The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era. International Conference celebrating 475 Years of the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona

immagine della Santissima Vergine Maria di Loreto della Giara in Verona, Stamperia del Seminario, Padova 1714 Domenico Zanatta Venezia 1665 Verona 5 agosto 1748

Verona, 1-3 June 2018

Call for Papers 
Deadline for proposals: 31 December 2017

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era is an international conference organized by the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona on the occasion of the 475th anniversary of its foundation (23 May 1543), in collaboration with University of Verona, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, University of St Andrews and Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona.
Natural sequel to The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, 24-27 May 2017 – vmo.unive.it/soundscape2017), this further initiative has the aim of increasing debate on the varied soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the early modern period. This territory, which stretched from Bergamo in the west to the Friulian Alps in the north-east and the river Po at the Republic’s southern extremity, formed one of the three subdivisions of the Serenissima; the others were the Dogado (Venice and surrounding area) and the Stato da mar (Venetian possessions in the eastern Adriatic and Mediterranean areas). The articulate system that regulates musical and non-musical sound in the Venetian territories prior to the fall of the Serenissima in 1797 is highly conducive to an interdisciplinary approach which draws on the new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology. Emblematic, in this sense, are the activities of the Accademia Filarmonica, which have dominated almost five centuries of local musical history.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

The conference will take place in Verona from 1-3 June 2018.

Suggested topics: 
– Sound and urban identity
– The sound of local civic ceremonial and devotional activities
– Reciprocal influence of Venetian and Terraferma soundscapes
– Musical relationships between the Terraferma cities and the courts of northern Italy and elsewhere
– Music and society (patronage; academies and other musical institutions, private and public; private uses of music)
– Educational, philosophical and social dynamics in musical practice
– The sounds of public and private festivities
– Musical theatre in the Terraferma and its social impact
– Music, urban architecture and the visual arts
– Music and economics (music printing, production and commerce of musical instruments, the economics of performance)
– Sound as material and non-material cultural heritage

One session of the conference will be entirely dedicated to research on the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona.

Peer-reviewed contributions will be published in a dedicated volume, scheduled to appear in 2019.

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The programme committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, with 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Please email abstracts (max. 250 words), together with a short biography, to: biblioteca@academiafilarmonica.191.it

Further information will be available from September 2017 on the conference website, which will continue to be updated with details of costs, events and accommodation near the conference venue.

Accepted proposals will be announced before 16 February 2018.

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Organizing Committee: 
Alessandro Arcangeli (University of Verona)
Vincenzo Borghetti (University of Verona)
David Douglas Bryant (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)
Luigi Collarile (University of Geneva)
Michele Magnabosco (Accademia Filarmonica, Verona)
Laura Moretti (University of St Andrews)
Laura Och (Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona)

For further information please contact
Michele Magnabosco: biblioteca@accademiafilarmonica.191.it

http://www.accademiafilarmonica.org/filarmonica/en/convegno-internazionale-2018/

 

Rossini after Rossini: Musical and Social Legacy (1868-1918)

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Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini (Lucca)

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto
19 – 21 October 2018

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca is organizing the symposium «Rossini after Rossini: Musical and Social Legacy (1868-1918)», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from Friday 19 until Sunday 21 October 2018.

The influence of Rossini on his contemporaries has been and remains the subject of innumerable essays, conventions and publications. The story of the composer’s long life (1792-1868), initially focused on purely musical connections (Paganini, Giuliani,  Mercadante, Schubert, Donizetti, Bellini, Auber, Meyerbeer, Verdi, Offenbach, Bizet, just to name a few), has been expanded to include literary, philosophical and political dimensions (Stendhal, Balzac, Schopenhauer, Mazzini).
Less frequently investigated, however, is Rossini’s legacy as it unfolded during the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. On the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the composer’s death the present conference focuses on the span of time corresponding more-or-less to the fifty years following 1868, almost to the threshold of the so-called Rossini Renaissance that, beginning in the early 1920s, generated renewed interest into the composer’s output, from the points of view of both performance and philology, and also helped to clarify the ambiguity of Rossini as a man.
Topics of investigation include, but are not limited to, the  following:

• Rossinian influences on operetta in Paris, Vienna, London and Italy;
• Rossinian influence on subsequent opera composers;
• the theory and practice of Operatic Singing;
• aspects of orchestration and instrumentation;
• stylistic and compositional legacy;
• treatises and biographical memoires;
• literature and poetry;
• reception;
• Rossini and the cinema;
• Rossini, the vocal chamber music and the popular song;
• Rossini’s iconography and portraiture;
• Rossini in politics, society and public opinion.

Programme Committee:

• Lorenzo Frassà (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Federico Gon (Universität Wien)
• Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Arnold Jacobshagen (Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln)
• Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speaker:

• Arnold Jacobshagen (Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 29 April 2018*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the midst of May 2018, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Music for Liturgy and Devotion in Italy around 1600

Conference, Friday 4th November and Saturday 5th November 2016,
Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama, The University of Manchester

Keynote speakers:
Daniele V. Filippi (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis)
Noel O’Regan (Edinburgh College of Art)

New deadline for proposals: 4 September 2016

The decades around the turn of the seventeenth century were marked by a new religious self-consciousness developing within the Catholic world over the course of the latter part of the sixteenth century – usually associated with the Council of Trent and the Counter-Reformation but in fact fuelled by a great diversity of intellectual and religious currents which continue to fuel discussions among historians. Italy, besides being one of the main centres of the Catholic world, was home to an extremely rich musical culture, witnessing in the time around 1600 a huge variety of musical styles designated or adapted to enhance the practice of the faith. Large-scale polychoral works for the Tridentine liturgy existed side-by-side with the more intimate genres of musica spirituale which occasionally straddled the stylistic and functional boundaries to the secular realm.

Fascinatingly diverse, this repertoire has long offered a fruitful field of research for musicologists. However, given its chronological situation in a period transgressing the traditional epochal definitions, study of this music has struggled to find a ‘home’ in the standard historiographical discourse, resulting in a perceivable lack of opportunity for researchers working in this area to communicate their knowledge. This conference aims to respond to this need and to act as a forum of exchange for scholars working on Italian liturgical and devotional music in the decades around 1600.

We welcome proposals for papers in English of 20 minutes duration or performance workshops of 30 minutes. The proposals should include the title, an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biography (approx. 100 words). The extended deadline is 4 September 2016. Applicants will be notified by 15 September.

Submissions should be emailed to italianmusic1600@manchester.ac.uk

Inquiries can be directed to Rosemarie Darby and Ginte Medzvieckaite through the contact form on the conference website www.italianmusic1600.weebly.com or using the email address given above.

Music and Politics in Britain and Italy, 1933-1968

Call for Papers Deadline: 26 June 2012

King’s College London, UK, 13-14 September 2012

The aim of this conference is to bring together research students and early career scholars for a discussion of music and politics in the mid-twentieth century. From the accession of Hitler in 1933 to the cultural revolutions that swept across Europe in the late 1960s, music was politicised on an unprecedented scale.

The similarities and differences between Britain and Italy make them ripe for a comparative approach. In the aftermath of the First World War, both countries developed powerful Marxist and Fascist contingents, but while Britain remained democratic, Italy became home to one of the longest-running totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century. Both had prominent heritage industries, but nostalgia for a musical past had differing political resonances within and between the two countries. And although both were economically and physically damaged by the Second World War, their experiences of conflict were notably different: Italy endured occupation, Allied liberation and subsequently what amounted to civil war; Britain maintained its freedom, but, in doing so, furthered the decline of its status as an imperial and world power.

Many prominent scholars are currently addressing the fact that Britain and Italy have tended to reside at the edge of musical historiography during this period, sidelined by the centrality traditionally afforded Germany and France; this conference seeks to be part of this ongoing discussion. How did political events affect musical culture during this period? Can a comparative study of Italy and Britain reveal more about what it meant for music to be politicised during and after the Second World War?

We welcome submissions on subjects related to music and politics in Britain or Italy between 1933-1968.

Keynote Speakers:
Arman Schwartz (Columbia) and Heather Wiebe (Virginia), ‘Inside the Glass Mountain’

Roundtable, chaired by Roger Parker (King’s College London), and featuring: John Deathridge (King’s College London), Benjamin Earle (Birmingham), Marina Frolova-Walker (Cambridge), Thomas Irvine (Southampton) and Laura Tunbridge (Manchester).

For further information, and to submit a proposal, please visit:
http://www.musicandpolitics.org.uk