aim of sharing knowledge, experience, research findings and potential applications among participants. Presentations, demonstrations and workshops may be related to research on group singing in any context, and to any type or size of choral ensemble. A repertoire exchange will be included in the programme, so delegates will be encouraged to bring a song or vocal warm up to share.

Bursaries for Early Career Researchers: There will be a limited number of travel bursaries, funded by the Institute of Musical Research, to assist ECRs to present their work at this conference. Applications for bursaries are encouraged from ECRs who are within three years of completing their PhD, and who do not hold an academic post which provides access to conference funding.

Bursary applications should include:

  • A note of the applicant’s PhD completion date
  • Confirmation that the applicant does not currently have access to funding for conference attendance
  • An accurate indication of the travel costs that will be involved in attending this conference
  • A short biography (c. 200 words)

Submissions: Please send abstracts (c. 300 words), along with applications for travel bursaries, to Dr Michael Bonshor: m.bonshor@sheffield.ac.uk.

The closing date for submissions and bursary applications is January 15th 2016. All proposals should include the name and email address of the presenter, institutional affiliation (if applicable), and details of any AV requirements for the session.

Arts Without Borders? Perspectives on Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in and through the Arts

 

Call for Papers

Arts Without Borders? Perspectives on Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in and through the Arts

An international conference hosted by the University of the Arts Helsinki and CERADA (Center for Educational Research and Academic Development in the Arts), Finland

October 19-22, 2016

We are experiencing a renaissance in the power of the arts, even where political will is lacking. Artists increasingly make their own futures and work collaboratively across disciplines. Dimensions of creativity and innovation, empowered learning, distributed and ethical leadership, and entrepreneurship and activism, all of which are embedded within artistic practices, are being recognized as critical to contemporary societies in diverse ways. At the same time arts institutions in Higher Education, many of which have operated as small organizations focused on a single discipline, are starting to merge and to collaborate at interdisciplinary levels. This trend raises many questions about purpose and principles, and indeed in some contexts arts organisations are resisting pressures to merge, seeing these being driven by finance and bureaucracy, and perceiving a threat to their own core purpose and quality.

This international conference will explore the potential and challenges of interdisciplinarity, and the full scope of the performing and visual arts in discovering new territories and evolving beyond existing paradigms. Through the event we aim to set agendas and mobilize global networks, generating dialogue and exchange between researchers, arts practitioners, and professionals from a wide range of disciplines including education, psychology, health care, organizational management and leadership.

Conference themes

  • Collaborative processes, conflict and leadership: leveraging individual and collective expertise, empowering new knowledge and enabling the full potential of the arts
  • Improvisation, creativity and innovation: exploring tensions between traditional and contemporary practices, notated repertoire and making new work.
  • Connecting the arts beyond their own disciplines: new visions for breaking through professional silos and embracing diversity
  • Rethinking paradigms of purpose in the arts: dimensions of quality, entrepreneurship, impact and activism

Keynotes

Efva Lilja, choreographer http://www.efvalilja.se

Helen Marriage, director, Artichoke http://www.artichoke.uk.com

(The full list of keynotes will be announced at a later date).

We welcome the following categories of proposals related to the Conference themes

  1. Research papers & performance papers
  2. Practical workshops
  3. Symposia
  4. Individually tailored proposals

The deadline to submit an abstract proposal is January 11, 2016

All outcomes will be known by March 14, 2016

Proposals for papers will be peer reviewed and proposals for performances and workshops will be included on the basis of quality, engagement and relevance to the strands. Abstracts should be written in English, and should be around 400 words.

Conference Organising Committee            University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland

  • Professor Helena Gaunt Sibelius Academy
  • Patrick Furu Sibelius Academy
  • Professor Heidi Westerlund Sibelius Academy
  • Kai Lehikoinen Theatre Academy
  • Professor Riikka Stewen Academy of Fine Arts

(Full Peer Review Scientific Committee to be confirmed)

Please find the proposal guidelines on the Conference website and submit your abstract using the electronic form provided:

http://www.uniarts.fi/arts-without-borders

For further details please contact: Katja Thomson katja.thomson@uniarts.fi

 

 

 

 

Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice

Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice

A two-day symposium at the University of York, UK. 28-29 June 2016

Please note: call for papers extended to Monday 4th April with notification of acceptance by Friday 29th April.

Submissions are invited for this event hosted by Music Composition as Interdisciplinary Practice, a research network of practitioners and practitioner-researchers funded by the AHRC.

Contemporary practices in music appear to be increasingly foregrounding interdisciplinary approaches either from individual artists or collaborators. Compositional activity in all its guises – sonic art, notation-based instrumental music, the myriad forms of electronic music, music in the theatre, music for dance, film and so on – may be conceived as a nexus where the practices of different disciplines can connect in various ways, overlapping, bridging, or integrating. The above research network has been established to investigate this area of practice: what kinds of interdisciplinarity are in evidence here, how are these practices organised/facilitated/led, how is such work created and what might this knowledge add to understandings of artistic creativity?

