Like, share and subscribe: Youtube, music and cyberculture before and after the new decade

Call for papers

In February 14th of 2005, Youtube was founded and grew to become the biggest online platform for video sharing. In these past 15 years, billions of audiovisual contents have been produced, shared, transformed, downloaded and consumed by billions of users worldwide, placing this website as a central hub for their daily lives while browsing the internet. While Youtube was – and still is – a recognized online space that provided new digital formats of content production and sharing, this platform also marked this past decade in the social, political and cultural spectrums of everyday life, creating new work logics and forms of labour (from DIY to self-made Youtubers), creative communities and social bubbles in this cyberspace. Alongside Youtube, the rapid and ever growing technological developments of the internet shaped how modern life is, nowadays, always connected in a global cloud. From smartphones to laptops, from televisions to refrigerators, technology plays a central role in the current paradigm of connectivity, social networks and instant feedback culture. Music, in many ways, as a social device, is inseparable of these processes, being a key element of our daily routines. Music was progressively molded and adapted to the technological and social demands of the past years, but also took part in shaping in several ways the new technology itself. This dual connection enabled the predominance of music and its sociocultural practices in several online platforms, forums and specialized websites, while at the same time, the role of the user and their input is central to the participatory culture that defines the current era. The boundaries between users and producers are increasingly blurred, if not already inexistent, and many of the contents available online are the result of the individual investment of the produsers, allowing to share their own personal interests with cybercommunities formed around specific objects.

​Considering these aspects, it’s of the utmost relevance to discuss how musical practices – composing, listening, playing, teaching – have been transformed in the past fifteen years and what is to be expected and considered to be the future of music in the next decade of 2020. How was Youtube a trigger in the consolidation of new audiovisual formats online from its start? What are the new and reinvented forms of music production and consumption in digital spaces? Are these online platforms contributing to ease our daily lives? How is the internet transforming the creative industries and the agents who play a part in them? What are the main changes in music production and consumption in the industry of entertainment and audiovisual media? And also, how is the internet relevant for musicology, both as a tool and/or an object? This conference aims to gather students, academics, artists, teachers, composers, performers and other interested parties in the discussion and research on music, internet and cyberculture, inquiring about the role of the social, cultural and technological transformations in the digital paradigm regarding the consumption, circulation, production and remediation of music. Taking into account the 15th anniversary of Youtube and the start of a new decade of the 21st century, this conference aim’s to discuss, among other topics, the following subjects:

  • The role of Youtube in the musical paradigm from 2005
  • Youtube as a tool, an object and/or a source for musicology and music education
  • The impact and role of new technologies in composing and performing music
  • New forms of music production, consumption and circulation online
  • The uses of music in digital audiovisual contents and processes (films, tv, videogames, publicity, propaganda, social networks, etc.)
  • Cybercommunities and fans, interactivity and participatory cultures
  • Internet and the DIY discourse in music
  • Impact and repercussions of digital culture in today’s way of life
  • Cultural industries and digital aesthetics

Essential informations:

​Presentation lenght: 20 min + 10 min for discussion/questions
Deadline for submission: March 8
Proposal guidelines: abstract (c. 300 words) with a biographical note (c. 150 words) in a doc. file
​Send to: youtubeconference.cysmus@fcsh.unl.pt

All the abstracts will be submited to a blind peer-review and the results and programme draft will be announced around April 15th.

A selection of papers will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Keynote speaker:
Dr. Holly Rodgers (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The conference will take place in Colégio Almada Negreiros of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities of the NOVA University of Lisbon, organized by the Research Cluster of Music and Cyberculture (CysMus) of the Centre for Study of Sociology and Aesthetics of Music (CESEM).

All the informations concerning the conference are provided and updated on the official website and on the CysMus site, and also on its facebook page and twitter.

Società Italiana Di Musicologia. 26th Annual Conference

Matera, Conservatorio di musica “Egidio Romualdo Duni” – Università della Basilicata 18-20 October 2019

The 26th Annual Conference of the Società Italiana di Musicologia (SIdM) will take place in Matera, European Capital of Culture 2019, in collaboration with the Conservatory of Music “Egidio Romualdo Duni”and the Basilicata University from 18 to 20 October 2019. The annual member’s meeting will take place during the conference.
Scholars from all over the world are invited to submit their paper proposals. Every topic in the field of musicological studies is welcomed.
The abstract (no more than 30 lines) should indicate the title of the proposed paper, the state of the art for in the chosen research field, an outline of the project and its specific contribution to the current knowledge.
Along with the text please send also a short CV (max 15 lines) and indicate the A/V equipment required. Please provide your full name, address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address.
Scholars are not allowed to send more than one abstract.
The paper shall not exceed 20 minutes in duration (corresponding to an 8-page text containing to a maximum of 16000 characters). Preference will be given to the proposals of scholars who did not take part in the previous SIdM conference. Please send the proposals to the e-mail address segreteria@sidm.it
All proposal must be received no later than 15th June 2019. Acceptance of papers will be notified by 10th July 2019. For further information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.sidm.it.

Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research

‘BEYOND “MESEARCH”: AUTOETHNOGRAPHY, SELF-REFLEXIVITY, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AS ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN MUSIC STUDIES’

Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16-17 April 2018, Senate House, London

*NB This event has now been expanded to a two-day conference*

Registration: https://store.surrey.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/fass-faculty-of-arts-social-sciences/conferences/autoethnography-selfreflexivity-and-personal-experience-in-music-studies-1617-april-2018

Provisional Programme: https://christopherwiley.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/imr-conference-programme-provisional-16-17-04-18.pdf

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

Encounters, Discussions, Experimentations: Art, Research and Artistic Research in Music

Nordic Research Symposium, Venice 16th to 17th June 2017

Uniarts Helsinki’s Sibelius Academy is organising a Nordic research symposium in Research Pavilion in Venice, Italy on June 16th-17th 2017 together with its partners, the Arne Nordheim Centre for Artistic Research at the Norwegian Music Academy and the Academy of Music and Drama at the University of Gothenburg. The two-day event focuses on music and the multifaceted interrelationships between music and research, as well as artistic research in music.

The Research Pavilion is created and hosted by Uniarts Helsinki. It is a platform for artistic research, hosting 3 international art exhibitions & 40+ cross-artistic events in the context of the 57th Venice Biennale.

Additional information and event programme: 
researchpavilion@uniarts.fi
www.researchpavilion.com

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