“Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture” Conference 2020

Call for Papers!

We warmly welcome you all to a new LAHP student-led activities conference: Gendered Representations in 20th Century American Art & Culture. We are excited to bring you two days of thought-provoking discussions designed to showcase new and emerging approaches to the study of gender construction and identity in American culture, addressing how femininities and masculinities are explored through the modes of music, literature, art, and wider media and cultural apparatus. The aim of this conference is to bring together PhD students and early career academics within the field of American Studies across departmental boundaries, enabling them to share their research and engage in collaborative debates surrounding the role of gender in a culturally and socio-politically tumultuous period of American culture; the twentieth century.

The conference will be held on Wednesday 10th June and Thursday 11th June 2020 in the historical and cultural epicenter of London, at King’s College London’s Strand Campus.

We specifically aim to pose the question: how can examinations of creative practices and cultural products enable a deeper understanding of regionally determined expressions of gendered identity? Whether participants challenge current discourse surrounding gender and American Studies, or discuss the ways in which we as academics shape and pursue the intersection of such disciplines, we intend to create a space wherein interdisciplinary research is produced, debated, and assessed; our call for papers encourages exchange between diverse fields of interest.

Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Articulations of gender and race, class, age, ability, sexuality, etc. in American culture, i.e. literature, music, film, audience engagement, reception, and participation
  • Exclusion and gender inequalities in American culture 
  • Collaborative practices and the creation of community
  • Cultural and social histories

How to Participate:

We are looking for 15 to 20 minute presentations, which may include formats such as films, digital artworks, lecture performances, etc.

Please submit an abstract (up to 250 words) outlining the paper’s main arguments, format, and relevance to the conference theme. Submissions should also include your institutional affiliation, paper title, 3-4 keywords, a short biography (up to 100 words), and your contact details.

Email both the proposal and biography to genderinamericaconference@kcl.ac.uk by 23.59 GMT on Wednesday, 15th April 2020.

More information is available at kclgenderinamericaconference.wordpress.com, including registration details.

Costs: Participation in and attendance to the conference is free*.
*Please note that while there are potential bursaries for travel expenses, all participants are responsible for covering the majority of costs including possible visa expenses and accommodation.

Keynote Speakers:

We are thrilled to announce our two Keynote Speakers: Dr. Rona Cran, Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre, and Assistant Professor Dr. Martin Lüthe, Assistant Professor of Culture.

Dr. Rona Cran
Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature
Co-Director of the American & Canadian Studies Centre
University of Birmingham, UK

Rona Cran is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature at the University of Birmingham, where she is also Director of the Centre for American and Canadian Studies. She is the author of Collage in Twentieth-Century American Art, Literature, and Culture (Ashgate/Routledge, 2014). Her current book project is entitled Multiple Voices: New York City Poetry, 1950-1995; she is also compiling a new anthology of New York City poetry, City of the World: Poems of New York (Fordham University Press, 2021). She has written or is writing articles on New York poetry, American women poet-editors and the mimeograph revolution, Joe Brainard and John Ashbery, Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg and collage, place, space and identity in Richard Yates, William Burroughs and eating, and William Burroughs and art.

Dr. Martin Lüthe
Assistant Professor
Department of Culture
Freie Universität Berlin (The Free University of Berlin), Germany

Martin Lüthe received his doctorate from the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture in Gießen. He is currently Einstein Junior fellow and assistant professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. Lüthe published the monographs “We Missed a Lot of Church, So the Music Is Our Confessional”: Rap and Religion (Lit Verlag, 2008) and Color-Line and Crossing-Over: Motown and Performances of Blackness in 1960s American Culture (WVT, 2011) and is working on a manuscript for Wire Writings: Media Change in the Culture of the Progressive Era.

Conference Organisers:

Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Sophia Sakellaridis Mangoura is currently a PhD candidate in the Music Department at King’s College London supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership to pursue a thesis in Opera Studies. Previously, she completed her LLB and MSc in Political Science and Sociology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. She holds a Classical Vocal Studies Diploma from the Musical Horizons Conservatory in Athens and now performs as a Soprano. Her major academic interests are centered on gender studies, specialising in operatic femininities.

Robyn Shooter
PhD Candidate, Department of Music, King’s College London
Robyn Shooter is a current PhD student enrolled in the Music department at King’s College London (KCL), undertaking a thesis examining constructions of identity and authenticity in alternative country music. She has previously completed an MMus in Musicology and Ethnomusicology (KCL), an MA in Cultural and Creative Industries (KCL), and holds a BA (Hons) in Comparative Literature (Queen Mary University of London). Robyn’s research is informed by her interdisciplinary background, with interests including popular culture in the United States, countercultural movements in twentieth-century America and Europe, regional identity and the American South, and nostalgic readings of Americana cultural heritage.

