Music – Musicology – Interpretation

XV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSICOLOGY,
UNIVERSITY OF ARTS IN BELGRADE, FACULTY OF MUSIC

Belgrade, 21 to 23 October 2021

The Department of Musicology of the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, has decided to postpone the Conference due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Conference will take place in Belgrade from 21 to 23 October 2021. The organizers of this conference will make contingency plans for an online event, in case an in-person gathering is not possible, because of the continuing uncertainties arising from the COVID-19 pandemic.

A second call for paper is open now, until 15 March 2021; decisions and notifications are re-scheduled for 1 May 2021. Those papers that have already been accepted will be programmed as a matter of course. Details are available on the website. Further information about the conference will also follow in due time.

CONFERENCE CALL

The Department of Musicology of the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, is pleased to announce its Fifteenth International Conference on the topic Music–Musicology–Interpretation.

The subject of the conference Music-Musicology-Interpretation focuses on the complex and multifaceted relationships between the constituent concepts. It proposes to re-examine these multiple relations by thematizing, from the point of view of interpretation, music as language, discourse, work of art and text, the performance of music and the discourse on music – musicology itself.

Musical hermeneutics as a discipline is today the focus of musicological interest. During the last three decades of the 20th century, it developed in parallel with research into musical semiotics and, as the influence of “pure” structural analysis was waning, it became an important current of thought about music at the beginning of the 21st century. Its renewal in relation to the legacy of the 19th century was partly due to interpretive criticism in Anglo-Saxon literature but also to the works of Carl Dahlhaus in the 1970s and 1980s. Next come researchers into hermeneutics and interpretive criticism and analysis, each with a different orientation in their individual pathways and objects of study, most of whom are still active today: Joseph Kerman, Nicholas Cook, Leo Treitler, Lawrence Kramer, Robert Hatten, Eero Tarasti, Jean-Jacques Nattiez, Michel Imberty, Bernard Vecchione, Christian Hauer, Makis Solomos…

In his Peri Hermeneias, Aristotle established an equality between “sounds emitted by the voice” and symbolic language, that is, meaningful language: “The sounds emitted by the voice are the symbols of the states of the soul, and the written words the symbols of words emitted by the voice” (Peri Hermeneias, 1 / 16a /). Being symbolic, signifying language is thus equated with interpretive language, mediating the relation of the transmitter “of the voice” to the things of the world, with the written language then constituted as a double mediation: of the spoken language and the things themselves. This chain of consecutive “interpretations-appropriations” (Ricœur, From Text to Action, 1986) thus recalls a chain of musical interpretations: the things of the world (the world of life, being-in-the-world– the music (discourse, work of art, text) – the performance of music – the discourse on music, projecting, through the hermeneutical arc, into a new being-in-the-world, as an understanding of oneself in front of signs (Ricœur, ibid).

This chain allows us to problematize the relationship between music, discourse on music and interpretation on several levels.

At the methodological level, it enables us to re-examine the position of musicological interpretive criticism in relation to primary research, technical analysis and structural explanation, on the one hand, and the “new musicology”, on the other, and, at the disciplinary level, to re-examine the position of and relationship between musical hermeneutics and structuralism, as well as semiotics. In both cases, the question can be raised as to whether the structural explanation of the musical work or the explanation of the signs of culture, on the one hand, and interpretation, on the other, are mutually exclusive, or whether a methodological reconciliation is possible in the sense of the mediating role of explanation in the process of understanding, explanation and understanding being integrated into the interpretive chain.

At the poetic level, it allows us to reopen the question of the interpretive character of the musical work/discourse/text itself as the “voice emitted”, thus already the symbolic voice, and then to re-problematize the relationship between musical language and meaning, reference, representation, narrativity and time. In this sense, another question can be posed, namely how the specific abilities of music can help shed light on the interpretive process and the contemporary hermeneutical task in general. Also related to this is the problematics of the historicity of musical hermeneutics / musical interpretation, as well as the problematics of the interpretive discourse on music in history and as history. The issue of the subjectivity and objectivity of the discourse on music and music itself is part of the old debate but it lends itself to reconsideration in relation to music as a “thing” (L. Kramer) and the work of interpretation as event, action, dynamism, creation, production. The notion of metaphor, extracted as a key concept in different conceptualizations by many authors, musicologists and philosophers, is also proposed for examination: as a musical metaphor (at the poetic level) and as a metaphor in the discourse on music.

As a link in the interpretive process, the performance of a musical score as “appropriation” and actualization of a musical text, as a realization of its meaning in another “voice”, offers itself to examination, testifying to the opening of the musical work, discourse and text. In that sense, when it comes to interpreting music from the aspect of performing practice, it is understood as something much more than a mere reproduction of the score in sound. The variable roles of the music performer throughout history represent different social, cultural, stylistic, etc. conditions under which music is understood. In all these different approaches to a work of music, it is implicitly indicated that all of its incidences and meaningful transformations are only achieved by the performance.

The position of the listener in the interpretive process can be approached from several angles: semantic, psychological, narrative. Does the interpretive process not in fact end in the effectuation of the sense in the discourse (tacit or explicit, oral or written) of the listener who has passed through the musical interpretive chain?

Referring to the aforementioned findings, the following topics could be considered:

  • Interpretive criticism in musicology versus primary research and the “new musicology”
  • Musical hermeneutics versus semiotics and structural analysis of music
  • Musical hermeneutics / interpretation in history and as history
  • Musical work / discourse / text as interpretation
  • Musical language and meaning, reference, representation, narrativity and time
  • Musical metaphor and metaphor in the discourse on music
  • Subjectivity and objectivity in musical interpretation
  • Music and / as performance
  • Musical performance and / as analysis of music
  • Historically informed performance as a field of recreation of the past
  • The listener as interpreter

Please submit your paper topic (including the thematic area as listed above) to Ivana Petković Lozo at e-mail address: muzikologija@fmu.bg.ac.rs

The submission deadline is March 15th, 2021.

