Music & Material Culture. From Medieval Times to the Present

MUSIC AND MATERIAL CULTURE. FROM MEDIEVAL TIMES TO THE PRESENT

One-Day Workshop
University of Cambridge, 7 December 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS

     During the last decade, many disciplines have been increasingly oriented towards the study of material culture, exploring the relations between objects and people. From different perspectives within the humanities and social sciences, this 'material turn' has emphasized both the materiality of objects, and their social life as bearers of cultural meaning.
     Music and sound studies have also seen a growing interest in objects and materiality, with approaches ranging from the relations of music and space, the technologies of sound production and consumption, and the materiality of musical notation, to the raise of 'materialism' as opposed to the 'idealism' that governed traditional musicology. However, these developments have taken place in a generally uncoordinated manner, and the purpose of this conference is to bring them together in such a way as to deepen knowledge and promote discussion of objects and materiality in music and sound studies.
     This workshop proposes to create a bridge between material culture studies and musical studies, exploring the wide range of objects that interact with musical practice and consumption, sound production, and the sense of hearing. The workshop has a wide regional and historical scope, ranging from Medieval times to the present.

Some of the topics that will be addressed in the workshop are:

–The theoretical and methodological challenges of materialism in musicology

–The social life of musical instruments: a new organology

–Scientific knowledge and ideas of the material in music and sound

–The body and the senses

–Mobility and cultural exchange

–Sonic materiality and immateriality of music

Abstracts of no more than 350 words should be sent both to af504@cam.ac.uk and vw261@cam.ac.uk by August 22, 2016. Please include title, name, institutional affiliation, email address, and a short biography (150 words). The Committee will notify applicants of the outcome by September 5, 2016. We welcome submissions for twenty minutes papers in English and in French. Due to time constraints, only a limited amount of papers will be selected. If you have any further queries, please contact the organising committee by emailing af504@cam.ac.uk or vw261@cam.ac.uk.

Organising Committee:

Amparo Fontaine (University of Cambridge)
Vera Wolkowicz (University of Cambridge)
Violeta Nigro Giunta (CRAL/EHESS)
Nicolò Palazzetti (CRAL/EHESS)

Work & Play: Economies of Music

Work & Play: Economies of Music

The Harvard Graduate Music Forum Conference    •    20–21 February 2015

Keynote:  Robin James (UNC Charlotte)

Round Table:  Verena Andermatt Conley, Robin James, Sindhumathi Revuluri, Kay Kaufman Shelemay

 

– Call for Proposals –

This interdisciplinary conference takes as its premise that music is inseparable from the economic conditions of its production and consumption. Through presentations, lecture-recitals and composers’ colloquia, we seek to explore the intersections of music and economics from a diverse array of perspectives including labor, practice, material culture, and capital.

Questions include but are not limited to:

  • How do musicians and their employers understand musical labor, and how does this impinge on issues of amateurism, professionalism, and institutionalization?
  • How have shifting economic systems — for instance, from patronage to mass consumption, or from liberalism to neoliberalism — altered the place of music in society?
  • How have issues such as postcolonialism, the North-South economic divide, and globalization, intersected with various musical practices to forge divergent models of economies of music?
  • Where does music succeed and where does it fail in transforming economic relations?
  • What are the economic consequences of the material means of musics’ dissemination, such as manuscripts, published scores, phonograph recordings, streaming and live performance?
  • How do questions of cultural and economic capital combine in appraisals and contestations of musical value?
  • How has music symbolically represented economics and status? What is music’s role in this endeavour today?

– Submissions –

We welcome submissions from current graduate students on these and related topics. We seek proposals on all repertoires, musical practices and historical periods, and representing a broad set of methodologies. Formats for presentation include:

  • 20-minute papers, audiovisual presentations, or exploratory text works, with 10 minutes for discussion
    Please submit abstracts of a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, up to 4 additional pages for figures. Please add a short statement regarding AV requirements.
  • 30-minute composer colloquia, performances, or lecture-recitals, with 15 minutes for discussion
    Please submit details of the work to be presented in a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, links to relevant sound recordings and/or scores or supplementary documentation.

Deadline for proposals: 5 December 2014

Please e-mail submissions to: harvardgmf2015@gmail.com

For more information please visit: http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gmf2015