Iberian musical crossroads through the ages: Images of music-making in their transcultural exchanges

Fifteenth symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Iconography of the Performing Arts
organized by the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Institut d’Estudis Catalans

Barcelona, 17–19 October 2018

Iberian peninsula—the home of Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Basque, and Galician peoples—has been a significant economic and political region through the history, which had been both conquered by the powers coming from elsewhere and generating its own forces exploring and conquering other regions and cultures in the world. From the Bronze Age onwards, explorers and traders used the peninsula as the crossroad between the Mediterranean and much of the rest of the world. The Phoenicians came to Iberia in the ninth century BC, and the Greeks followed two centuries later. The Romans conquest of Hispania started during the second Punic War in 206 BC and by the time of Augustus near the entire peninsula was under the control of Rome. During the Middle Ages, Al-Andalus with its Islamic administration was open to an import of Arab knowledge, philosophy, culture, arts and music. Later on, Spain and Portugal were the strongest naval powers in the world and their overseas explorations have radically altered both the old and new worlds: Spain influenced South American and Caribbean cultures, and even the Philippines; the Portuguese travellers, traders and conquerors reached Brazil, sailed along the African coast, and arrived all the way to India, Malacca, and Macao. Through the crown of Aragon, Catalonia experienced cultural exchanges within the western Mediterranean Sea and southern Italy. In addition to the overseas networks, cultural and artistic exchanges were also occurring in Europe through commercial and political ties, and also through marriages between the royal houses. Throughout the history pilgrims walking the Camino de Santiago, or visiting the shrines of Montserrat or Fatima were bringing with them songs, dances and instruments from all over Europe.

All these and many other explorations and migrations created a fertile framework for a rich exchange of musical ideas, sounds, forms, rhythms, dances, and instruments. The Barcelona conference of the ICTM Study Group on the Iconography of Performing Arts will examine visual sources documenting transborder and transcultural transmission of musical ideas between the peoples of the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world. Papers are invited concerning the following topics:

  • Sounds of the ancient world: The Iberian cultures in an exchange with other Mediterranean traditions
  • Islamic sounds in Al-Andalus
  • Music and dances of Spanish Sephardim
  • Music along the road: Travelers and pilgrimages in Spain and Portugal
  • The Borgia family as a mediator of musical life between Iberia, Rome and the Vatican
  • Music and explorers (Columbus, Vasco da Gama, trade routes to Latin America, Asia, Africa)
  • Portuguese ethnohistoric accounts about music of Brazil, Macao, and Estado da Índia
  • Spanish encounters with music cultures of pre-Colombian America
  • Music in Catholic missions of New Spain and in the Christianization of Goa
  • Exchanges between Catalonia and kingdoms of Naples and Sicily
  • Reception of the Italian opera in Spain and Portugal
  • Zarzuela and other music theater in Latin America
  • Spain as a topos in music exoticism (opera, operetta, ballet, dance); Orientalism in Spanish art
  • Exchanges of musical instruments between Iberian Peninsula and the rest of the world
  • Internal musical exchanges between the peoples of the Iberian peninsula
  • Spanish/Portuguese iconographic models used in Latin American decorative programs
  • Transcultural musical topics in the 20th- and 21st-century art
  • Proposals related to other transcultural music exchanges in the world may be also considered

English is preferred language for the conference presentations.
Abstracts of 250–300 words may be submitted before 2 April 2018 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309
zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

and

Jordi Ballester
Societat Catalana de Musicologia
Institut d’Estudis Catalans
Carrer del Carme 47
08001 Barcelona
Jordi.Ballester@uab.cat

Images of Music-Making and Its Trans-Cultural Exchanges

Fourteenth symposium of the ICTM Study Group for Iconography of the Performing Arts,
organized by the Xi’an Conservatory of Music (西安音乐学院)

Xi’an, 27–31 October 2016

Besides notated compositions, preserved instruments, and writings on music, images can also furnish an abundance of information important for music history. The conference will provide scholars of music iconography with a forum to present their views on exchanges of cultural and musical influences. For the Chinese scholars, this will be an opportunity to get acquainted in more detail with the Western visual sources, as well as the research methodologies and techniques facilitated by the Western scholars which are often significantly different from the Chinese models. For the Western scholars, on the other hand, the conference will bring into focus the richness of Chinese iconographic sources, their significance in the music history of Asia, and methods of research facilitated within Chinese academia.

Proposals for Papers on the Following Topics are Invited:

  • Music culture of China and other Asian countries reflected in visual sources
  • Instruments and their symbolism represented in visual arts
  • Scenography and iconography of music theater
    (traditional Chinese/Asian theater forms, Western opera and music theater)
  • Iconography of dance
  • European visions of Chinese and other Asian musics
  • Methods of research in music iconography
  • Papers on other topics related to music iconography will be considered

English is preferred language for the conference presentations.
Abstracts of 200–300 words may be submitted before 15 March 2016 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
The City University of New York Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309
zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

and

杨婷婷 / Yang Tingting
Research Center for Northwestern Ethnic Music
Xi’an Conservatory of Music
No. 108, Chang’an Mid Road
Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710061
xbmzyyyjzx@163.com

Timing of the symposium is coordinated with the dates of the 10th symposium of the International Study Group for Music Archaeology, which will be held at the Hubei Provincial Museum in Wuhan, 21–25 October 2016.

Sounds of Wars and Victories: Images of Military Musicians on Battlefields and Promenades

The thirteenth conference of the Research Center for Music Iconography, City University of New York, The Graduate Center,

commemorating the centennial of World War I

New York, 11–13 November 2014

Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I and starting on Armistice Day 2014, the conference will focus on the iconography of military musicians of all time and performing in any occasion. Throughout history, military musicians formed a significant part of the soundscape not only on battlefields during wartime, but also in the neighbourhood of their military barracks during peacetime. Still, as historical documentation of their performances, repertoire, and personnel is most often integrated with military matters at national war archives, music historians too often leave them out of their historical narratives.

Traditions of military ensembles are as rich and varied as they could be. Different nations and military branches have developed preferences for specific repertoires and instruments. Their performances were equally integrated into military and civilian musical life, having a variety of purposes spanning from strengthening national identity and patriotism to providing music accompaniment at middle class dances and ceremonies. Therefore, the visual aspect of their performances has always been as significant as their music repertoire. Whether marching across town or attending a welcoming ceremony for a state dignitary, they were always proponents of the government and its power. With that purpose, their uniforms developed over time into specific distinctive attributes forming national symbolism, and their performances became ceremonies in their own right.

The conference aims to examine the visual aspects of military musicians throughout history, in particular the role of military bands in creating national visual identities; occasions in which military ensembles performed and their interactions with audiences; their instruments and performing formations; graphic designs of editions of compositions by military bandmasters; and representations of music on commemorative war monuments.

Abstracts of 200–300 words may be submitted before 1 May 2014 to:

Zdravko Blažeković

Research Center for Music Iconography

City University of New York, The GraduateCenter

365 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY10016-4309

zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

http://rcmi.gc.cuny.edu/wp-content/uploads/WWI.pdf

Neoclassical Reverberations of Discovering Antiquity

Twelfth conference of the ICTM Study Group for the Iconography of the Performing Arts

in collaboration with the Istituto per i beni musicali in Piemonte

will be held at the Archivio di Stato di Torino

Torino, 6–10 October 2014

With the discoveries of Herculaneum and Pompeii, the eighteenth century marked the birth of modern archaeological methods. The newly discovered Roman sites became a leading attraction for intellectuals travelling in Italy on the Grand Tour, and equally admired by royalty, young British students, or artists and musicians. On the other hand, Napoleon’s Egyptian Campaign inspired the fashion of Egyptomania, which could be in its different forms traced back to antiquity. These new opportunities for the study of Mediterranean antiquity and the general fascination with it, made the ancient artistic vocabulary fashionable throughout Europe, and it was reflected in the most diverse aspects of nineteenth-century life, ranging from the decoration of public buildings and artistic and architectural styles, to fashion, furniture, and opera libretti. The conference aims to examine the influences and reflections of this new knowledge of antiquity on visual arts as related to music.

  • Music in neoclassical visual art
  • The impact of archaeological explorations at Pompeii and  Herculaneum
  • New visions of ancient musical life and myths
  • Public buildings decorated in the ancient Roman style
  • Music of ancient Egypt and North Africa as seen by Western artists
  • Antiquity in operatic scenography
  • Musical impressions by artists on Grand Tours

Free papers will be also considered

 

Abstracts of 200–300 words may be submitted before 1 May 2014 to:

Zdravko Blažeković

Research Center for Music Iconography

City University of New York,

The GraduateCenter

365 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY10016-4309

zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

Cristina Santarelli

Istituto per i beni musicali in Piemonte

Via Anton Giulio Barrili 7

10134 Torino

cristina.santarelli@tin.it

Further information will be posted at

http://www.ictmusic.org/group/iconography-performing-arts

and

http://www.ibmp.it/entrata.htm