IMS2022: 21st Quinquennial IMS Congress

Location: Athens, Greece
Dates: August 22–26, 2022

The 21st Quinquennial IMS Congress (IMS2022) will be held in Athens, Greece, from August 22 to 26, 2022. It is sponsored by the Hellenic Musicological Society under the aegis of the Department of Music Studies of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the Department of Music Studies of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Conference website: https://www.musicology.org/ims2022

The Mediterranean: Migrant Sounds

Location: Valencia, Spain
Dates: July 23–26, 2019

3rd Meeting of the IMS Study Group “Mediterranean Music Studies”
The 3rd meeting of the IMS Study Group “Mediterranean Music Studies” will be held in Valencia, Spain, during the 2nd International Conference of the Associació Valenciana de Musicologia, entitled The Mediterranean: Migrant Sounds, which is taking place from July 23 to 26, 2019.

Conference website: http://avamus.org/en/2019-conference

47th MedRen Music Conference

Location: Basel, Switzerland
Dates: July 3–6, 2019

The IMS Study Group “Musical Iconography” will feature prominently at the 47th Med­Ren Music Conference, hosted by the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, Basel, Switzerland, in July 2019, with a panel of nine papers (in three sessions): “Early Music Iconography: Methodological Worlds and Cultural Intersections.”

Conference website: https://medren2019basel.com

Atlantic Crossings: Music from 1492 through the Long 18th Century

Location: Boston, USA
Dates: June 7–8, 2019

The IMS Study Group “Early Music and the New World” will hold an open meeting during the session “From Colonies to Republics: Latin American Music in Transition, 1770–1825,” at the international conference Atlantic Crossings: Music from 1492 through the Long 18th Century at Boston University, USA, June 7 to 8, 2019.

Conference website: http://www.bu.edu/earlymusic/2018/09/26/program

Music as Heritage: from Tradition to Product

Central European University invites application to a 10-day summer school held in Budapest on July 1-10, 2019 from practicing professionals as well as graduate students and junior researchers active in the field of research and teaching of related subjects (musicology, ethnography, heritage studies in its broadest sense, management, marketing and tourism studies, minority studies, etc.). Advanced undergraduate students will also be considered.

The course explores various aspects of musical heritage management creating audience development-focused, yet socially conscious business policies – a contemporary and viable approach to responsible arts management. It also includes a field trip providing both a unique opportunity to get further insights into research methods and a real-life experience of traditional music.

Course faculty includes distinguished scholars like Martin Stokes (Department of Music, King’s College London, UK) and Jonathan Stock (School of Music and Theatre, University College Cork, Ireland).

Extended deadline for applications is May 15. More information on the course website .

photo credit: Everengine

REEM-BASEES 2019 Annual Conference – In memoriam Stuart Campbell

BASEES Study Group for Russian and Eastern European Music (REEM)

Saturday 12 October 2019

Durham University

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 2019 BASEES-REEM annual conference will be held in memoriam Stuart Campbell (1949–2018), a notable scholar of Russian music who held the posts of Lecturer in Music, University Organist, and Director of Chapel Music at the University of Glasgow from 1975 to 2000. His publications included two anthologies of Russian music criticism, Russians On Russian Music (Cambridge University Press), and he contributed entries on Russian topics to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, and other reference works. A member of the editorial board overseeing the production of a new Complete Works of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Dr Campbell was also a co-founder and conductor of the Glasgow-based choir Russkaya Cappella and a notable advocate of Orthodox liturgical music.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute presentations that explore themes germane to Stuart Campbell’s research interests, including:

  • Music criticism in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Eastern Orthodox sacred music
  • The Russian and Eastern European musical diaspora
  • Music and film

The official language is English.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words and short biographical notes (c.200 words) should be sent to reemstudygroup@gmail.com by 31 May 2019. Abstracts will be reviewed and the results announced by mid-June.

REEM has a modest amount of money available to assist speakers, especially postgraduates and those without access to other funds, with the costs of attending. If you would like to be considered for such funding, which is likely to cover only a portion of your travel and/or accommodation expenses, please indicate this in your proposal.

