Music – Musicology – Interpretation

XV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSICOLOGY,
UNIVERSITY OF ARTS IN BELGRADE, FACULTY OF MUSIC

Belgrade, 21 to 23 October 2021

The Department of Musicology of the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, has decided to postpone the Conference due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Conference will take place in Belgrade from 21 to 23 October 2021. The organizers of this conference will make contingency plans for an online event, in case an in-person gathering is not possible, because of the continuing uncertainties arising from the COVID-19 pandemic.

A second call for paper is open now, until 15 March 2021; decisions and notifications are re-scheduled for 1 May 2021. Those papers that have already been accepted will be programmed as a matter of course. Details are available on the website. Further information about the conference will also follow in due time.

CONFERENCE CALL

The Department of Musicology of the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, is pleased to announce its Fifteenth International Conference on the topic Music–Musicology–Interpretation.

The subject of the conference Music-Musicology-Interpretation focuses on the complex and multifaceted relationships between the constituent concepts. It proposes to re-examine these multiple relations by thematizing, from the point of view of interpretation, music as language, discourse, work of art and text, the performance of music and the discourse on music – musicology itself.

Musical hermeneutics as a discipline is today the focus of musicological interest. During the last three decades of the 20th century, it developed in parallel with research into musical semiotics and, as the influence of “pure” structural analysis was waning, it became an important current of thought about music at the beginning of the 21st century. Its renewal in relation to the legacy of the 19th century was partly due to interpretive criticism in Anglo-Saxon literature but also to the works of Carl Dahlhaus in the 1970s and 1980s. Next come researchers into hermeneutics and interpretive criticism and analysis, each with a different orientation in their individual pathways and objects of study, most of whom are still active today: Joseph Kerman, Nicholas Cook, Leo Treitler, Lawrence Kramer, Robert Hatten, Eero Tarasti, Jean-Jacques Nattiez, Michel Imberty, Bernard Vecchione, Christian Hauer, Makis Solomos…

In his Peri Hermeneias, Aristotle established an equality between “sounds emitted by the voice” and symbolic language, that is, meaningful language: “The sounds emitted by the voice are the symbols of the states of the soul, and the written words the symbols of words emitted by the voice” (Peri Hermeneias, 1 / 16a /). Being symbolic, signifying language is thus equated with interpretive language, mediating the relation of the transmitter “of the voice” to the things of the world, with the written language then constituted as a double mediation: of the spoken language and the things themselves. This chain of consecutive “interpretations-appropriations” (Ricœur, From Text to Action, 1986) thus recalls a chain of musical interpretations: the things of the world (the world of life, being-in-the-world– the music (discourse, work of art, text) – the performance of music – the discourse on music, projecting, through the hermeneutical arc, into a new being-in-the-world, as an understanding of oneself in front of signs (Ricœur, ibid).

This chain allows us to problematize the relationship between music, discourse on music and interpretation on several levels.

At the methodological level, it enables us to re-examine the position of musicological interpretive criticism in relation to primary research, technical analysis and structural explanation, on the one hand, and the “new musicology”, on the other, and, at the disciplinary level, to re-examine the position of and relationship between musical hermeneutics and structuralism, as well as semiotics. In both cases, the question can be raised as to whether the structural explanation of the musical work or the explanation of the signs of culture, on the one hand, and interpretation, on the other, are mutually exclusive, or whether a methodological reconciliation is possible in the sense of the mediating role of explanation in the process of understanding, explanation and understanding being integrated into the interpretive chain.

