Church Music and Worship Conference

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Following on the from the success of the York Conference on Church Music held in February 2017, the organising committee for Church Music & Worship invite proposals for this two-day international conference to be held in the Pemberton Rooms at Durham University and Prior’s Hall at Durham Cathedral on the 27 and 28 April 2018.

Our Keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Jeremy Dibble (Professor in the Department of Music, Durham University) & The Rev’d Dr Maggi Dawn (Dean of Marquand Chapel, and Associate Professor of Theology and Literature, Yale University, USA).

Conference website

 

Call for Papers

We invite researchers and practitioners to submit proposals which engage with a range of methodologies and perspectives on church music and worship, from academic and practice-based viewpoints. Proposals are encouraged on the broad theme of church music and worship which may address, but need not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Church music and liturgy
  • Church music and the media
  • Church music compositional practice
  • Church music, gender, and sexualities
  • Historical perspectives on Church music
  • International perspectives on Church music
  • Theologies of musical worship

Please find information on the next two pages about how to submit a proposal and our supporters. Any questions at all may be directed to the chair of the conference committee, Enya Doyle, at churchmusicandworship@gmail.com

Submission Information

We particularly welcome submissions from postgraduate students.

We also welcome scholars who may want to or have to bring children with them.

Individual Papers

Proposals for papers should be sent as abstracts of not more than 350 words. Individual papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

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Panels

Proposals for organised panels of 3 speakers (1 ½ hours) and 4 speakers (2 hours) should submit a panel abstract (200 words) and individual abstracts (350 words each) in a single document together with the full names and email addresses of the participants. Questions about the organisation of panels should be directed to churchmusicandworship@gmail.com

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The following format should be used for proposals (send in a word doc or pdf):

  1. Name, affiliation (if applicable), and e-mail address;
  2. Type of presentation (paper, lecture recital, panel, or poster);
  3. Title of presentation;
  4. Abstract (350 words max);
  5. Audio-visual and other requirements (the following are available: Data projector or large plasma screen; Desktop PC; VGA, HDMI and 3.5mm audio inputs; CD player; DVD player; Visualiser; Piano)
  6. Brief Biography (150 words)

Questions, queries, and proposals should be sent to the chair of the conference committee, Enya Doyle, at churchmusicandworship@gmail.com

The deadline for proposals is 23:59 on January 15 2018

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The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era. International Conference celebrating 475 Years of the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona

immagine della Santissima Vergine Maria di Loreto della Giara in Verona, Stamperia del Seminario, Padova 1714 Domenico Zanatta Venezia 1665 Verona 5 agosto 1748

Verona, 1-3 June 2018

Call for Papers 
Deadline for proposals: 31 December 2017

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era is an international conference organized by the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona on the occasion of the 475th anniversary of its foundation (23 May 1543), in collaboration with University of Verona, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, University of St Andrews and Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona.
Natural sequel to The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, 24-27 May 2017 – vmo.unive.it/soundscape2017), this further initiative has the aim of increasing debate on the varied soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the early modern period. This territory, which stretched from Bergamo in the west to the Friulian Alps in the north-east and the river Po at the Republic’s southern extremity, formed one of the three subdivisions of the Serenissima; the others were the Dogado (Venice and surrounding area) and the Stato da mar (Venetian possessions in the eastern Adriatic and Mediterranean areas). The articulate system that regulates musical and non-musical sound in the Venetian territories prior to the fall of the Serenissima in 1797 is highly conducive to an interdisciplinary approach which draws on the new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology. Emblematic, in this sense, are the activities of the Accademia Filarmonica, which have dominated almost five centuries of local musical history.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

The conference will take place in Verona from 1-3 June 2018.