Convenors: Anastasia Belina, Philip Bullock, Katerina Levidou, Ivana Medić, Danijela Š. Beard, and Patrick Zuk.
Enquiries should be sent to reemstudygroup@gmail.com

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

National Theater of São Carlos

(Lisbon Opera House)

Lisbon, Portugal

24—25 June, 2019

Keynote Speakers:

David J. Levin (University of Chicago / Department Cinema and Media Studies)

Martha Feldman [to be confirmed] (University of Chicago / Department of Music)

Paulo Ferreira de Castro (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Program Committee:

Jelena Novak (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

João Pedro Cachopo (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Mário Vieira de Carvalho (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

*

Since its inception in Italy around 1600, opera has maintained an intimate relationship with urban space and the public sphere. Most opera houses were erected in city centers and came to be seen both as secular temples and sites of entertainment in which the appreciation of high art coexisted with popular conviviality and the representation of social, political, and economic power. Just as the development of the operatic genre is inextricably linked to the rise of modern cities, it is also certain that much has changed since the inauguration of the first public opera house, the Teatro San Cassiano, in Venice, in 1637.

During the course of the twentieth-century, the emergence and advancement of new technologies of sound and image reproduction have been decisive factors in these transformations. It became possible to listen to and watch opera without attending a live performance. Further, after the introduction of synchronized sound in cinema, nothing prevented opera from being performed and recorded in places other than opera houses. Later, thanks to TV, live audio-visual broadcasts of opera became a reality, one which new digital technologies have enhanced ever since.

This conference seeks to assess technology’s impact on opera against the backdrop of its relationship to urbanity. The following question, in which issues of displacement and dissemination are weaved together, will stand at the centre of our discussions: how and to what extent did the development of audio-visual technologies allow for the visibility and audibility of opera beyond the theatre while at the same time encouraging its migration to other spaces? Many disparate practices invite this interrogation: from the live simulcasts that beam productions from opera houses to movie theatres, to the creation of new operas in town squares, train stations, old factories, swimming pools, and public transportation, not to mention community-oriented projects such as The Bicycle Opera Project or Operndorf Afrika, and open-air festivals, including the Arena di Verona Festival and the “Festival ao Largo” promoted by the National Theater of São Carlos (Lisbon Opera House).

Despite its widely reputed decline, opera is presently enjoying a moment of surprising vitality. This is true in the fields of reception and production alike, as new forms of staging and creating opera are being experimented with every year. By addressing the link between opera, technology, and the city, this conference will also attempt to draw attention to this very vitality. We hope to stimulate as broad an exchange and as open an inquiry as possible, encompassing issues of dramaturgy, criticism, spectatorship, remediation, technology, and composition, among others.

*

We welcome proposals from both scholars and practitioners across disciplines for 20-minute long papers exploring any of the above-mentioned topics. Please submit your abstract (of up to 250 words) to propera2020@gmail.com no later than April 15, 2019. The program will be announced in early May. This international conference is organized within the scope of the project “PROPERA – The Profanation of Opera: Music and Drama on Film” (funded through the European Commission under a Marie Skłodowska Curie Action) and is co-sponsored by the Centro de Estudos de Sociologia e Estética Musical (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas / Universidade Nova de Lisboa). More information here.

International Forum for Young Art Researchers Science Spring – 2019

Tuesday 16 April – Friday 19 April 2019

State Institute for Art Studies. Moscow, Russia

Call for Papers

‘Science Spring’ Forum is the unique annual scientific event for young researchers of art and culture. The initiative, concept and program development of the Forum belongs to SIAS Ph.D. students.

Our goal is to invite colleagues to a scientific dialogue as well as share our own experience, talk about themes and methodology of our research and discuss the controversial issues of our works.

Forum statement:

Where’s the revolution? Search for new approaches in the Metamodernism era

Potential topics for discussion:

  • Art perception and interpretation – modern experience
  • Nature as a source and space of artistic ideas
  • Teatralization as an artistic method
  • Communications mechanisms of influence in art
  • Communications mechanisms of understanding in art studies

We accept participation requests from:

  • Art researchers of all specialties
  • Philologists
  • Philosophers of art and culture
  • Theorists and historians of culture
  • Experts in music and theater, artists
  • Museologists, curators

Forum audience is welcome to take part in discussions. Anyone can join discussions and feel him/herself a part of the young scientific community. This is especially important for students who are just starting their journey in science.

If you wish to participate in the Forum, please send your application till February 15, 2019 to: sciencespring@yandex.ru

We accept applications filled out according to the approved form (see below). Applications filled out not in accordance with the form and with violations of the requirements will not be accepted.

Participation in absentia is not permitted.

Participants will bear the costs of travel and accommodation.

Forum venue: Moscow, Kozitsky Lane, 5.