At the poetic level, it allows us to reopen the question of the interpretive character of the musical work/discourse/text itself as the “voice emitted”, thus already the symbolic voice, and then to re-problematize the relationship between musical language and meaning, reference, representation, narrativity and time. In this sense, another question can be posed, namely how the specific abilities of music can help shed light on the interpretive process and the contemporary hermeneutical task in general. Also related to this is the problematics of the historicity of musical hermeneutics / musical interpretation, as well as the problematics of the interpretive discourse on music in history and as history. The issue of the subjectivity and objectivity of the discourse on music and music itself is part of the old debate but it lends itself to reconsideration in relation to music as a “thing” (L. Kramer) and the work of interpretation as event, action, dynamism, creation, production. The notion of metaphor, extracted as a key concept in different conceptualizations by many authors, musicologists and philosophers, is also proposed for examination: as a musical metaphor (at the poetic level) and as a metaphor in the discourse on music.

As a link in the interpretive process, the performance of a musical score as “appropriation” and actualization of a musical text, as a realization of its meaning in another “voice”, offers itself to examination, testifying to the opening of the musical work, discourse and text. In that sense, when it comes to interpreting music from the aspect of performing practice, it is understood as something much more than a mere reproduction of the score in sound. The variable roles of the music performer throughout history represent different social, cultural, stylistic, etc. conditions under which music is understood. In all these different approaches to a work of music, it is implicitly indicated that all of its incidences and meaningful transformations are only achieved by the performance.

The position of the listener in the interpretive process can be approached from several angles: semantic, psychological, narrative. Does the interpretive process not in fact end in the effectuation of the sense in the discourse (tacit or explicit, oral or written) of the listener who has passed through the musical interpretive chain?

Referring to the aforementioned findings, the following topics could be considered:

  • Interpretive criticism in musicology versus primary research and the “new musicology”
  • Musical hermeneutics versus semiotics and structural analysis of music
  • Musical hermeneutics / interpretation in history and as history
  • Musical work / discourse / text as interpretation
  • Musical language and meaning, reference, representation, narrativity and time
  • Musical metaphor and metaphor in the discourse on music
  • Subjectivity and objectivity in musical interpretation
  • Music and / as performance
  • Musical performance and / as analysis of music
  • Historically informed performance as a field of recreation of the past
  • The listener as interpreter

Please submit your paper topic (including the thematic area as listed above) to Ivana Petković Lozo at e-mail address: muzikologija@fmu.bg.ac.rs

The submission deadline is March 15th, 2021.

Please include your short biography and an abstract of 250 words. You will be notified by 1 May, 2021 if your topic has been accepted.

The official language of the conference is English. It is possible to deliver papers also in German, French, Russian, and Serbian, but the authors are kindly requested to provide a Power-Point presentation in English or the translation of their papers in English. The time limit for the presentation and discussion of your paper is set at 30 minutes in total. Selected papers presented at the conference will be published in the proceedings.

Conference fee: Both participation at the Conference and the publication of a text whose topic has been accepted by the Programme Committee are conditional upon the payment of the participation fee. The travel expenses, per diem expenses and hotel accommodation are to be covered by the participants. The fee can be paid on the spot or with PayPal (120€; early bird, deadline June 15th, 2020: 100€; PhD candidates: 50€). Participants will be notified about PayPal payments instructions.

More about conference, themes and participation you may find at conference web site https://musicmusicologyinterpretation2020.wordpress.com/

Keynote Speakers:

Danielle Cohen-Levinas
Professor of Musicology and Philosophy
Université Paris 4 / ENS-CNRS, France

Robert S. Hatten
Marlene & Morton Meyerson Professor in Music
Professor of Music Theory
Sarah and Ernest Butler School of Music
The University of Texas at Austin, USA (TBC)

Lawrence Kramer
Distinguished Professor of English and Music
Fordham University, USA

Makis Solomos
Professor of Musicology
Université Paris 8, France

Eero Tarasti
Professor emeritus of Musicology
The University of Helsinki, Finland

Programme Committee:

Professor Antonio Baldassarre, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Suisse
Professor Danielle Cohen-Levinas, Université Paris 4 / ENS-CNRS, France
Associate Professor Paulo Ferreira de Castro, CESEM – Nova FCSH, Portugal
Professor Robert S. Hatten, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Distinguished Professor Lawrence Kramer, Fordham University, USA
Associate Professor Marija Masnikosa, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Ivana Perković, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Tijana Popović Mladjenović, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Makis Solomos, Université Paris 8, France
Professor Irina Susidko, Gnesins Russian Academy of Music in Moscow, Russia
Professor Leon Stefanija, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Professor Ana Stefanović, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor Dragana Stojanović-Novičić, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
Professor emeritus Eero Tarasti, University of Helsinki, Finland
Academician, Professor emeritus Stanislav Tuksar, HAZU/University of Zagreb, Croatia
Professor Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia

Organizing Committee:

Stefan Cvetković, PhD candidate, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Marina Marković, PhD candidate, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Ivana Miladinović-Prica, PhD, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Radoš Mitrović, PhD, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Ivana Petković Lozo, PhD, Teaching Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Neda Nestorović, PhD candidate, Research Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Milica Petrović, PhD candidate, Junior Researcher, University of Arts in Belgrade
Marija Simonović, PhD candidate, Research Assistant, University of Arts in Belgrade
Maša Spaić, PhD student, Junior Researcher, University of Arts in Belgrade
Marija Tomić, PhD student, Junior Researcher, University of Arts in Belgrade

Congress on Sound, Music and Musical Instruments

DATE: 2-3-4 of October 2020
INFORMATION: https://congressorganimusic.wixsite.com/co2020oc

THEME: The general theme chosen for this year is: “SOUND GENERATION: environment and music in generations of sound creation”, with all papers related to organological and sound matters being highly welcome. 
WHERE: Castelo Branco – central Portugal
LIMIT DATE FOR PROPOSALS: 15 September

Dear all,
we are pleased to be able to organise the ANIMUSIC Congress in 2020, in spite of the known issues we all have been facing during this year.
In the region chosen to hold our congress, there has hardly been any case of covid-19. Besides many good reasons, of which having a low population density is one of them, the air is not polluted, there is no traffic nor confusion on the streets, life quality is known to be very high. There are mountains, forests, ecological farms, self-sustainable agricultural systems (like ours in the headquarters of ANIMUSIC: Quinta da Lira), pure crystalline water fountains and rivers, with beautiful river-pools or beaches and lakes where we all go swim (water we can drink !). Besides these natural healthy conditions, in Portugal people respect the general governmental health policies, wearing masks in public closed places, keeping distance, different “in” and “out” paths, and limiting the number of people in social gatherings. Here, in Castelo Branco, the hospital created a detached alley for treating contaminated patients, fearing a full epidemic everywhere, which did not happen – in fact, the very few isolated cases  from visitors to the region were immediately taken care of, and either submitted to home-isolation or transported to specialised institutions. Cases of death “with” virus (not “from” the virus) were minimal: the serious problematic cases were from other diseases.
We are sorry to have heard of worrying publicity regarding Portugal – which led to the creation of travel limitations or quarantine obligations which were not realistic. These last bans, and the earlier general European cancellation of public events, provoked serious limitations to the organization of concerts, conferences or other initiatives, and we all know the damage it caused to the artistic world (and many other worlds), and consequently to musical instruments technicians and all related professionals. We try to go forward with positivism.
We are preparing our event with all precautions: part of the presentations or concerts will be in a large hall, with people respecting the imposed law regulations (sitting distance, masks, provision of disinfectant liquids, special hygienisation of the spaces, etc.), and part of the presentations, weather allowing, will be in open gardens.
We have sent to private contacts a first Call for Papers, to have an idea of the response of potential participants. We are happy to have had a number of proposals which allow us to set up the conference with a good core of participants.
We have thus decided to make a full public Call for Papers, waiting for a while before doing it, having been observing the evolution of the ‘epidemic’ and the various governmental decisions, and so proposing the deadline to the 15th of September. If you are interested in physically participating, please send your proposal asap, so we have a full notion of the program possibilities (we try to have various recitals, in different spaces, to allow visitors to enjoy the different marvels of each place – palaces, parks, castles, etc.). We are also planning a complimentary tour in the region, with a visit to a special historical organ in a village with difficult access. And, as usual, a wonderful delicious banquet.
Please read more about the Call for Papers, transportation, and other information, at the website created for this Congress: link.


Welcome to ANIMUSIC-Portugal.
With warm good wishes,

Patricia Bastos

ANIMUSIC team


Society for Christian Scholarship in Music Annual Meeting

Call for Papers

Annual Meeting of the Society for Christian Scholarship in Music

Deadline for proposals, October 1, 2020

Conference dates: February 25-27, 2021

Conference web site: https://www.scsmusic.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/SCSM-Call-for-Papers-2021.pdf

Conference venue: Mercer University, Macon Georgia

Individual papers, research posters, panels, and lecture recitals on any topic related to the study of music and Christianity are welcome. We invite submissions representing a variety of approaches and perspectives, including ethnomusicology, historical musicology, theory and analysis, philosophy, theology, liturgy, congregational music, and critical theory.

SCSM encourages submissions from current graduate students. A $250 prize will be awarded for the best paper presented by a graduate student at the 2021 meeting.

Please visit the conference website for proposal details. Please send submissions or questions to Richard Strauch, program committee chair, at scsm2021@gmail.com.

Note: We are currently planning on an in-person meeting, but will consider hybrid and/or online formats if circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic require it.

Like, share and subscribe: Youtube, music and cyberculture before and after the new decade

Call for papers

In February 14th of 2005, Youtube was founded and grew to become the biggest online platform for video sharing. In these past 15 years, billions of audiovisual contents have been produced, shared, transformed, downloaded and consumed by billions of users worldwide, placing this website as a central hub for their daily lives while browsing the internet. While Youtube was – and still is – a recognized online space that provided new digital formats of content production and sharing, this platform also marked this past decade in the social, political and cultural spectrums of everyday life, creating new work logics and forms of labour (from DIY to self-made Youtubers), creative communities and social bubbles in this cyberspace. Alongside Youtube, the rapid and ever growing technological developments of the internet shaped how modern life is, nowadays, always connected in a global cloud. From smartphones to laptops, from televisions to refrigerators, technology plays a central role in the current paradigm of connectivity, social networks and instant feedback culture. Music, in many ways, as a social device, is inseparable of these processes, being a key element of our daily routines. Music was progressively molded and adapted to the technological and social demands of the past years, but also took part in shaping in several ways the new technology itself. This dual connection enabled the predominance of music and its sociocultural practices in several online platforms, forums and specialized websites, while at the same time, the role of the user and their input is central to the participatory culture that defines the current era. The boundaries between users and producers are increasingly blurred, if not already inexistent, and many of the contents available online are the result of the individual investment of the produsers, allowing to share their own personal interests with cybercommunities formed around specific objects.

​Considering these aspects, it’s of the utmost relevance to discuss how musical practices – composing, listening, playing, teaching – have been transformed in the past fifteen years and what is to be expected and considered to be the future of music in the next decade of 2020. How was Youtube a trigger in the consolidation of new audiovisual formats online from its start? What are the new and reinvented forms of music production and consumption in digital spaces? Are these online platforms contributing to ease our daily lives? How is the internet transforming the creative industries and the agents who play a part in them? What are the main changes in music production and consumption in the industry of entertainment and audiovisual media? And also, how is the internet relevant for musicology, both as a tool and/or an object? This conference aims to gather students, academics, artists, teachers, composers, performers and other interested parties in the discussion and research on music, internet and cyberculture, inquiring about the role of the social, cultural and technological transformations in the digital paradigm regarding the consumption, circulation, production and remediation of music. Taking into account the 15th anniversary of Youtube and the start of a new decade of the 21st century, this conference aim’s to discuss, among other topics, the following subjects:

  • The role of Youtube in the musical paradigm from 2005
  • Youtube as a tool, an object and/or a source for musicology and music education
  • The impact and role of new technologies in composing and performing music
  • New forms of music production, consumption and circulation online
  • The uses of music in digital audiovisual contents and processes (films, tv, videogames, publicity, propaganda, social networks, etc.)
  • Cybercommunities and fans, interactivity and participatory cultures
  • Internet and the DIY discourse in music
  • Impact and repercussions of digital culture in today’s way of life
  • Cultural industries and digital aesthetics

Essential informations:

​Presentation lenght: 20 min + 10 min for discussion/questions
Deadline for submission: March 8
Proposal guidelines: abstract (c. 300 words) with a biographical note (c. 150 words) in a doc. file
​Send to: youtubeconference.cysmus@fcsh.unl.pt

All the abstracts will be submited to a blind peer-review and the results and programme draft will be announced around April 15th.

A selection of papers will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Keynote speaker:
Dr. Holly Rodgers (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The conference will take place in Colégio Almada Negreiros of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities of the NOVA University of Lisbon, organized by the Research Cluster of Music and Cyberculture (CysMus) of the Centre for Study of Sociology and Aesthetics of Music (CESEM).

All the informations concerning the conference are provided and updated on the official website and on the CysMus site, and also on its facebook page and twitter.

Music and Sonic Art: Sounding Identities

MuSA 2020 – St John’s College, University of Cambridge, UK
8 July – 10 July 2020


FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS:
We are delighted to announce the eleventh international conference on Music and Sonic Art: Sounding Identities (MuSA 2020), an interdisciplinary event to be held in St John’s College, University of Cambridge.
Keynote speaker: Prof Georgina Born, University of Oxford
Conference dates: Wednesday, 8 July – Friday, 10 July 2020.
Deadline for abstract submission: Friday, 10 April 2020.
The principal aim of MuSA 2020 is to advance interdisciplinary investigations in and between Music and Sonic Art, by exploring and building on the historical, theoretical and practical connections and continuities between these two areas. Proposals for individual papers are invited from academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students. All proposals will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed. The conference language will be English.

THEME AND TOPICS:
The theme of MuSA 2020 is Sounding Identities. The last couple of decades witnessed a remarkable burgeoning of research on how musical experiences and practices construct social, cultural, national, political, and artistic identities. During the same period, the boundaries between the traditionally distinct ways of engaging with music – i.e. as composer, performer, listener, producer, improvisor, music scholar and researcher – have begun to be questioned and challenged as new roles, practices and modes of interaction with music continue to emerge. The broad aim of this conference is to expand the remit of research on identity to all hearing, listening and art-making practices that use sound. We, therefore, invite submissions on the following, and other related topics:
• the artistic, cultural, social, institutional, national, disciplinary, political embodied and sensory (aural, visual, tactile) identities and agencies that are constructed through engagement with music and sonic art practices;
• how technologies mediate the construction of such identities;
• the material cultures that facilitate sounding identity formation;
• the emergence of new sounding identities through the cross-fertilization between musical and sonic art practices;
• fluidity and dynamics of identities across sounding cultural practices;
• sounding identities that challenge the mind/body and theory/practice dichotomies;
• sounding identities as sources of value;
• narratives and discourses of sounding identities;

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION:
Please submit an abstract of approximately 250 words in Word format to j.dack@mdx.ac.uk as an e-mail attachment.

As contributions will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed, please do not include information that might facilitate identification from the abstract. In addition, please submit separately the name(s) of the author(s), institutional affiliation (if any) and short biography (approximately 100 words).
Deadline for the receipt of abstracts is Friday, 10 April 2020. Notification of acceptance will be sent by Monday, 27 April 2020.

If additional information is required please contact Dr. Mine Doğantan-Dack or any member of the Conference Committee:
Dr Mine Doğantan-Dack (University of Cambridge, UK)
md787@cam.ac.uk
Dr John Dack (Middlesex University, UK)
j.dack@mdx.ac.uk
Dr Sean Williams (Open University, UK)
sean.williams@open.ac.uk
Dr Andrew King (University of Hull, UK)
a.king@hull.ac.uk
Prof Miroslav Spasov (Keele University, UK)
m.spasov@keele.ac.uk
Dr Christoph Seibert (University of Music Karlsruhe, Germany)
seibert@hfm-karlsruhe.de

Sound (of) Space Symposium

Please join us at the Sound (of) Space Symposium at UCL Here East, London on 11th December 2019

The Sound (of) Space Symposium will present a range of discussions around the challenges, creative opportunities and technical considerations when working with extreme and highly particular spatial conditions, across the related disciplines of architecture, engineering, music composition and performance.

The symposium will take place at UCL Here East on the 11th December 2019 and will include talks, presentations, performances and demonstrations from a wide range of academics and industry professionals including Prof. Trevor Cox (Uni.Salford), Adam Foxwell (Arup), Emma-Kate Matthews (UCL) and Freya Waley-Cohen (Royal Academy of Music), plus many more…

Please visit www.soundspacegroup.com to book your free ticket.

International Conference Rethinking The Three Cornered- Hat a century after

International Conference
Rethinking The Three-Cornered Hat After a century after


Where

Palacio de la Madraza, University of Granada, Spain.

When

3rd – 5th July 2019


Organisation

Fundación Archivo Manuel de Falla/Universidad de Granada/Universidad
Complutense de Madrid/Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

Collaboration

Festival Internacional de Música y Danza de Granada/Acción Cultural
Española/Ayuntamiento de Granada/Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte-INAEM

Registration and further details

Please, visit our website:

https://sombrero3picos.wixsite.com/congresosombrero

Conference outline


On 22nd July 1919, in the Alhambra Theatre in London, the Diaghilev Ballets Russes premiered
one of the most relevant works in the history of Western dance and music, the international
projection of Spanish culture and the configuration of the Spanishness imaginary. This ballet
was based on the adaptation of Pedro Antonio de Alarcón’s book by María Lejárraga, and had
a score by Manuel de Falla, set and costume designs by Pablo Picasso and a choreography by
Léonide Massine. Since that moment, the ballet has been performed a huge number of times
around the world, with versions by the most significant choreographers, and still lives in the
repertoire of some current dance companies.
Moreover, The Three-Cornered Hat has focused the attention of many critics and scholars, who
have built a large historiography throughout the years, both in Spain and abroad, which might

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

National Theater of São Carlos

(Lisbon Opera House)

Lisbon, Portugal

24—25 June, 2019

Keynote Speakers:

David J. Levin (University of Chicago / Department Cinema and Media Studies)

Martha Feldman [to be confirmed] (University of Chicago / Department of Music)

Paulo Ferreira de Castro (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Program Committee:

Jelena Novak (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

João Pedro Cachopo (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Mário Vieira de Carvalho (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

*

Since its inception in Italy around 1600, opera has maintained an intimate relationship with urban space and the public sphere. Most opera houses were erected in city centers and came to be seen both as secular temples and sites of entertainment in which the appreciation of high art coexisted with popular conviviality and the representation of social, political, and economic power. Just as the development of the operatic genre is inextricably linked to the rise of modern cities, it is also certain that much has changed since the inauguration of the first public opera house, the Teatro San Cassiano, in Venice, in 1637.

During the course of the twentieth-century, the emergence and advancement of new technologies of sound and image reproduction have been decisive factors in these transformations. It became possible to listen to and watch opera without attending a live performance. Further, after the introduction of synchronized sound in cinema, nothing prevented opera from being performed and recorded in places other than opera houses. Later, thanks to TV, live audio-visual broadcasts of opera became a reality, one which new digital technologies have enhanced ever since.

This conference seeks to assess technology’s impact on opera against the backdrop of its relationship to urbanity. The following question, in which issues of displacement and dissemination are weaved together, will stand at the centre of our discussions: how and to what extent did the development of audio-visual technologies allow for the visibility and audibility of opera beyond the theatre while at the same time encouraging its migration to other spaces? Many disparate practices invite this interrogation: from the live simulcasts that beam productions from opera houses to movie theatres, to the creation of new operas in town squares, train stations, old factories, swimming pools, and public transportation, not to mention community-oriented projects such as The Bicycle Opera Project or Operndorf Afrika, and open-air festivals, including the Arena di Verona Festival and the “Festival ao Largo” promoted by the National Theater of São Carlos (Lisbon Opera House).

Despite its widely reputed decline, opera is presently enjoying a moment of surprising vitality. This is true in the fields of reception and production alike, as new forms of staging and creating opera are being experimented with every year. By addressing the link between opera, technology, and the city, this conference will also attempt to draw attention to this very vitality. We hope to stimulate as broad an exchange and as open an inquiry as possible, encompassing issues of dramaturgy, criticism, spectatorship, remediation, technology, and composition, among others.

*

We welcome proposals from both scholars and practitioners across disciplines for 20-minute long papers exploring any of the above-mentioned topics. Please submit your abstract (of up to 250 words) to propera2020@gmail.com no later than April 15, 2019. The program will be announced in early May. This international conference is organized within the scope of the project “PROPERA – The Profanation of Opera: Music and Drama on Film” (funded through the European Commission under a Marie Skłodowska Curie Action) and is co-sponsored by the Centro de Estudos de Sociologia e Estética Musical (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas / Universidade Nova de Lisboa). More information here.

RASMB-IMS 2019 Conference: MUSICAL AND CULTURAL OSMOSES IN THE BALKANS

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019

Call for Papers

The National University of Music in Bucharest in collaboration with the IMS Regional Association for the Study of Music of the Balkans announce an International Musicological Conference on the subject Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans. The conference will take place at the National University of Music Bucharest, on 2–6 September, 2019.

The purpose of the International Musicological Conference is to promote interaction, research, discussion and intercultural dialogue among musicologists, ethnomusicologists, researchers and students from Romania, the Balkans and other countries with an interest on the different local musical traditions in South-East Europe and their interactions to the Mediterranean and broader region.

The conference strongly encourages debating subjects such as art music in the Balkans and its interactions with Western Europe traditions, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine chant, methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Ethnomusicology/Music Anthropology of the Balkans, current issues and approaches in Music Education in the Balkans, music and political regimes.

Proposal may address (but are not limited to) the following categories that fall under the topic of the conference:

  1. Art Music in the Balkans
  2. Byzantine and post-Byzantine chant
  3. Musical encounters: Silk roads across Mediterranean area to Asia
  4. Ethnomusicology – Anthropology
  5. Methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Music Theory
  6. Music and politics

The official conference language is English. However, participants can present in Romanian, having submitted prior to the conference and at a set deadline a translation of the final paper in English.

Proposals are invited for:

  • 20-minute papers
  • Panels of up to four presentations (90 minutes).

Abstracts of 20-minute papers should not exceed 300 words and panels’ proposals should contain the description of the panel’s subject (no more than 100 words) and an abstract (no more than 300 words) for each paper included in the panel.

All proposals should be sent electronically as an attachment to the following email address: IMS2019bucharest@unmb.ro with the subject line: Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans.

The attachment should include the following information as well:

  • Name(s) of the author(s) and institution affiliation (if applicable)
  • Type of proposal
  • Title of the paper/panel proposal
  • Short biographical note of the author(s) (100 words)

Full audiovisual equipment and adequate technical support is available for all presentations.

Important dates:

  • Abstracts of proposals/panels: no later than 22 February 2019
  • Notification of approval: no later than 22 March 2019
  • Submission of finalised papers (only in cases of translated papers from Romanian to English): no later than 1 August 2019

Registration fees:

Participants: 30 Euros (10 Euros for students, including PhD candidates)

Date and venue:

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019, National University of Music Bucharest, 33 Știrbei Vodă Str., Sector 1, 010102 Bucharest, Romania (http://www.unmb.ro).

Contact information:

Further instructions and details will soon be posted on the conference webpage: ims2019bucharest.ro.
See also: http://www.musicology.org/networks/ra/rasmb
Announcements will also appear on the webpage of the National University of Music Bucharest (http://www.unmb.ro) and the New Europe College (http://www.nec.ro).

Symposium and Workshop: South African Opera Productions after the Apartheid

Venue: Universität Bayreuth

Date:   18th– 19th October 2018

Call for Papers:

Deadline: 15th August 2018

With the end of the Apartheid era, opera – stigmatized as ‘eurocentric opera’ – became a symbol of Western dominance/colonial imposition and seemed to be dead in South Africa.

But in fact, especially the so called ‘indigenous opera’ ‘flourishes’ as something of an anachronism and can be assessed as ‘black empowerment’ (Naomi André 2018).

The writing of a historiography of opera productions in South Africa although has academically just shortly started (Donato Somma 2016; Hilde Roos 2013, 2010; Martina Viljoen 2006) and is confronted with problems of different natures: political structures, post-colonization, globalization, unstable artistic standards and institutional relations.

The ‘bloom’ of opera presents itself neither through regular performances nor through crowded theatre halls. This is a consequence of the difficult political relations of artistic production in South Africa, which are among others characterized by a lack of funding and the re-organization of the Performing Arts Councils/ National Arts Councils. The existing significant multiple theatricalities of South Africa are thereby not having a platform to present themselves. The market pressure results often in overseas productions financing the few performances in the country itself. Thereby putting itself on risk to confirm with their opera productions transferred expectations of a South African identity rather than expressing an ‘authentic’ one.

This symposium will focus on South African Opera productions. Thereby the aim of the symposium is to represent the plurality of artistic concepts that deal in different ways with the multiple challenges of political and social transformation. How can opera in South Africa be involved in the process of societal transformation in a post-apartheid society? Which new artistic concepts are needed? How does themes for the libretti change? How did language, the style of composition and orchestration transform? Which new locations for performances are found to involve new audiences? How did the aesthetics change? And how are new media used either for a new aesthetic of performances, as with e.g. ‘Lamento’ (Umculo) or ‘U-Carmen eKhayelitsha’ (Isango Ensemble), or for marketing purposes?

For the first day of the symposium presentations shall focus on one opera productions. To ‘map’ the plurality of the field presentations are invited that cover one of the following topics.

  1. South African opera productions
  • Operas of different opera companies and composers
  • Different locations of opera performances (opera house, township, film)
  • Aesthetics of the opera opus itself
  • Analysis of compositions, libretti & performances

With Prof. Dr. Naomi André (University Michigan, USA), Dr. Donato Somma (University of Witwatersrand, SA) and Dr. Lena van der Hoven (among others) some experts in the field are invited. They will present on ‘Winnie – The Opera’ (Bongani Ndodana-Breen), ‘Princess Magogo’ (Opera Africa, Mzilikazi Khumalo), ‘Heart of Redness’ (Cape Town Opera, Neo Muyanga) and ‘Romeo’s Passion’ (Umculo, Cathy Milliken).

The workshop on the second day will cover transformation processes of Opera production in South Africa focusing on the following topics:

  • Opera institutions & opera companies
  • Finances/ Funding
  • Audiences
  • Marketing
  • Political impact

Abstracts (max. 2000 characters) for 20 minutes papers along with the technical requirements for the talk and a short CV with contact details should be sent by 15th August 2018 to Lena van der Hoven (Lena.van-der-Hoven@uni-bayreuth.de). Contributions from both the humanities and social sciences are welcome (Musicology, Theatre Studies, History, Cultural Studies, Sociology). Early career researchers in particular are encouraged to contribute. The chosen speakers will be informed by 31th August 2018 and the conference programme published online at http://www.prof-musikwissenschaft.uni-bayreuth.de/de/index.html .