Suggested topics: 
– Sound and urban identity
– The sound of local civic ceremonial and devotional activities
– Reciprocal influence of Venetian and Terraferma soundscapes
– Musical relationships between the Terraferma cities and the courts of northern Italy and elsewhere
– Music and society (patronage; academies and other musical institutions, private and public; private uses of music)
– Educational, philosophical and social dynamics in musical practice
– The sounds of public and private festivities
– Musical theatre in the Terraferma and its social impact
– Music, urban architecture and the visual arts
– Music and economics (music printing, production and commerce of musical instruments, the economics of performance)
– Sound as material and non-material cultural heritage

One session of the conference will be entirely dedicated to research on the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona.

Peer-reviewed contributions will be published in a dedicated volume, scheduled to appear in 2019.

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The programme committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, with 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Please email abstracts (max. 250 words), together with a short biography, to: biblioteca@academiafilarmonica.191.it

Further information will be available from September 2017 on the conference website, which will continue to be updated with details of costs, events and accommodation near the conference venue.

Accepted proposals will be announced before 16 February 2018.

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Organizing Committee: 
Alessandro Arcangeli (University of Verona)
Vincenzo Borghetti (University of Verona)
David Douglas Bryant (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)
Luigi Collarile (University of Geneva)
Michele Magnabosco (Accademia Filarmonica, Verona)
Laura Moretti (University of St Andrews)
Laura Och (Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona)

For further information please contact
Michele Magnabosco: biblioteca@accademiafilarmonica.191.it

http://www.accademiafilarmonica.org/filarmonica/en/convegno-internazionale-2018/

 

RMA Music and/as Process Study Group 6th Annual Conference

Call for Papers/Lecture Performances
Conference: Music and Language Friday 29th June – Sunday 1st July, 2018
Edinburgh Napier University, School of Arts and Creative Industries, Merchiston Campus

We welcome proposals for contributions in the following formats:

  • Paper (20 minutes + 10 minutes questions)
  • Lecture Recital (30 minutes)
  • Participatory lecture/workshop (30 minutes)

The theme of the conference is Music and Language, both spoken and written.

Whilst the Music and/as Process Study Group has previously been aimed towards the field of music, the call remains open to practitioners and researchers within the spoken arts, and sound poetry and beyond who are drawn towards an association with the theme.

Particular themes covered might include:

  • Sound Poetry Linguistic processes in composition and new music performance
  • Oulipo
  • Radio art (or Hörspiel)
  • Concrete Poetry / Phonetic art / Lautpoesie
  • Spoken/Written Language in the construction of new music/performance/creative work
  • Interactive spoken word performance
  • Translation

Proposals should include all of the details of the proposed contribution:

  • the name(s) of presenter(s)
  • email address of presenter(s)
  • affiliated academic institution
  • title of paper/lecture-recital/workshop
  • 200-word abstract
  • [for participatory workshops only] description of the format of the workshop
  • A full list of any technical requirements and other resources

 

Please send your proposals by email to Alistair Zaldua: alistair.zaldua@canterbury.ac.uk
Deadline for proposals: Friday, 09 March 2018 Notification of successful presentations can be expected in late March 2018.

In your proposal please clearly indicate all of the presenters, including any performers if you do not intend to perform your own work. Unfortunately, the study group is not able to provide any financial assistance to attend the conference, or to support the creation or performance of works at the conference.

All presenters and performers will be required to register and pay the conference fee. At present we are working to keep this as low as possible, and we do not anticipate it being higher than £50, with a discount for students, unaffiliated ECRs, and RMA members.

A ‘Musical League of Nations’?: Music Institutions and the Politics of Internationalism – a Symposium

29-30 June 2018, Institute of Musical Research, Senate House, London

CFP: Proposals due by 1 Nov. 2017

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Anne Shreffler (Harvard University)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

‘What art is better adapted to form an international connecting-link, than music?—especially instrumental music, which is in a manner an international language, an expression of the most intimate, the profoundest emotions of man.’ – Guido Adler, 1925

The notion that instrumental music is either ‘universal’ or ‘international’ in any real sense has been discredited. Even as Adler’s comment draws upon an older notion of music as a ‘universal language’ and adapts it to the language of interwar political internationalism, he acknowledges the limitations of music to foster communication between nations, and writes that it should be the aim of research to discern the interaction between artistic phenomena that are ‘common property’ or the result of ‘nature’ on the one hand, and those that are the result of ‘culture’, and therefore localized, on the other.