Please include your short biography and an abstract of 250 words. You will be notified by 1 May, 2021 if your topic has been accepted.

The official language of the conference is English. It is possible to deliver papers also in German, French, Russian, and Serbian, but the authors are kindly requested to provide a Power-Point presentation in English or the translation of their papers in English. The time limit for the presentation and discussion of your paper is set at 30 minutes in total. Selected papers presented at the conference will be published in the proceedings.

Conference fee: Both participation at the Conference and the publication of a text whose topic has been accepted by the Programme Committee are conditional upon the payment of the participation fee. The travel expenses, per diem expenses and hotel accommodation are to be covered by the participants. The fee can be paid on the spot or with PayPal (120€; early bird, deadline June 15th, 2020: 100€; PhD candidates: 50€). Participants will be notified about PayPal payments instructions.

More about conference, themes and participation you may find at conference web site https://musicmusicologyinterpretation2020.wordpress.com/

Keynote Speakers:

Danielle Cohen-Levinas
Professor of Musicology and Philosophy
Université Paris 4 / ENS-CNRS, France

Robert S. Hatten
Marlene & Morton Meyerson Professor in Music
Professor of Music Theory
Sarah and Ernest Butler School of Music
The University of Texas at Austin, USA (TBC)

Lawrence Kramer
Distinguished Professor of English and Music
Fordham University, USA

Makis Solomos
Professor of Musicology
Université Paris 8, France

Eero Tarasti
Professor emeritus of Musicology
The University of Helsinki, Finland

Programme Committee:

Professor Antonio Baldassarre, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Suisse
Professor Danielle Cohen-Levinas, Université Paris 4 / ENS-CNRS, France
Associate Professor Paulo Ferreira de Castro, CESEM – Nova FCSH, Portugal
Professor Robert S. Hatten, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Distinguished Professor Lawrence Kramer, Fordham University, USA
Associate Professor Marija Masnikosa, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Ivana Perković, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Tijana Popović Mladjenović, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Makis Solomos, Université Paris 8, France
Professor Irina Susidko, Gnesins Russian Academy of Music in Moscow, Russia
Professor Leon Stefanija, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Professor Ana Stefanović, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Dragana Stojanović-Novičić, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor emeritus Eero Tarasti, University of Helsinki, Finland
Academician, Professor emeritus Stanislav Tuksar, HAZU/University of Zagreb, Croatia
Professor Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia

Organizing Committee:

Stefan Cvetković, PhD candidate, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Marina Marković, PhD candidate, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Ivana Miladinović-Prica, PhD, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Radoš Mitrović, PhD, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Ivana Petković Lozo, PhD, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Neda Nestorović, PhD candidate, Research Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Milica Petrović, PhD candidate, Junior Researcher, University of Arts in Belgrade
Marija Simonović, PhD candidate, Research Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Maša Spaić, PhD student, Junior Researcher, University of Arts in Belgrade
Marija Tomić, PhD student, Junior Researcher, University of Arts in Belgrade

Beethoven the European

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca, in collaboration with Ad Parnassum. A Journal of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Instrumental Music, is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Beethoven the European», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 27 to 29 March 2020.

Keynote Speakers:
Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)
William Kinderman (University of California, Los Angeles)

Beethoven’s impact is widely recognised as of seemingly universal, timeless significance; 250 years since his birth his music still communicates with and inspires people across the globe. Nevertheless his iconic, enduring oeuvre stems from a specific European cultural milieu and historical context. To what extent does the tension between the universality and particularity of Beethoven’s music give rise to a richer understanding of his music and its reception history?
Beethoven’s creative inspiration was nurtured in the European context of revolution and political reshaping, at the aesthetic turning-point from Enlightenment to Romanticism, and at the social turning-point from largely private patronage to a more market-orientated environment for composers.

Born in the German Rhineland and resident in Bonn and Vienna, he travelled little compared with contemporaries such as Mozart and Clementi, but his reputation quickly spread much further, to far-off countries such as Britain and Russia. His works attest to strong musical and ideological ties with France and England, and his stage works engage with scenarios in Spain, Hungary, the Netherlands and Greece, while his vocal works include settings in Latin, Italian, French, English and other languages as well as German. Beethoven’s intellectual outlook even extended beyond Europe, especially to Indian sources, reflecting European intellectual currents of his time. Clearly there is still much to discover about the way in which Beethoven’s music was both influenced by and in turn influenced European culture, as well as about the way Beethoven as a European has been perceived and interpreted in a wider context.

Our conference aims to explore the multivalent connections between Beethoven and Europe through multifaceted study of the music both in a European and, where relevant, a wider global multi-cultural context. We would encourage consideration of the theme through the intermingling of and interface between topics and sub-disciplines, text and music, analysis and interpretation, genesis and reception. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics related to the concept of ‘Beethoven and Europe’ are also welcome:

  • The European as complement or contrast to the Universal nature of Beethoven’s musical and/or personal identity
  • Connections with the forms, styles and influences of particular European countries or cultures
  • Setting of, and interest in texts in different languages
  • Dramatic works and their relation to historical contexts
  • Political attitudes reflected in works or words
  • Beyond Europe’s boundaries: Beethoven and Asia
  • Reception across Europe and in countries related to Europe
  • Historic performance as a means of understanding context, and as a basis for modern performance
  • Innovative analyses, sketch studies and reinterpretation of sources as a way to explore issues of the universal and particular
  • Dispersal of source material across European libraries and collections

Programme Committee:

  • Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • William Kinderman (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Malcolm Miller (The Open University, UK)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 13 October 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of October 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org