With these questions in mind the organisers are seeking to gather a broad range of perspectives on interdisciplinary practices involving composition including, but not limited to, historical, interpretative, analytical, philosophical and practice-based viewpoints. We welcome proposals that critique notions of interdisciplinarity and that originate from any disciplinary background (for example artists working compositionally for whom music may not be their ‘home’ discipline).

There are three presentation formats available:

Paper (20 minutes)

Lecture-performance (30 minutes)

Workshop (30 minutes)

Proposals should include the following details:

presenter(s) name(s)

institutional affiliation(s) where appropriate

title of paper/lecture-performance/workshop

300-word abstract

for lecture/performances and workshops please include a full list of technical requirements and please describe the format of the workshop

Please send your proposals to Tom Armstrong: t.armstrong@surrey.ac.uk by Monday 21st March 2016. You will be notified of the outcome by 18th April.

MVSA Conference April 2016 – Victorian News: Print Culture and the Periodical Press

The Midwest Victorian Studies Association will hold its 2016 annual conference at the University of Missouri–Columbia, April 8-10. Taking as its starting point the remarkable explosion in the periodical press and the availability of cheap print in the Victorian Era, the conference aims to attract papers that reflect fresh and current thinking about the topic. Proposals for papers of twenty minutes in length are sought from scholars working in art history, musicology, history, science, philosophy, theater, and literature. We particularly encourage presentations that will contribute to cross-disciplinary discussion, a special feature of MVSA conferences.

The official call for papers is now closed, but the seminar CFP has been extended to January 20, 2016.  MVSA Conference seminars are open to graduate students, faculty and independent scholars.  Participants will write 5-7-page papers, to be pre-circulated among other seminar participants in advance.  Members will identify important points of intersection and divergence, as well as future areas of inquiry and collaboration.  The seminar format allows a larger number of scholars to participate in MVSA and to seek financial support from their respective institutions.  Seminars are limited to 12 participants.  All seminar proposals should be submitted via email directly to the seminar leaders by January 20, 2016.  See the full seminar CFP here.

The three seminar topics and leaders are:

Print Culture and the Mass Public: Dissemination and Democratization (Leader, Julie Codell, School of Art, Arizona State University)

Finding/Creating a Voice in the Periodical Press (Leader, Leanne Langley, IMR Lifetime Fellow, University of London)

The Transatlantic Periodical Press (Leader, Jennifer Phegley, Department of English, University of Missouri – Kansas City)

For further information, including a range of possible topics across the full conference, see the 2016 Conference website here.

 

 

 

 

 

Musical Cartographies

Musical Cartographies: The Harvard Graduate Music Forum Conference, 2016

29-30 January 2016

Harvard University Department of Music
Cambridge, MA

Keynote: Arun Saldanha (University of Minnesota)

Call for Proposals

This interdisciplinary conference investigates the relationship between music and the organization of space. Approaching the topic from the perspectives of both scholarly inquiry and creative practice, we will ask how music has been implicated in mappings of physical and conceptual spaces and how spatial mappings have functioned as ways of thinking about musical sound.

Topics for consideration include but are not limited to:

Geography, power, and identity:

  • How have historically and culturally contingent geographical formations conditioned music’s production, dissemination, and reception?
  • How does music intersect with geographically-mediated categories such as race, nation, and ecology?
  • How do issues of diaspora, migration, and stateless peoples complicate the relationships we draw between music and geography?

Representations of sound, time, and musical form:

  • How have music-theoretical models mapped domains such as pitch, timbre, and gesture?
  • How is map-and path- making implicated in music cognition and the phenomenology of listening, and how might models such as cognitive mapping shed light on these processes?
  • How might we think of musical notation and other visual representations of music as forms of cartography?

Practices and technologies:

  • How do scholars and creative practitioners draw and contest disciplinary, aesthetic and conceptual boundaries—for instance, between academic fields, between art forms, or between the “musical” or “extra-musical”?
  • How do composers, performers, and sound artists creatively organize the physical and conceptual spaces in which they work?
  • How have technologies been implicated in mapping musical spaces, and how have new media technologies altered the shape, nature, and limits of such spaces?

Submissions
We welcome submissions from current graduate students exploring these issues from the perspectives of both research and practice. We seek proposals on all repertoires, musical practices, and historical periods from a broad array of disciplinary and methodological perspectives.

Formats for presentation include:

  • 20-minute papers, audiovisual presentations, or exploratory text works, with 10 minutes for discussion
    Please submit abstracts of a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, up to 4 additional pages for figures. Please add a short statement regarding AV requirements.
  • 30-minute composers’ colloquia, performances, or lecture-recitals, with 15 minutes for discussion
    Please submit details of the work to be presented in a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, links to downloads (via Dropbox, WeTransfer, Google Drive etc.) of relevant sound recordings, scores, and/or supplementary documentation.

In addition to the above questions, composers and performers might consider:

  • What role does space play in your conceptualization of musical form? In your approach to musical performance?
  • What is mapped during composition or performance? This could include time, coincidence, relationships, physical space, and other parameters.
  • How do you relate in your work to geographical categories such as race, nation, and ecology? Likewise, how do you relate to conceptual boundaries such as those between genres, art forms, or historical periods?
  • How do your creative practices challenge existing ways of mapping musical sound?

Deadline for the proposal: 17 November 2015

Please send submissions to: harvardgmf2016@gmail.com

For more information, please visit: http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gmf2016/home

What does democracy sound like? Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

International Conference, 5th-7th November 2015, Philharmonie de Paris

Partners:
L’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris (Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage & Centre Georg Simmel); Centre Marc Bloch Berlin; Palazzetto Bru Zane Venice; Center for Worldmusic Hildesheim; Philharmonie de Paris

With the question ‘What does democracy sound like?’, this jointly organised German-French conference intends to open up a space for discussing conceptions and potential functions of music within democratic societies. In research, relations between music and politics were especially closely intertwined thought in official representations of feudal societies and in the context of the ideological instrumentalization of music in totalitarian regimes. Considering this, it appears that the relationship between music and politics can carry dangerous, or at least problematic implications. This relationship seems to be also difficult with regard to the (unquestioned) necessity of autonomy and the principle of artistic freedom. In contrast to this stands the positive power of music, as represented by its potential for use in resistance, protest and liberation movements and its mobilization within processes of community and identity building. Instead of viewing these differing perspectives as contradictory, this conference aims to consider them as an expression of the complexity of the relationships between musical practices and diverse conceptions of collective action and social groupings.

In both historical and anthropological approaches, various forms of musical practices, discourses and social groupings (state, regional and local communities, clubs and interest groups etc.) within democratic societies come into consideration here:

How can it, for example, be explained that music often acts as a means of representing a society as being free and equal, i.e. as a medium for the shaping of society? What prerequisites and intentions underlie the understanding of music as social ‘common property’? In how far are different actors/experts (researchers, members of various interest groups or also militant associations) involved in the process of legitimating state intervention in various musical spheres (artistic production, mediation, education, construction of musical spaces)? Also to be discussed are terms such as ‘culture’, ‘music’, ‘society’, ‘the people’ etc., which struggle for definitionwithin the continualinterplay of societal legitimation and contradiction. Musical practice, when viewed in relation to the term ‘democracy’–which shouldalso be problematized with regardtoits social and political processes of mediation – demands an openness of approach. Indeed, the term ‘democracy’ is instinctively connected to unifying societal ideals and political norms, yet the practical implementation of this concept clearly varies according to time and place.

In order to bring this variation to attention, the conference will take on a longue duréeperspective and trace ideas of democratic thinking in music – with its continuities and gaps – from its first appearance (late 18th/early 19th century) up to the present day. The examples of France and Germany can be taken as a starting point but the focus should by no means be restricted to them. Rather, points of reference between different countries and cultural contexts should be drawn upon and produced.

On the basis of these initial questions, contributions to one or more of the following key areas are welcome:

Music and State: music-related cultural and educational policies; debates on societal representation and participation; institutionalization processes; etc.

History of Ideas: historical milestones in the development of concepts of ‘music and democracy’; processes of mobilization and stabilization as well as controversies surrounding related concepts (musical autonomy, representation, cultural diversity, etc.); the construction of musical hierarchies and genres; etc.

Creativity and Politics: debates on the definition and diversity of the terms ‘culture’ and ‘music’ from the viewpoint of artists (social culture, culture for everyone, etc.); conceptions of society and politics that underlie musical practices; politically motivated music; etc.

Space and Reception: construction of musical spaces and events in democratic societies (concert halls, festivals, conservatoires, radio, etc.); social and symbolic dimensions of architectonic conceptions and localizations in space; debates on social responsibility and the financing of musical spaces and events; etc.

Musical Publics: practices and contexts of listening and reception; concepts of ‘the public’ (elite, mainstream, masses, listeners, audiences, fans, etc.); means of constructing and representing the public (statistics, expert studies, market analysis, self-organization, medialization); etc.

By inviting contributions that concern themselves with various historical and geographic situations and that are orientated around different points of access to the topic (different actors, institutions, practices, discourses), the conference intends to open a forum in which the variety of perspectives on this theme can be taken into account. The aim is to consider the relationship between music and politics in all its complexities and different manifestations in democratic societies.

Contributions from a broad range of humanities and social science disciplines are welcome (History, Anthropology, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Political Sciences, Sociology, DevelopmentalStudies/Pedagogy, Theatre Studies, etc.).
The conference languages are French, German and English.

Proposals (abstract max. 2000 characters, CV max. 500 characters) should be sent by 15th May 2015 at the latest to the following address: musikdemokratie@gmail.com.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30th June 2015 and the conference programme published online at http://www.musikdemokratie.wordpress.com.
We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Members of the scientific committee:

Philip Bohlman, Esteban Buch, Annegret Fauser, Wolfgang Fuhrmann, Antoine Hennion, Denis Laborde, Karine Le Bail, Julio Mendívil, Olivier Roueff, Patrice Veit, Raimund Vogels, Sarah Zalfen, Hansjakob Ziemer

Organizers:

Talia Bachir-Loopuyt (Université Jean-Monnet), Etienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru-Zane), Christina Kaps (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Elsa Rieu (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris), Lena van der Hoven (Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung)