Like, share and subscribe: Youtube, music and cyberculture before and after the new decade

Call for papers

In February 14th of 2005, Youtube was founded and grew to become the biggest online platform for video sharing. In these past 15 years, billions of audiovisual contents have been produced, shared, transformed, downloaded and consumed by billions of users worldwide, placing this website as a central hub for their daily lives while browsing the internet. While Youtube was – and still is – a recognized online space that provided new digital formats of content production and sharing, this platform also marked this past decade in the social, political and cultural spectrums of everyday life, creating new work logics and forms of labour (from DIY to self-made Youtubers), creative communities and social bubbles in this cyberspace. Alongside Youtube, the rapid and ever growing technological developments of the internet shaped how modern life is, nowadays, always connected in a global cloud. From smartphones to laptops, from televisions to refrigerators, technology plays a central role in the current paradigm of connectivity, social networks and instant feedback culture. Music, in many ways, as a social device, is inseparable of these processes, being a key element of our daily routines. Music was progressively molded and adapted to the technological and social demands of the past years, but also took part in shaping in several ways the new technology itself. This dual connection enabled the predominance of music and its sociocultural practices in several online platforms, forums and specialized websites, while at the same time, the role of the user and their input is central to the participatory culture that defines the current era. The boundaries between users and producers are increasingly blurred, if not already inexistent, and many of the contents available online are the result of the individual investment of the produsers, allowing to share their own personal interests with cybercommunities formed around specific objects.

​Considering these aspects, it’s of the utmost relevance to discuss how musical practices – composing, listening, playing, teaching – have been transformed in the past fifteen years and what is to be expected and considered to be the future of music in the next decade of 2020. How was Youtube a trigger in the consolidation of new audiovisual formats online from its start? What are the new and reinvented forms of music production and consumption in digital spaces? Are these online platforms contributing to ease our daily lives? How is the internet transforming the creative industries and the agents who play a part in them? What are the main changes in music production and consumption in the industry of entertainment and audiovisual media? And also, how is the internet relevant for musicology, both as a tool and/or an object? This conference aims to gather students, academics, artists, teachers, composers, performers and other interested parties in the discussion and research on music, internet and cyberculture, inquiring about the role of the social, cultural and technological transformations in the digital paradigm regarding the consumption, circulation, production and remediation of music. Taking into account the 15th anniversary of Youtube and the start of a new decade of the 21st century, this conference aim’s to discuss, among other topics, the following subjects:

  • The role of Youtube in the musical paradigm from 2005
  • Youtube as a tool, an object and/or a source for musicology and music education
  • The impact and role of new technologies in composing and performing music
  • New forms of music production, consumption and circulation online
  • The uses of music in digital audiovisual contents and processes (films, tv, videogames, publicity, propaganda, social networks, etc.)
  • Cybercommunities and fans, interactivity and participatory cultures
  • Internet and the DIY discourse in music
  • Impact and repercussions of digital culture in today’s way of life
  • Cultural industries and digital aesthetics

Essential informations:

​Presentation lenght: 20 min + 10 min for discussion/questions
Deadline for submission: March 8
Proposal guidelines: abstract (c. 300 words) with a biographical note (c. 150 words) in a doc. file
​Send to: youtubeconference.cysmus@fcsh.unl.pt

All the abstracts will be submited to a blind peer-review and the results and programme draft will be announced around April 15th.

A selection of papers will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Keynote speaker:
Dr. Holly Rodgers (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The conference will take place in Colégio Almada Negreiros of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities of the NOVA University of Lisbon, organized by the Research Cluster of Music and Cyberculture (CysMus) of the Centre for Study of Sociology and Aesthetics of Music (CESEM).

All the informations concerning the conference are provided and updated on the official website and on the CysMus site, and also on its facebook page and twitter.

Ignacio Jerusalem 250: Galant Musics in Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, and the New World

Location: Baeza, Spain
Dates: December 3–5, 2019

The Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, Baeza, the Centro Nacional de Difusión Musical (Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte, Gobierno de España), and the Festival de Música Antigua de Úbeda y Baeza are organizing an international conference in collaboration with the IMS Study Group “Early Music and the New World.” The conference is entitled Ignacio Jerusalem 250: Galant Musics in Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, and the New World and will take place at the Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, Baeza, Spain, from December 3 to 5, 2019.

Call for papers

Sounds of Mass Media: Music in Journalism and Propaganda

Location: Växjö, Sweden
Dates: June 7–10, 2019

The 11th annual conference of the IMS Study Group “Music and Media” (MaM) will take place at the Linnæus University Växjö (LNU), Sweden, from June 7 to 9, 2019. Potential speakers should submit their proposals before March 15, 2019.

Official website (including CFP): https://studygroupmam.com

Music in the Disruptive Era: The Digital, the Internet and Beyond

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

14-16 December 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music in the Disruptive Era: The Digital, the Internet and Beyond», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 14 to 16 December 2019.

The conference aims to investigate the role of the Web and how all the tools related to it have changed the way we learn, approach ourselves and experience music. What are the new forms of music production and consumption through the web? And how has the way we learn music changed? Are new genres and creative processes born? How has the Web influenced the music market? And what are the new types of jobs in music making? Can Music professionalism survive the digital wilderness? Finally, the conference intends to investigate the development of increasingly effective tools useful for musicological research, such as, for instance, the dissemination of historical sources and updated archives, as well as online scientific literature and databases.The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas,although other topics are also welcome: 

  • New Forms of Music Production, Consumption and Reception through the Web
  • New Genres and Creative Processes
  • Musical Discoveries and Knowledge through the Web
  • The Web and Music Education
  •  Music and Liquid Modernity 
  • Music and the Digital Divide
  • The Web and the Music Market
  • New Kinds of Jobs in Music
  • The Web and Research in Music
  • Music Criticism and the Web
  • Sources, Libraries and the Web
  • The Web and Music Publishing
  • Impacts of Digital Media on Musical Performance and Programming
  • The Web, Music Copyright and other Legal Issues
  • Visualizing Music: Defining the Online Experience

Programme Committee

  • David Hurwitz (ClassicsToday.com)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Pedro Ordoñez Eslava (University of Granada)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynotes Speakers:

  • Georgina Born (University of Oxford)
  • Christine Hine (University of Surrey)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume. 

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography. 

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 5 May 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date. 

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala 

conferences@luigiboccherini.org 

www.luigiboccherini.org

RMA Study Day: Music, Media and Technologies

Royal Musical Association Study Day
20 May 2017, Durham University, UK

Keynote speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)

View the full programme and registration form. All are welcome to attend:

For more information please contact Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk

Papers:

Daniel Gouly – The affordances of digital music tools in theory and practice

Alex Stevenson (Leeds Beckett University) – Digital aesthetics in contemporary popular music performance

Bridget Coulter (University of Sheffield) – Authenticity and auto-tune: technology and the construction of vocal ‘naturalness’ in popular music

Nigel Martin (University of Derby) – Interpreting recontextualised guitar in contemporary popular music practice

Danielle Beverly (Northwestern University in Qatar) – Analog artifacts in the Middle East: music, memory, materiality, movement

Stephen Wilford (City, University of London) – “This is just a band”: music, representation and digital technologies in the Middle East and North Africa

Safa Canalp (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) – Towards a notion of subcultural transfer: circulation of media, and hierarchies of knowledge, taste and behavior

Tat Amaro (Durham University) – Shaping the past, surviving the future: computer karaoke in contemporary piphat music-making in Phayao province, northern Thailand

Karlyn King (University of Birmingham) – Vinyl records vs digital ephemera: does the medium of music matter?

Anne-Marie Beaumont & Aglaia Foteinou (University of Wolverhampton) – Back to the future: auralization and its application in musical analysis

Elizabeth Hunt (University of Liverpool) – Video games live and the gamification of the symphony orchestra

Kate Mancey (University of Liverpool) – The hidden soundtrack: music making in Rez Infinite


[original CFP follows]

Music, Media and Technologies

RMA Study Day, Durham University, UK
Saturday 20 May 2017

Keynote Speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)
Call for Papers deadline: 3 March 2017

How do media and technology shape music-making, music experience, and music meaning? What contemporary and historical developments in these fields influence how music (of any kind) can be understood? How has music played a role in shaping wider media and technology environments?

This study day aims to attract scholars from across music’s sub-disciplines interested in analysing the significance of media and technologies in the production, dissemination and experience of music.

Research areas might include (but are not limited to) both contemporary and historical approaches to musicology, analysis, ethnomusicology, music technology, psychology, education, composition and performance. There are no restrictions on musical genres, eras, or research approaches.

Contributions from postgraduate students and Early Career Researchers are especially welcome.

The study day will be free for Royal Musical Association (RMA) and Durham University Music Department members. There will be a fee of £10 for non-members.

All papers will be of 20-minutes duration. Please send abstracts of up to 300 words.

For enquiries or to submit an abstract, please email Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk.
Deadline for receipt of abstracts: Friday 3 March 2017.

The following themes are of particular interest:

Media and technologies in music production:
– Musical instruments and creative tools
– Wider technologies around creation and live music-making
– Recording and the studio

The influences of technologies at the moments of inspiration, creation and live performance in music of any kind. These may be central to the production of sound (musical instruments, creative tools) or have a less direct impact (technologies bringing together musicians and listeners, technologies of the physical or media spaces for music-making). These themes might be approached from analytical, historical or social perspectives, as well as those of creative practice.

Media and technologies in music dissemination:
– Film, broadcast, and music industries
– New media (historical or contemporary perspectives)
– Media of music learning

The roles of media and technologies in how music is spread and encountered. Focuses may include the impacts of commercialisation and the proliferation of new media (from both historical and contemporary perspectives) upon the processes and products involved in learning and sharing music. They might be explored through analysis of both musical texts and wider social contexts.

Media and technologies in music experience:
– Technologies of listening and music’s integration into everyday life
– Issues of genre, transnationalism and cultural hybridity
– Impacts upon identities, politics and communities

The effects of media and technologies in music’s broader involvements and uses. Focus here may fall on audiences, listeners, amateurs and communal music-makers, for whom music is integrated into wider life through media and technologies. Suggested areas of exploration include impacts upon global music flows, and the shaping of communal and individual experiences with music.

Ludomusicology Conference 2014

Easter Conference (10-12 April 2014, Chichester University)

The Ludomusicology research group is excited to announce that the Ludo 2014 international conference on videogame music will take place at the University of Chichester (UK) from Thursday 10th to Saturday 12th April 2014.

Our Call for Papers can be found here, and a PDF poster for distribution can be found here.  Please help circulate and spread the word!

This is our third annual conference on video game sound and music, and will feature:

  • Keynote addresses by:
    • Kevin J. Donnelly (Southampton University), author of The Spectre of Sound: Music in Film and Television (BFI Publishing, 2005)
    • William Cheng (Harvard University), author of Sound Play: Video Games and the Musical Imagination (OUP, forthcoming)
  • Industry sessions with game audio professionals
  • More events to be confirmed

The conference themes this year are:

  • Canons and curating game music
  • Simulation, immersion and “the real” in sound and audio
  • Game audio outside games

Further details will be added on our website over the coming weeks.

You can contact us via our website at http://www.ludomusicology.org or by email at ludomusicology@gmail.com.

Organizers: Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers, Mark Sweeney.

Hosted by Stephen Baysted, Reader in Film Composition, Chichester University.