Organizing committee

SIAS PhD students:

N. Ruchkina, E. Sakovskaya, E. Miroshnikova, A. Orlova, E. Fomina, V. Aleksandrova, N. Kiryanova, V. Voytekunas.

sciencespring@yandex.ru

https://www.facebook.com/groups/sciencespring

https://vk.com/sciencespring

https://www.instagram.com/sciencespring

APPLICATION FORM

Applications are accepted till February 15, 2019 at sciencespring@yandex.ru

Applications filled out not in accordance with the form and with violations of the requirements will not be considered.

  1. INFORMATION ABOUT THE PARTICIPANT:
Full name 
 Contact details
e-mail 
Phone number+
Place of study (please indicate fully, but without faculty and department) 
Status (please underline)• undergraduate student • graduate student • postgraduate student • independent researcher
Research topic (e.g. master or doctoral thesis) 
Main scientific interests 

Supervisor of studies

Full name 
Academic degree / Academic title 
e-mail 
  • PARTICIPATION INFORMATION:
Participation form (please underline)conference (report)panel discussion
Special technical requirements: besides a laptop and a projector (indicate if required) 
Subject of the paper: 

Abstract:

(Not less than 1000 and not more than 3000–3500 characters, including spaces)

Centennial Reflections on Women’s Suffrage and the Arts

CENTENNIAL REFLECTIONS ON WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE AND THE ARTS

Local : National : Transnational

An international, multi-disciplinary public conference

University of Surrey, UK, 29–30 June 2018

Keynote Speakers:

  • Irene Cockroft, author of Women in the Arts & Crafts and Suffrage Movements at the Dawn of the 20th Century
  • Elizabeth Crawford, author of The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Britain and Ireland

CFP: deadline for submissions 26 January 2018

Conference website: www.suffragecentennial.wordpress.com

The 2018 centenary of the Representation of the People Act (6 February 1918), which granted the vote to many women in the UK, yields an ideal opportunity for sustained critical reflection on women’s suffrage. This conference seeks to explore the artistic activities nurtured within the movement, their range and legacy, as well as the relationships between politics and art. In striving for an inclusive, transnational reach, it will at the same time seek to move beyond traditional emphases on white middle-class feminism and explore the intersections between the regional, national, and global contexts for women’s suffrage with specific respect to the arts.

While proposals addressing any aspects of women’s suffrage will be welcomed, this conference will focus upon three strands:

  1. Women’s suffrage in/and the arts
  2. Women’s suffrage in Surrey and the surrounds
  3. Transnational networks and flows of texts in relation to women’s suffrage

20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of these strands, including but not limited to:

  • Late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century women’s writing on suffrage;
  • Political reflections on the arts and the cultural sphere, e.g. in music;
  • Transnational networks and mobilities of political texts and ideas, incorporating suffrage movements in other countries;
  • Politically active individuals with strong links to Surrey (particularly in relation to the arts) e.g. Mary Watts, Dame Ethel Smyth, Gertrude Jekyll, Marion Wallace Dunlop;
  • Networks such as Ferguson’s Gang, Surrey Hills Group, Surrey Pilgrimage Group, and women who organised suffrage marches;
  • Sociological theories of women’s suffrage;
  • Contributions of women of colour to suffrage movements in Britain and globally;
  • Art (both historical and contemporary) inspired by women’s suffrage.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for one-hour roundtables of 3–5 participants. We encourage proposals from postgraduate students and independent scholars in addition to institutionally-affiliated established academics.

Planned activities include a panel discussion featuring artists who have been active in performing and creating works based on women’s suffrage and some of its key figures; and a recital of music and readings. We envisage that an edited publication will be developed from papers presented at the conference.

Abstracts of not more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 26 January 2018 to suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk. Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 23 February 2018. A limited number of student bursaries may be offered to offset costs of attendance.

Conference Committee: Christopher Wiley, Charlotte Mathieson, Lucy Ella Rose (co-chairs)

Enquiries: suffragecentennial@surrey.ac.uk

Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research

‘BEYOND “MESEARCH”: AUTOETHNOGRAPHY, SELF-REFLEXIVITY, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AS ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN MUSIC STUDIES’

Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16-17 April 2018, Senate House, London

*NB This event has now been expanded to a two-day conference*

Registration: https://store.surrey.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/fass-faculty-of-arts-social-sciences/conferences/autoethnography-selfreflexivity-and-personal-experience-in-music-studies-1617-april-2018

Provisional Programme: https://christopherwiley.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/imr-conference-programme-provisional-16-17-04-18.pdf

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk