Music and Sonic Art: Sounding Identities

MuSA 2020 – St John’s College, University of Cambridge, UK
8 July – 10 July 2020


FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS:
We are delighted to announce the eleventh international conference on Music and Sonic Art: Sounding Identities (MuSA 2020), an interdisciplinary event to be held in St John’s College, University of Cambridge.
Keynote speaker: Prof Georgina Born, University of Oxford
Conference dates: Wednesday, 8 July – Friday, 10 July 2020.
Deadline for abstract submission: Friday, 10 April 2020.
The principal aim of MuSA 2020 is to advance interdisciplinary investigations in and between Music and Sonic Art, by exploring and building on the historical, theoretical and practical connections and continuities between these two areas. Proposals for individual papers are invited from academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students. All proposals will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed. The conference language will be English.

THEME AND TOPICS:
The theme of MuSA 2020 is Sounding Identities. The last couple of decades witnessed a remarkable burgeoning of research on how musical experiences and practices construct social, cultural, national, political, and artistic identities. During the same period, the boundaries between the traditionally distinct ways of engaging with music – i.e. as composer, performer, listener, producer, improvisor, music scholar and researcher – have begun to be questioned and challenged as new roles, practices and modes of interaction with music continue to emerge. The broad aim of this conference is to expand the remit of research on identity to all hearing, listening and art-making practices that use sound. We, therefore, invite submissions on the following, and other related topics:
• the artistic, cultural, social, institutional, national, disciplinary, political embodied and sensory (aural, visual, tactile) identities and agencies that are constructed through engagement with music and sonic art practices;
• how technologies mediate the construction of such identities;
• the material cultures that facilitate sounding identity formation;
• the emergence of new sounding identities through the cross-fertilization between musical and sonic art practices;
• fluidity and dynamics of identities across sounding cultural practices;
• sounding identities that challenge the mind/body and theory/practice dichotomies;
• sounding identities as sources of value;
• narratives and discourses of sounding identities;

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION:
Please submit an abstract of approximately 250 words in Word format to j.dack@mdx.ac.uk as an e-mail attachment.

As contributions will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed, please do not include information that might facilitate identification from the abstract. In addition, please submit separately the name(s) of the author(s), institutional affiliation (if any) and short biography (approximately 100 words).
Deadline for the receipt of abstracts is Friday, 10 April 2020. Notification of acceptance will be sent by Monday, 27 April 2020.

If additional information is required please contact Dr. Mine Doğantan-Dack or any member of the Conference Committee:
Dr Mine Doğantan-Dack (University of Cambridge, UK)
md787@cam.ac.uk
Dr John Dack (Middlesex University, UK)
j.dack@mdx.ac.uk
Dr Sean Williams (Open University, UK)
sean.williams@open.ac.uk
Dr Andrew King (University of Hull, UK)
a.king@hull.ac.uk
Prof Miroslav Spasov (Keele University, UK)
m.spasov@keele.ac.uk
Dr Christoph Seibert (University of Music Karlsruhe, Germany)
seibert@hfm-karlsruhe.de

Sound (of) Space Symposium

Please join us at the Sound (of) Space Symposium at UCL Here East, London on 11th December 2019

The Sound (of) Space Symposium will present a range of discussions around the challenges, creative opportunities and technical considerations when working with extreme and highly particular spatial conditions, across the related disciplines of architecture, engineering, music composition and performance.

The symposium will take place at UCL Here East on the 11th December 2019 and will include talks, presentations, performances and demonstrations from a wide range of academics and industry professionals including Prof. Trevor Cox (Uni.Salford), Adam Foxwell (Arup), Emma-Kate Matthews (UCL) and Freya Waley-Cohen (Royal Academy of Music), plus many more…

Please visit www.soundspacegroup.com to book your free ticket.

International Conference Rethinking The Three Cornered- Hat a century after

International Conference
Rethinking The Three-Cornered Hat After a century after


Where

Palacio de la Madraza, University of Granada, Spain.

When

3rd – 5th July 2019


Organisation

Fundación Archivo Manuel de Falla/Universidad de Granada/Universidad
Complutense de Madrid/Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

Collaboration

Festival Internacional de Música y Danza de Granada/Acción Cultural
Española/Ayuntamiento de Granada/Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte-INAEM

Registration and further details

Please, visit our website:

https://sombrero3picos.wixsite.com/congresosombrero

Conference outline


On 22nd July 1919, in the Alhambra Theatre in London, the Diaghilev Ballets Russes premiered
one of the most relevant works in the history of Western dance and music, the international
projection of Spanish culture and the configuration of the Spanishness imaginary. This ballet
was based on the adaptation of Pedro Antonio de Alarcón’s book by María Lejárraga, and had
a score by Manuel de Falla, set and costume designs by Pablo Picasso and a choreography by
Léonide Massine. Since that moment, the ballet has been performed a huge number of times
around the world, with versions by the most significant choreographers, and still lives in the
repertoire of some current dance companies.
Moreover, The Three-Cornered Hat has focused the attention of many critics and scholars, who
have built a large historiography throughout the years, both in Spain and abroad, which might

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

National Theater of São Carlos

(Lisbon Opera House)

Lisbon, Portugal

24—25 June, 2019

Keynote Speakers:

David J. Levin (University of Chicago / Department Cinema and Media Studies)

Martha Feldman [to be confirmed] (University of Chicago / Department of Music)

Paulo Ferreira de Castro (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Program Committee:

Jelena Novak (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

João Pedro Cachopo (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Mário Vieira de Carvalho (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

*

Since its inception in Italy around 1600, opera has maintained an intimate relationship with urban space and the public sphere. Most opera houses were erected in city centers and came to be seen both as secular temples and sites of entertainment in which the appreciation of high art coexisted with popular conviviality and the representation of social, political, and economic power. Just as the development of the operatic genre is inextricably linked to the rise of modern cities, it is also certain that much has changed since the inauguration of the first public opera house, the Teatro San Cassiano, in Venice, in 1637.

During the course of the twentieth-century, the emergence and advancement of new technologies of sound and image reproduction have been decisive factors in these transformations. It became possible to listen to and watch opera without attending a live performance. Further, after the introduction of synchronized sound in cinema, nothing prevented opera from being performed and recorded in places other than opera houses. Later, thanks to TV, live audio-visual broadcasts of opera became a reality, one which new digital technologies have enhanced ever since.

This conference seeks to assess technology’s impact on opera against the backdrop of its relationship to urbanity. The following question, in which issues of displacement and dissemination are weaved together, will stand at the centre of our discussions: how and to what extent did the development of audio-visual technologies allow for the visibility and audibility of opera beyond the theatre while at the same time encouraging its migration to other spaces? Many disparate practices invite this interrogation: from the live simulcasts that beam productions from opera houses to movie theatres, to the creation of new operas in town squares, train stations, old factories, swimming pools, and public transportation, not to mention community-oriented projects such as The Bicycle Opera Project or Operndorf Afrika, and open-air festivals, including the Arena di Verona Festival and the “Festival ao Largo” promoted by the National Theater of São Carlos (Lisbon Opera House).

Despite its widely reputed decline, opera is presently enjoying a moment of surprising vitality. This is true in the fields of reception and production alike, as new forms of staging and creating opera are being experimented with every year. By addressing the link between opera, technology, and the city, this conference will also attempt to draw attention to this very vitality. We hope to stimulate as broad an exchange and as open an inquiry as possible, encompassing issues of dramaturgy, criticism, spectatorship, remediation, technology, and composition, among others.

*

We welcome proposals from both scholars and practitioners across disciplines for 20-minute long papers exploring any of the above-mentioned topics. Please submit your abstract (of up to 250 words) to propera2020@gmail.com no later than April 15, 2019. The program will be announced in early May. This international conference is organized within the scope of the project “PROPERA – The Profanation of Opera: Music and Drama on Film” (funded through the European Commission under a Marie Skłodowska Curie Action) and is co-sponsored by the Centro de Estudos de Sociologia e Estética Musical (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas / Universidade Nova de Lisboa). More information here.

RASMB-IMS 2019 Conference: MUSICAL AND CULTURAL OSMOSES IN THE BALKANS

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019

Call for Papers

The National University of Music in Bucharest in collaboration with the IMS Regional Association for the Study of Music of the Balkans announce an International Musicological Conference on the subject Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans. The conference will take place at the National University of Music Bucharest, on 2–6 September, 2019.

The purpose of the International Musicological Conference is to promote interaction, research, discussion and intercultural dialogue among musicologists, ethnomusicologists, researchers and students from Romania, the Balkans and other countries with an interest on the different local musical traditions in South-East Europe and their interactions to the Mediterranean and broader region.

The conference strongly encourages debating subjects such as art music in the Balkans and its interactions with Western Europe traditions, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine chant, methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Ethnomusicology/Music Anthropology of the Balkans, current issues and approaches in Music Education in the Balkans, music and political regimes.

Proposal may address (but are not limited to) the following categories that fall under the topic of the conference:

  1. Art Music in the Balkans
  2. Byzantine and post-Byzantine chant
  3. Musical encounters: Silk roads across Mediterranean area to Asia
  4. Ethnomusicology – Anthropology
  5. Methodologies and new trends in Musicology and Music Theory
  6. Music and politics

The official conference language is English. However, participants can present in Romanian, having submitted prior to the conference and at a set deadline a translation of the final paper in English.

Proposals are invited for:

  • 20-minute papers
  • Panels of up to four presentations (90 minutes).

Abstracts of 20-minute papers should not exceed 300 words and panels’ proposals should contain the description of the panel’s subject (no more than 100 words) and an abstract (no more than 300 words) for each paper included in the panel.

All proposals should be sent electronically as an attachment to the following email address: IMS2019bucharest@unmb.ro with the subject line: Musical and Cultural Osmoses in the Balkans.

The attachment should include the following information as well:

  • Name(s) of the author(s) and institution affiliation (if applicable)
  • Type of proposal
  • Title of the paper/panel proposal
  • Short biographical note of the author(s) (100 words)

Full audiovisual equipment and adequate technical support is available for all presentations.

Important dates:

  • Abstracts of proposals/panels: no later than 22 February 2019
  • Notification of approval: no later than 22 March 2019
  • Submission of finalised papers (only in cases of translated papers from Romanian to English): no later than 1 August 2019

Registration fees:

Participants: 30 Euros (10 Euros for students, including PhD candidates)

Date and venue:

Bucharest, 2–6 September, 2019, National University of Music Bucharest, 33 Știrbei Vodă Str., Sector 1, 010102 Bucharest, Romania (http://www.unmb.ro).

Contact information:

Further instructions and details will soon be posted on the conference webpage: ims2019bucharest.ro.
See also: http://www.musicology.org/networks/ra/rasmb
Announcements will also appear on the webpage of the National University of Music Bucharest (http://www.unmb.ro) and the New Europe College (http://www.nec.ro).

Symposium and Workshop: South African Opera Productions after the Apartheid

Venue: Universität Bayreuth

Date:   18th– 19th October 2018

Call for Papers:

Deadline: 15th August 2018

With the end of the Apartheid era, opera – stigmatized as ‘eurocentric opera’ – became a symbol of Western dominance/colonial imposition and seemed to be dead in South Africa.

But in fact, especially the so called ‘indigenous opera’ ‘flourishes’ as something of an anachronism and can be assessed as ‘black empowerment’ (Naomi André 2018).

The writing of a historiography of opera productions in South Africa although has academically just shortly started (Donato Somma 2016; Hilde Roos 2013, 2010; Martina Viljoen 2006) and is confronted with problems of different natures: political structures, post-colonization, globalization, unstable artistic standards and institutional relations.

The ‘bloom’ of opera presents itself neither through regular performances nor through crowded theatre halls. This is a consequence of the difficult political relations of artistic production in South Africa, which are among others characterized by a lack of funding and the re-organization of the Performing Arts Councils/ National Arts Councils. The existing significant multiple theatricalities of South Africa are thereby not having a platform to present themselves. The market pressure results often in overseas productions financing the few performances in the country itself. Thereby putting itself on risk to confirm with their opera productions transferred expectations of a South African identity rather than expressing an ‘authentic’ one.

This symposium will focus on South African Opera productions. Thereby the aim of the symposium is to represent the plurality of artistic concepts that deal in different ways with the multiple challenges of political and social transformation. How can opera in South Africa be involved in the process of societal transformation in a post-apartheid society? Which new artistic concepts are needed? How does themes for the libretti change? How did language, the style of composition and orchestration transform? Which new locations for performances are found to involve new audiences? How did the aesthetics change? And how are new media used either for a new aesthetic of performances, as with e.g. ‘Lamento’ (Umculo) or ‘U-Carmen eKhayelitsha’ (Isango Ensemble), or for marketing purposes?

For the first day of the symposium presentations shall focus on one opera productions. To ‘map’ the plurality of the field presentations are invited that cover one of the following topics.

  1. South African opera productions
  • Operas of different opera companies and composers
  • Different locations of opera performances (opera house, township, film)
  • Aesthetics of the opera opus itself
  • Analysis of compositions, libretti & performances

With Prof. Dr. Naomi André (University Michigan, USA), Dr. Donato Somma (University of Witwatersrand, SA) and Dr. Lena van der Hoven (among others) some experts in the field are invited. They will present on ‘Winnie – The Opera’ (Bongani Ndodana-Breen), ‘Princess Magogo’ (Opera Africa, Mzilikazi Khumalo), ‘Heart of Redness’ (Cape Town Opera, Neo Muyanga) and ‘Romeo’s Passion’ (Umculo, Cathy Milliken).

The workshop on the second day will cover transformation processes of Opera production in South Africa focusing on the following topics:

  • Opera institutions & opera companies
  • Finances/ Funding
  • Audiences
  • Marketing
  • Political impact

Abstracts (max. 2000 characters) for 20 minutes papers along with the technical requirements for the talk and a short CV with contact details should be sent by 15th August 2018 to Lena van der Hoven (Lena.van-der-Hoven@uni-bayreuth.de). Contributions from both the humanities and social sciences are welcome (Musicology, Theatre Studies, History, Cultural Studies, Sociology). Early career researchers in particular are encouraged to contribute. The chosen speakers will be informed by 31th August 2018 and the conference programme published online at http://www.prof-musikwissenschaft.uni-bayreuth.de/de/index.html .

 

 

Church Music and Worship Conference

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Following on the from the success of the York Conference on Church Music held in February 2017, the organising committee for Church Music & Worship invite proposals for this two-day international conference to be held in the Pemberton Rooms at Durham University and Prior’s Hall at Durham Cathedral on the 27 and 28 April 2018.

Our Keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Jeremy Dibble (Professor in the Department of Music, Durham University) & The Rev’d Dr Maggi Dawn (Dean of Marquand Chapel, and Associate Professor of Theology and Literature, Yale University, USA).

Conference website

 

Call for Papers

We invite researchers and practitioners to submit proposals which engage with a range of methodologies and perspectives on church music and worship, from academic and practice-based viewpoints. Proposals are encouraged on the broad theme of church music and worship which may address, but need not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Church music and liturgy
  • Church music and the media
  • Church music compositional practice
  • Church music, gender, and sexualities
  • Historical perspectives on Church music
  • International perspectives on Church music
  • Theologies of musical worship

Please find information on the next two pages about how to submit a proposal and our supporters. Any questions at all may be directed to the chair of the conference committee, Enya Doyle, at churchmusicandworship@gmail.com

Submission Information

We particularly welcome submissions from postgraduate students.

We also welcome scholars who may want to or have to bring children with them.

Individual Papers

Proposals for papers should be sent as abstracts of not more than 350 words. Individual papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

—-

Panels

Proposals for organised panels of 3 speakers (1 ½ hours) and 4 speakers (2 hours) should submit a panel abstract (200 words) and individual abstracts (350 words each) in a single document together with the full names and email addresses of the participants. Questions about the organisation of panels should be directed to churchmusicandworship@gmail.com

—-

The following format should be used for proposals (send in a word doc or pdf):

  1. Name, affiliation (if applicable), and e-mail address;
  2. Type of presentation (paper, lecture recital, panel, or poster);
  3. Title of presentation;
  4. Abstract (350 words max);
  5. Audio-visual and other requirements (the following are available: Data projector or large plasma screen; Desktop PC; VGA, HDMI and 3.5mm audio inputs; CD player; DVD player; Visualiser; Piano)
  6. Brief Biography (150 words)

Questions, queries, and proposals should be sent to the chair of the conference committee, Enya Doyle, at churchmusicandworship@gmail.com

The deadline for proposals is 23:59 on January 15 2018

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era. International Conference celebrating 475 Years of the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona

immagine della Santissima Vergine Maria di Loreto della Giara in Verona, Stamperia del Seminario, Padova 1714 Domenico Zanatta Venezia 1665 Verona 5 agosto 1748

Verona, 1-3 June 2018

Call for Papers 
Deadline for proposals: 31 December 2017

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era is an international conference organized by the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona on the occasion of the 475th anniversary of its foundation (23 May 1543), in collaboration with University of Verona, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, University of St Andrews and Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona.
Natural sequel to The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, 24-27 May 2017 – vmo.unive.it/soundscape2017), this further initiative has the aim of increasing debate on the varied soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the early modern period. This territory, which stretched from Bergamo in the west to the Friulian Alps in the north-east and the river Po at the Republic’s southern extremity, formed one of the three subdivisions of the Serenissima; the others were the Dogado (Venice and surrounding area) and the Stato da mar (Venetian possessions in the eastern Adriatic and Mediterranean areas). The articulate system that regulates musical and non-musical sound in the Venetian territories prior to the fall of the Serenissima in 1797 is highly conducive to an interdisciplinary approach which draws on the new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology. Emblematic, in this sense, are the activities of the Accademia Filarmonica, which have dominated almost five centuries of local musical history.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

The conference will take place in Verona from 1-3 June 2018.

Suggested topics: 
– Sound and urban identity
– The sound of local civic ceremonial and devotional activities
– Reciprocal influence of Venetian and Terraferma soundscapes
– Musical relationships between the Terraferma cities and the courts of northern Italy and elsewhere
– Music and society (patronage; academies and other musical institutions, private and public; private uses of music)
– Educational, philosophical and social dynamics in musical practice
– The sounds of public and private festivities
– Musical theatre in the Terraferma and its social impact
– Music, urban architecture and the visual arts
– Music and economics (music printing, production and commerce of musical instruments, the economics of performance)
– Sound as material and non-material cultural heritage

One session of the conference will be entirely dedicated to research on the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona.

Peer-reviewed contributions will be published in a dedicated volume, scheduled to appear in 2019.

*** 

The programme committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, with 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Please email abstracts (max. 250 words), together with a short biography, to: biblioteca@academiafilarmonica.191.it

Further information will be available from September 2017 on the conference website, which will continue to be updated with details of costs, events and accommodation near the conference venue.

Accepted proposals will be announced before 16 February 2018.

*** 

Organizing Committee: 
Alessandro Arcangeli (University of Verona)
Vincenzo Borghetti (University of Verona)
David Douglas Bryant (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)
Luigi Collarile (University of Geneva)
Michele Magnabosco (Accademia Filarmonica, Verona)
Laura Moretti (University of St Andrews)
Laura Och (Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona)

For further information please contact
Michele Magnabosco: biblioteca@accademiafilarmonica.191.it

http://www.accademiafilarmonica.org/filarmonica/en/convegno-internazionale-2018/

 

RMA Music and/as Process Study Group 6th Annual Conference

Call for Papers/Lecture Performances
Conference: Music and Language Friday 29th June – Sunday 1st July, 2018
Edinburgh Napier University, School of Arts and Creative Industries, Merchiston Campus

We welcome proposals for contributions in the following formats:

  • Paper (20 minutes + 10 minutes questions)
  • Lecture Recital (30 minutes)
  • Participatory lecture/workshop (30 minutes)

The theme of the conference is Music and Language, both spoken and written.

Whilst the Music and/as Process Study Group has previously been aimed towards the field of music, the call remains open to practitioners and researchers within the spoken arts, and sound poetry and beyond who are drawn towards an association with the theme.

Particular themes covered might include:

  • Sound Poetry Linguistic processes in composition and new music performance
  • Oulipo
  • Radio art (or Hörspiel)
  • Concrete Poetry / Phonetic art / Lautpoesie
  • Spoken/Written Language in the construction of new music/performance/creative work
  • Interactive spoken word performance
  • Translation

Proposals should include all of the details of the proposed contribution:

  • the name(s) of presenter(s)
  • email address of presenter(s)
  • affiliated academic institution
  • title of paper/lecture-recital/workshop
  • 200-word abstract
  • [for participatory workshops only] description of the format of the workshop
  • A full list of any technical requirements and other resources

 

Please send your proposals by email to Alistair Zaldua: alistair.zaldua@canterbury.ac.uk
Deadline for proposals: Friday, 09 March 2018 Notification of successful presentations can be expected in late March 2018.

In your proposal please clearly indicate all of the presenters, including any performers if you do not intend to perform your own work. Unfortunately, the study group is not able to provide any financial assistance to attend the conference, or to support the creation or performance of works at the conference.

All presenters and performers will be required to register and pay the conference fee. At present we are working to keep this as low as possible, and we do not anticipate it being higher than £50, with a discount for students, unaffiliated ECRs, and RMA members.

A ‘Musical League of Nations’?: Music Institutions and the Politics of Internationalism – a Symposium

29-30 June 2018, Institute of Musical Research, Senate House, London

CFP: Proposals due by 1 Nov. 2017

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Anne Shreffler (Harvard University)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

‘What art is better adapted to form an international connecting-link, than music?—especially instrumental music, which is in a manner an international language, an expression of the most intimate, the profoundest emotions of man.’ – Guido Adler, 1925

The notion that instrumental music is either ‘universal’ or ‘international’ in any real sense has been discredited. Even as Adler’s comment draws upon an older notion of music as a ‘universal language’ and adapts it to the language of interwar political internationalism, he acknowledges the limitations of music to foster communication between nations, and writes that it should be the aim of research to discern the interaction between artistic phenomena that are ‘common property’ or the result of ‘nature’ on the one hand, and those that are the result of ‘culture’, and therefore localized, on the other.

The role of music and musicians in forging international links either between or beyond national boundaries can sometimes seem unproblematic or even emancipatory, under the assumption that music can be socially transformative. Yet just as the project of political internationalism between and after the World Wars was not without its challenges, so too did musical initiatives sometimes find themselves in positions of compromise, ethical conflict or co-option into unintended agendas.

This two-day symposium will focus on music institutions and initiatives that were explicitly shaped by the project of internationalism during the twentieth century. Organisations such as the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), the International Musicological Society (IMS), as well as a range of smaller musical meetings throughout Europe and America during the interwar and post-war periods, subscribed to a similar set of ideological precepts. These organisations and meetings did not only involve musical composition and performance, or academic discussion, but they also often included public congresses that prompted debate around issues that went far beyond the simple celebration of international cooperation, or of music as an expression of a common humanity. They grappled with the contradiction between the idea of a non-national music or music scholarship and the decidedly national inflections of musical autonomy itself, and they struggled to reconcile the fact that music’s putative detachment from the social realm was what gave it its ‘universal’ potential, yet the project of internationalism was a political one, struck through with ideas about social justice and ethical responsibility.

The symposium will explore the musical, political and aesthetic dimensions of the discourse that surrounded the establishment of these organisations and their activities throughout the politically-charged twentieth century.

We welcome proposals (250 words) for individual papers or panels. Please send proposals to Sarah Collins at musical.league.of.nations@gmail.com by 1 Nov. 2017. Acceptances to be advised by early December.

 

Conference Organisers (and programme committee):

Sarah Collins (Durham University)

Laura Tunbridge (Oxford University)

Barbara Kelly (Royal Northern College of Music)

 

Conference Supporters:

Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Additional funding from the British Academy/Leverhulme Small Grants Scheme