The role of music and musicians in forging international links either between or beyond national boundaries can sometimes seem unproblematic or even emancipatory, under the assumption that music can be socially transformative. Yet just as the project of political internationalism between and after the World Wars was not without its challenges, so too did musical initiatives sometimes find themselves in positions of compromise, ethical conflict or co-option into unintended agendas.

This two-day symposium will focus on music institutions and initiatives that were explicitly shaped by the project of internationalism during the twentieth century. Organisations such as the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), the International Musicological Society (IMS), as well as a range of smaller musical meetings throughout Europe and America during the interwar and post-war periods, subscribed to a similar set of ideological precepts. These organisations and meetings did not only involve musical composition and performance, or academic discussion, but they also often included public congresses that prompted debate around issues that went far beyond the simple celebration of international cooperation, or of music as an expression of a common humanity. They grappled with the contradiction between the idea of a non-national music or music scholarship and the decidedly national inflections of musical autonomy itself, and they struggled to reconcile the fact that music’s putative detachment from the social realm was what gave it its ‘universal’ potential, yet the project of internationalism was a political one, struck through with ideas about social justice and ethical responsibility.

The symposium will explore the musical, political and aesthetic dimensions of the discourse that surrounded the establishment of these organisations and their activities throughout the politically-charged twentieth century.

We welcome proposals (250 words) for individual papers or panels. Please send proposals to Sarah Collins at musical.league.of.nations@gmail.com by 1 Nov. 2017. Acceptances to be advised by early December.

 

Conference Organisers (and programme committee):

Sarah Collins (Durham University)

Laura Tunbridge (Oxford University)

Barbara Kelly (Royal Northern College of Music)

 

Conference Supporters:

Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Additional funding from the British Academy/Leverhulme Small Grants Scheme

Researching Performance, Performing Research – Collaborations and Confrontations

October 27-29, 2017

Introduction

The purpose of this symposium is to explore the manifold contexts in which interactions between musical performers and scholars take place, and the different modalities in which such interactions may be conducted. In both the past and the present these have included productive collaborations and shared visions, but also genuine confrontations. The symposium will address not just the overlaps between the activities of performers and scholars and between the different types of knowledge that undergird both musical performance and the performative act of doing research, but also the disagreements, tensions, and failures that may arise when bringing these practices into dialogue.

The symposium will be structured around five basic themes:
Theme 1: Instruments of Performance Research
Theme 2: Sources of Performance Knowledge
Theme 3: Scholars and Performers Interacting
Theme 4: Institutional Cultures and Collaborations
Theme 5: Power, Prestige, and Embodied Knowledge

Speakers/performers
We have invited presentations from a wide range of musical scholars and performers, those with a pluralistic outlook on performance and research. Pre-formed sessions will contain both presentations and performances by the symposium delegates, with the aim of achieving a symbiosis of these two basic elements. The keynote address will be given by the composer and vocalist Jennifer Walshe, a world-renowned performer of contemporary art, in collaboration with the accordeonist Andreas Borregaard.

Location
The symposium will take place at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ (Piet Heinkade 1, 1019 BR Amsterdam), which is very close to Amsterdam Central Station

Programme
The final programme and abstracts can be found here

Registration
Please register for the symposium here

Accommodation
We have made arrangements with two hotels in Amsterdam, where you can book a room at a reduced rate. Click here for more information.

Questions can be addressed to the symposium conveners: john.koslovsky@ahk.nl; michiel.schuijer@ahk.nl

The organizing committee
Hans Fidom (VU University/Orgelpark)
John Koslovsky (Conservatorium van Amsterdam/Utrecht University)
Julia Kursell (University of Amsterdam)
Olga Panteleeva (Utrecht University)
Michiel Schuijer (Conservatorium van Amsterdam)
Floris Schuiling (Utrecht University)

Public Musicology Symposium

PUBLIC MUSICOLOGY INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM
Organized by the Society for Musicology in Ireland

VENUE DETAILS:
The Kevin Barry Recital Room
National Concert Hall, Dublin
Wednesday 26 April 2017
Time: 08.30-18.30

This international one-day symposium on Public Musicology, organized by  the Society for Musicology in Ireland, is in accordance with the aims of that society: to nurture and highlight the role of music in education and broader society on a national and international platform. The aim of this symposium is to ask how musicology relates to the ‘public voice’, the voice of culture at large. At a time when the government is calling for a new level of connectedness between higher education and wider society, academics are under increasing pressure to address this issue of civic engagement. Additionally, as many of our doctoral graduates do not follow an academic career path, there is an urgent need to offer alternative pathways to graduate students forging a career beyond the academy.

Our eleven guest speakers will explore a diverse range of themes: careers in and beyond musicology, community-based projects, curating concerts and issues of programming, musicology in journalism, musicology and civic engagement, music theory, musicological entrepreneurship, public musicology in Ireland, public musicology projects, and musicology and the media. This symposium aims to bring together the published scholar but also the journalist, the writer of programme notes, the teacher, the radio broadcaster and any others in a position to affect the wider discourse on music. The primary objective of the symposium is to raise awareness of how music scholars, educators, music journalists and industry professionals engage with the public at large.

GUEST SPEAKERS

Keynote Speaker:
Prof. Christopher H. Gibbs

Bard College | New York

Dr Lorraine Byrne Bodley MRIA | Maynooth University | President of the Society for Musicology in Ireland
Prof. Harry White MRIA | University College Dublin
Prof. Julian Horton | Durham University
Dr Anne M. Hyland | University of Manchester
Dr Stephen Graham | Goldsmiths, University of London
Dr J. Griffith Rollefson | University College Cork
Dr Aidan Thomson | Queen’s University, Belfast
Dr Alexandra Buckle | Oxford University
Dr Melanie Marshall | University College Cork
Dr Deirdre Ní Chonghaile | NUI Galway

 

General Admission: €10
Student Tickets: FREE

Tickets are €10 which includes tea and coffee and admission to all sessions, including the keynote address by Professor Christopher Gibbs, Bard College, New York. Students attend for FREE but must register and purchase a student ticket. Please note that there will be a wine reception following the symposium: 18.30-19.15, The 1st Floor Foyer, outside The Kevin Barry Recital Room.

Please fill out the registration form, which also contains the link to purchase tickets, via the National Concert Hall Box Office. The link to the National Concert Hall Box Office is provided at the bottom of the registration form. Please click on the link to book your ticket: https://goo.gl/forms/WkCbqMRS48FaAc533

Website

Facebook

Twitter

If you have any queries in relation to the event, please contact the symposium coordinator, Barbara Strahan: Barbara.M.Strahan@nuim.ie

Funded by the Irish Research Council New Foundations scheme

Symposium on Music, Education and Social Inclusion

London, 20th-21st July 2017

A symposium is to be held at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London on July 20th and 21st 2017 to launch the Music, Education and Social Inclusion Study Group under the auspices of the ICTM.

Founding members include musicians, senior scholars and academics from Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, North America and Asia, reflecting the multicultural nature of the collective.

Historically excluded groups such as women and girls, ethnic minorities, vulnerabilities including disabilities and other marginalities have been systematically un- or under-represented in education, reflecting wider socially discriminatory practices that in turn are perpetrated and transmitted within the school system, shaping society at large beyond schools and academic institutions.

The symposium will focus on exploring multifaceted educational practices in relation to a wider spectrum of broader issues and thinking, such as:
• Education and Representation
• Issues of Identity in Education
• Social inclusion and Education
• Education and International Development
• Ethnomusicology, Transmission Practices (teaching/learning) and Social Inclusion
Other topics that might sit well within the broader agenda are welcome and encouraged.

Papers should be 20 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes of discussion and Q&A. Abstracts should be from 200 to 250 words in length and written in English; other languages might be considered on a case-by-case basis and only where the level of English is not sufficient to express concepts fully.
Alternative presentations – other than individual papers – are welcome and length can be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. Submissions in other forms (such as video) should be no longer than 5 minutes.

In order to make participation inclusive, and aware that traveling might not be an option for many who are interested in participating, a limited number of remote presentations through Skype will be considered, so applicants are encouraged to apply even in case they might not be able to attend in person.

Deadline for submission of proposals is 20th March 2017; please submit abstracts to Keith Howard (kh@soas.ac.uk) or Sara Selleri (Sara_Selleri@soas.ac.uk). Participants will be notified by the end of April 2017.

‘I Am Not There’ International Conference on Bob Dylan

18-19 May 2017

Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, NOVA University of Lisbon.
Organization: CETAPS and CESEM

Call for Papers
(until 26 January 2017)

In 1999, Bob Dylan (b. 1941) was included in the ‘Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century’ as a “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize jury awarded Dylan a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, the artist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. The New York Times (13-10-2016) reported: “Mr. Dylan, 75, is the first musician to win the award, and his selection on Thursday is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901…In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honor, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels”. After the official Nobel announcement, opinions divided the public and critics. CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) and CESEM (Sociology and Musical Aesthetics Research Center), NOVA University of Lisbon, decided to analyze and celebrate the aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural significance of Bob Dylan’s musical, literary and artistic (visual) work, as well as its influence(s).
The initial expression in the conference’s title is the title of the biographical musical drama film I Am Not There (2007, directed by Todd Haynes and co-written with Oren Moverman), which intercuts the storylines of seven different Dylan-inspired characters. According to Haynes, “the minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that’s why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him – things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate” (apud D. Dalton, Who Is the Man?: In Search of the Real Bob Dylan, 2012).

We will privilege comparative and transdisciplinary approaches. Potential contributors are invited to submit a bionote and a 300 word abstract on themes related to any of the following conference tracks:

• Influences in/of Dylan’s music;
• Bob Dylan and awards;
• The ‘power’ of the Nobel prize for literature;
• The alter-egos and personas of Robert Zimmerman/Bob Dylan (Blind boy Grunt, Bob Landy, Tedham Porterhouse, etc.);
• Dylan’s music videos;
• Dylan in/as performance;
• Dylan and religion;
• Art, activism, protest, and social unrest;
• Dylan on stage – presence, performance and liveliness;
• Dylanesque spaces and places;
• Influences in/of Dylan’s visual art;
• Intertextuality in Dylan’s lyrics, music and videos (text-music relationship);
• Intermediality in musical genres and practices;
• Lyrics as/and poetry/literary narratives;
• Dylan depicted (visual biographies, photography, press and record [album] covers, official website);
• Dylan in cyberspace (myspace, facebook, youtube, etc);
• Dylan’s songs;
• Dylan as trend-setter;
• Musical style(s) in Dylan;
• Bob Dylan in the classroom;
• Adaptation of Dylan’s texts as children’s literature;
• Dylan in/and translation;
• Dylan’s fandom;
• Academia and Dylan’s fandom;
• Music as a social and political agent in Dylan’s and other composers’ production;
• Dylan, music and the moving image (cinema, documentary, television, internet);
• The roles and ideologies of musical, literary and artistic criticism: after Dylan;
• Gender and music;
• Listening to Dylan: social behaviors, musical taste, consumption patterns.

Working languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish. No translation will be provided.

Papers and panels on the above themes are invited. However, papers/panels on other subjects related to the above topics will also be considered. Participants will be held to a twenty minute presentation limit. Please submit an abstract and a bio note, by 05 January 2017, to the conference email:

bobdylanconferenceportugal@gmail.com

To ensure prompt notification, please include your e-mail address on your submission. If you are interested in chairing a session, please note this at the top of your abstract.
Registration fee: 80 euros. BA and MA students: 30 euros.

Conference website: https://internationalconferenceonbobdylanportugal2017.wordpress.com/

Coordination: Rogério Puga (CETAPS) e Paula Gomes Ribeiro (CESEM).

Embodied Monologues Symposium

Call for Papers and Performances

EMBODIED MONOLOGUES SYMPOSIUM — MARCH 31, 2017

MAYNOOTH UNIVERSITY, IRELAND

Deadline for Proposals: January 9, 2017

In recent years, the emergence of practice-based and performance-led research has generated dynamic, productive and provocative new forms of understanding in humanities scholarship. Knowledge and experience derived from embodied practices have done much to expand the epistemic fields centred on the body and its place in philosophy and aesthetics. Associated with these developments, topics such as voice, performativity and subjectivity have been transformed and have in turn reshaped contemporary political and social concerns, and questions of human rights, disabilities, inequality, gender, and racial and social segregation.

The emergence of movement philosophy and literature especially, as well as a greater emphasis on the performer’s body as predicated in contemporary theatre practices, has opened new pathways for research only recently applied to music performance. As the one and only dramatic figure in monologues and monodramas, the solo performer has unprecedented agency in the dramaturgy and enactment of the piece. Yet even in monodrama, a dramatic genre supposedly condensed into one stage figure, production and staging are still the result of multilayered processes and agencies.

Embodied Monologues seeks to generate responses and challenges to the idea of solo or ‘mono’ performance. What is the role of the intertextual, the multimedial, the intercorporeal in this mode of performance? According to Bakthin’s The Dialogic Imagination “the centripetal forces of the life of language, embodied in a unitary language, operate in the midst of heteroglossia”. In performance, monologues and monodramas demonstrate the dynamics of this notion, combining the individual and the collective, the solo and the dialogical in complex and revealing ways. The series will explore solo performance through practice and research across the humanities, investigating the multiple forces at work during the production and performative processes. Embodied Monologues aims to promote an interdisciplinary exchange among performers, researchers, and practitioners whose work is based primarily—however not exclusively—on solo performance.

Proposals are invited for individual papers, lecture recitals, research reports, posters, video-installations and specific sessions in any area of solo embodied or practice-led research. Deadline for abstract (maximum 300 words) and short bio (maximum 100 word) is January 9, 2017. Proposals should be uploaded at http://www.embodiedmonologues.com/

KEYNOTE EVENTS:

Catherine Laws, Senior Lecturer Department of Music University of York, Senior Research Fellow at the Orpheus Institute, Ghent (BE);

Róisín O’Gorman, Lecturer in Drama & Theatre Studies, University College Cork.

SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZER:

Francesca Placanica, Maynooth University Francesca.Placanica@nuim.ie

 

COMMITTEE:

Christopher Morris, Professor of Music, Maynooth University;

Francesca Placanica, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Maynooth University;

Benjamin Spatz, Senior Lecturer in Drama Theatre and Performance, University of Huddersfield.

 

York Conference on Church Music

Monday 13 – Wednesday 15 February 2017

The planning committee of the York Conference on Church Music would like to invite you to join us on 13th-15th February 2017 in York, UK. This joint venture between the University of York and York Minster seeks to promote and heighten awareness of the academic study, composition, and practical output of church music.

Keynote speakers include Professor Bennett Zon (Durham University), Fr Peter Allan (Principal, Community of the Resurrection), Professor Jonathan Wainwright (University of York), Dr Phillip Cooke (Aberdeen University) and Dr Thomas Hyde (Oxford University), with topics including ‘The theology of Church Music’, ‘Church Music Models for the future’, ‘Girl Choristers’, ‘The Evensong Tradition’, ‘Composition for the Church’ and ‘Worldwide experiences of Church Music’. There will be the opportunity to attend Evensong at York Minster on Monday and Tuesday and to see at close hand the workings of a modern, vibrant choral foundation.

Tickets are available via our Eventbrite site at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/york-conference-on-church-music-2017-tickets-23822798632

For further information on the conference, please visit our website at http://yccm2017.webs.com/ or contact us by email at churchmusic2017@york.ac.uk

York Conference on Church Music is a joint partnership between the University of York Music Department and York Minster.