Technology in Musical Performance Symposium (TiMP)

3rd of December 2019 – Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, Birmingham City University

Technology in Musical Performance (TiMP) is a forum for all who engage with electronics in live music performance. The symposium aims to stimulate discussion and collaboration between performers, composers, sound artists, practitioners, programmers, software developers and sound designers on musical performance with/mediated by technology.

Performative electronics is an area of music that is constantly evolving and developing. Among composers and practitioners, the desire to realise specific musical ideas leads to creative technological solutions. For new developments in music and live electronics to be thoroughly tested and evaluated, dialogue between creators and practitioners is vital.

The theme of the first edition of this one-day conference is Technology in Musical Performance. The focus of the theme is on the performance aspect of the relationship between the performer and the technology involved.

Original contributions are encouraged in, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Performance strategies
  • (Mis)Appropriation of technology in music
  • Relationships with technology
  • Relationships mediated by technology
  • Musical dialogue in/through technology
  • Technology, technique & meaning
  • Visibility of performance with technology
  • Interactivity: static, dynamic…
  • Motion: micro/macro gesture from performers perspective
  • Performance: problems related / solutions involving technology
  • Technology as a source of inspiration/creativity

We will accept submissions of new works in the following categories:

  • Papers (15 mins)
  • Performances (15 mins) + Papers (15 mins)
  • Works in Progress

Requirements for abstracts, technical information, and downloadable templates can be found on the TiMP website: http://timp.integra.io

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 4 OCTOBER 2019

IMPORTANT DATES

  • 4 October 2019 – Abstract Submission Deadline
  • 18 October 2019 – Notification of Acceptance
  • 3 December 2019 – TiMP Conference

The conference is free to attend and will provide refreshments and a light lunch. Presenters and attendees are responsible for their own travel costs.

More info and application instructions at http://timp.integra.io

The TiMP Symposium is organised by the TiMP study group: Edmund HuntHollie HardingJoe WrightLaura Farré Rozada and Niccolò Granieri, music practitioners of different disciplines brought together by their interest in exploring electronics as a part of musical performance.

Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research

‘BEYOND “MESEARCH”: AUTOETHNOGRAPHY, SELF-REFLEXIVITY, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AS ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN MUSIC STUDIES’

Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16-17 April 2018, Senate House, London

*NB This event has now been expanded to a two-day conference*

Registration: https://store.surrey.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/fass-faculty-of-arts-social-sciences/conferences/autoethnography-selfreflexivity-and-personal-experience-in-music-studies-1617-april-2018

Provisional Programme: https://christopherwiley.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/imr-conference-programme-provisional-16-17-04-18.pdf

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

Musica artificiosa: Music as an Art and Profession

51st International Musicological Colloquium, Brno, 10-12/10/2016

Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

 

The importance and the international reputation of the Brno colloquia, founded in 1966, was due not only to their varied themes (each year a separate musicological or interdisciplinary topic has been addressed), but also to the fact that these events provided an annual platform for musicological meetings between East and West during the Cold War. More or less regularly, Brno hosted leading representatives of the field (Kurt von Fischer, Zofia Lissa, Carl Dahlhaus, Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht, John Tyrrell, Michael Beckerman and many others), and it still welcomes their pupils as established representatives of foreign musicology. Today, more than ever, this event looks into the future, hoping to introduce lively new ideas, and to establish new professional contacts and collaboration.

 


Theme: Musica artificiosa: Music as an Art and Profession


The Latin noun “artificium”, in its numerous meanings, refers to art, craft, skill, talent and technology. Its derived adjective, “artificiosus”, accordingly bears a variety of meanings, ranging from skill, which is a condition of each craft, to the artificiality and unnaturalness inherent in rational compositional systems or technologies. This term is thus paradoxically capable of encompassing almost opposing significations in relation to music. With this in mind further possible topics suggest themselves for discussion at the colloquium:

 

  • music as a craft, music as a vocation, music as art;

  • aesthetic issues of “high” versus “low” music;

  • questions of rationality and irrationality in musical structure;

  • the relationship between music and technology;

  • music in the age of machines and information technology / post-technological music;

  • technologically generated / supported / mediated music;

  • virtuosity as a product of industrial society / virtuosity versus sport, etc.

The International Musicological Colloquium will be held 10-12/10/2016 in the building “N”, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, Janáčkovo náměstí 2a, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic.

 

Organizing Committee of the Colloquium:

doc. PhDr. Mikuláš Bek, Ph.D.,

prof. PhDr. Lubomír Spurný, Ph.D.,

PhDr. Petr Macek, Ph.D.,

doc. Mgr. Jana Horáková, Ph.D.,

doc. PhDr. Jiří Zahrádka, Ph.D.,

PhDr. Martin Flašar, Ph.D. 

 

Proposal Submissions:

20-minute papers are welcome, with further time for questions (max. 10 mins.)

Proposals in English, containing the title and abstract of the paper (maximum length 900 characters) should be submitted by email, together with a CV of the proposer (max. 900 characters), to: colloq.brno@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions: 30. 4. 2016.

Proposers will be informed of the committee’s decision after 31. 5. 2016.

Conference fee:

CZK 1000 (active participation) / 500 CZK (active student participation).

The fee is intended to cover the publication of the conference proceedings, refreshments during the event, an evening party and further overheads.

Deadline for payment: 30. 9. 2016 via bank transfer (an account number will be specified later) or payment in cash at the conference venue.

Further questions will be answered by the executive organizer of the colloquium:

PhDr. Martin Flašar, Ph.D.

Department of Musicology MU

Arna Nováka 1

602 00 Brno, CZ

E-mail: flasar@phil.muni.cz

Tel .: (+420) 549 493 790

 

 

SEMPRE Conference: Researching Music Technology in Education: Critical Insights

iMerc, Institute of Education, University of London
Dates: 3-4 April 2014
Submissions will open on 1 September 2013, on the SEMPRE website.
The hard deadline for submissions will be 31 December 2013
More information available at http://imerc.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/researching-music-technology-education.html
Conference chairs: Dr Evangelos Himonides (IoE) & Dr Andrew King, University of Hull