International Conference “Rethinking The Three-Cornered Hat A Hundred Years Later”

Palacio de la Madraza, University of Granada, Spain, 3rd – 5th July 2019 – Deadline: March 1st 2019

On 22nd July 1919, in the Alhambra Theatre in London, the Diaghilev Ballets Russes premiered one of the most relevant works in the history of Western dance and music, the international projection of Spanish culture and the configuration of the Spanishness imaginary. This ballet was based on the adaptation of Pedro Antonio de Alarcón’s book by María Lejárraga, and had a score by Manuel de Falla, set and costume designs by Pablo Picasso and a choreography by Léonide Massine. Since that moment, the ballet has been performed a huge number of times around the world, with versions by the most significant choreographers, and still lives in the repertoire of some current dance companies.


Moreover, The Three-Cornered Hat has focused the attention of many critics and scholars, who have built a large historiography throughout the years, both in Spain and abroad, which might
be advisable to review. The work becomes a relevant and complex creation where concepts such as the construction of stereotypes, the national identity, the authentic, the popular, and the joining of tradition and avant-garde are interwoven. Not many works have had such an impact on the spreading of the Spanish dance beyond its borders, of Picasso’s aesthetic innovations where his paintings had never been shown before, of Falla’s music, which has been played and versioned over and over again, being submitted to a constant process of resignification.


Therefore, this international conference proposes celebrating the centenary of this milestone which allowed the convergence of so many prominent Spanish and international artists, studying its world impact and assessing its contributions in dance, music, visual arts and literature.
With all these objectives, this scientific meeting is settled from an interdisciplinary perspective, which gathers the most recent research in dance history, musicology, history of art and philology, but also in other related areas, like sociology, philosophy, anthropology, communication, fashion, etc.


Papers may address, but are not limited to, the following topics: – Analysis of different aspects in choreography, musical language, scenography, costume design, and libretto of the original The Three-Cornered Hat version of 1919. – Study of the impact and critical fortune that The Three-Cornered Hat had in the different places where it has been performed. – Convergence of the work with other artistic international movements in the same historical and cultural context. – Analysis of the different The Three-Cornered Hat versions up to the present. – Influence of The Three Cornered Hat in the 20th and 21st centuries. – Spanishness in The Three-Cornered Hat and its derivations.

PAPER PROPOSALS The oral presentations will have a duration of 15 minutes. Papers will be admitted in Spanish, English and French. For submitting a proposal, an abstract of a maximum of 2,000 characters and a brief CV are to be submitted to sombrero3picos@ugr.es before 1st March 2019. The selection of papers by the Scientific Committee will be communicated by mail and will be considered for publication.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

Juan Aguilera Sastre (IES Inventor Cosme García, Logroño)
Antonio Álvarez Cañibano (Centro de Documentación de Música y Danza – INAEM)
Miguel Cabañas Bravo (Instituto de Historia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas) Eugenio Carmona (Universidad de Málaga)
Emilio Casares Rodicio (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Michael Christoforidis (University of Melbourne)
Chris Collins (Bangor University)
Lynn Garafola (Columbia University, Nueva York)
Mª Luz González Peña (Archivo SGAE)
Carol A. Hess (University of California Davis)
Beatriz Martínez del Fresno (Universidad de Oviedo)
Elna Matamoros Ocaña (Compañía Nacional de Danza)
Antonio Najarro (Ballet Nacional de España)
Yvan Nommick (Université Paul-Valéry de Montpellier III)
Emilio Peral Vega (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Gemma Pérez Zalduondo (Universidad de Granada)

INFORMATION All the questions should be sent to: sombrero3picos@ugr.es Web: https://sombrero3picos.wixsite.com/congresosombrero

Organisation: Fundación Archivo Manuel de Falla/Universidad de Granada/Universidad Complutense de Madrid/Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

Collaboration: Festival Internacional de Música y Danza de Granada/Acción Cultural Española/Ayuntamiento de Granada/Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte-INAEM

Bach Network Dialogue Meeting 2019

The ninth Bach Network Dialogue Meeting will be held at the historic house of Madingley Hall, Cambridge, from Monday 8 to Saturday morning 13 July 2019, with the formal programme running from the afternoon of Tuesday 9 to Thursday evening 11 July. By popular request we have again included a day before and after the formal programme, to facilitate networking, research discussions and the practicalities of travel.

The full programme can be accessed here.

The programme will feature sessions on a range of current topics, including the Bach 333 project, Bach and materiality, the Art of Fugue, Bach’s chorale pedagogy, musical authorship, and Bach’s contemporaries, as well as our ever-popular Early Career Forum and Flash Announcement session. Presenters and panellists will include Christine Blanken, Isabella van Elferen, Nicholas Kenyon, Kevin Korsyn, Robin A. Leaver, Michael Marissen, Paul Moseley, Derek K. Remeš, Barbara M. Reul, Stephen Roe, Stephen Rose, Joel Speerstra, Ruth Tatlow, Bettina Varwig, Christoph Wolff and Steven Zohn. In addition, we are delighted to welcome renowned harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani for an evening lecture recital, and director Paul Spicer to lead a choral singing session.

The schedule is designed with generous open discussion time, to give every delegate an opportunity to engage with the subjects. Every registered delegate is invited to speak for five minutes about their current research at the Flash Announcement Session. We encourage doctoral and post-doctoral students to present a short summary of their research topic at the Early Career Forum. There will also be time over meals and in the wonderful gardens to continue discussions informally.

Please register at www.bach2019.eventbrite.com

Contact: Mark Seow, Administrator of Bach Network Dialogue Meeting 2019
seow.bachnetwork@gmail.com

International Conference of Young Musicologists. Young Musicology Today: tendencies, challenges and perspectives

The aim of the conference is to integrate the musicological community through the creation of an international forum for exchanging ideas and research experiences. We encourage young musicologists to present results from ongoing studies and to engage in discussion on the future of musicology, its role and place in the contemporary culture. Currently, musicology, which is not only the study of music, is starting to perform social functions, becoming not only a field of scientific inquiry but one of use to society. During the conference, we would like to consider new avenues of research, new methodologies of musicologists’ work, and the challenges and career prospects faced by musicologists entering the labour market. It will also be an opportunity to consider the subject areas of interest to young musicology.

Subject areas for consideration include

  • New research perspectives in musicology
  • Music versus other arts
  • Music in the public space (sonosphere research)
  • Music in society (music and ideologies)
  • Music and the sacred
  • Music and science (e.g. psychology of music)
  • Challenges of modern ethnomusicology
  • The state and the form of contemporary music criticism
  • Source studies and music editing
  • Music librarianship – issues and challenges
  • Performance practice
  • Theory of music
  • Music and pop culture
  • Opera nowadays

The conference will incorporate both traditional lectures and panel discussions, during which groups of researchers conducting a joint project or studying similar subjects will be able to present the results of their studies or discuss a specific subject. We encourage the participants to organise their own panel sessions during the conference (due to time constraints, we suggest no more than four papers during one session; please indicate the person leading the session during registration).

In addition, the conference programme includes:

  • “A musicologist on the labour market” panel

This will be an opportunity for an in-depth discussion of the current employment situation of musicology graduates in Poland and abroad, and for the presentation of experiences in this area. We encourage participation in this panel session by musicologists – musical life animators, employees of media and cultural and educational associations and institutions etc.

  • Masters’ lectures (plenary speakers)
  • The conference programme includes additional events, such as concerts, sightseeing in Krakow, and exhibitions.

A publication of the collected papers presented at the conference is also planned.

Conference language: English.

Schedule

  • Accepting applications with abstracts – until 31th of May 2016.
  • Information about accepted papers – by 30 June 2016.
  • Conference dates: 7-9 November 2016.

Applications should be made by sending the application form via email to: agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl  and musicologytoday@gmail.com

You can find an application form here.

For any further information please feel free to contact: Agnieszka Lakner; agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl

Conference fee

Conference fee: 200,00 PLN / 50 €

The fee includes:

Admission to the conference, conference program, publication of the paper in the conference proceedings, lunches and coffee breaks during sessions and conference attractions such as sightseeing and concerts. Registration fee does not include accommodation and transportation. If you wish, Organizers will help you to book an accommodation.

Organizer

Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Department of Musicology

Address: Westerplatte Street 10; 31-033 Kraków, Poland

http://www.muzykologia.uj.edu.pl

 

 

Musical Dialogues: 38th National Conference of the Musicological Society of Australia

Call for Papers

Musical Dialogues: 38th National Conference of the Musicological Society of Australia

Deadline: 1 April 2015

Conference Dates: 1-4 October 2015

Venue: Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, Australia

Website: http://music.sydney.edu.au/research/research-activities/musicological-society-australia-msa-conference-2015/

 

In 2015, the year of its centenary, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music is delighted to host the annual conference of the Musicological Society of Australia. The conference invites participants to consider how the idea of ‘dialogue’ is relevant to their musical research interests. Whether conceived of in terms of the relationship between a creator and her audience, between a work and its historical antecedents, between different music cultures, or between performance and research, the notion that art involves dialogue of some kind is commonplace. Indeed, in the globalised world in which we live, dialogue between different musical traditions, different traditions of thought and different methodological approaches actively works to reshape the ways in which we both create and understand music and has given rise to recent calls for relational musicology.

 

Plenary Speakers

We are pleased to announce that two of the plenary speakers are already confirmed. They are Gary Tomlinson (John Hay Whitney Professor of Music & the Humanities, Yale University), and Neal Peres Da Costa (Associate Professor, Historical Performance, Sydney Conservatorium of Music).

 

Conference Theme

The theme “Musical Dialogues” seeks to engage with and showcase a wide breadth of scholarly expertise. This might involve a consideration of the way dialogue takes place in musical collaborations, performer-composer interactions, or the critical and hermeneutic discourse that has sprung up around many types of music. Participants might also consider exploring dialogues across history (not forgetting that the present changes the past as much as the past influences the present) or how a composer, work, or practice can be understood as a response to past phenomena, be they musical, cultural or social. Other types of dialogue for consideration might be those that take place between different traditions that co-exist within the same geographical space: settler societies such as Australia have a rich heritage of such cross-cultural interactions.

 

We particularly welcome papers addressing the following topics, though these are only suggestions and should not constrain authors.

  • Australian music: intercultural and intra-cultural exchanges
  • Performance as dialogue (with the composer/work/audience)
  • Temporal intersections: music of the past in the present; new musics in the context of their pasts
  • Global musical dialogues
  • Musical institutions as they engage with their social contexts
  • Discourses in music theory and historiography
  • Popular music as social discourse
  • Jazz scenes, communities and practices
  • Sound and image: dialogues between music and the visual – iconography, film, gaming

Free papers are also welcome.

 

Guidelines for Applicants

Scholars are invited to submit 250-word abstracts for individual presentations related to the conference sub-topics listed above or in the category of “free paper” to the following email address kathleen.nelson@sydney.edu.au. All submissions must be received by 1 April 2015 and will be acknowledged with a receipt to sender. The conference format will provide each successful applicant with 20-minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for Q&A. Applicants will be informed of acceptance by 29 April 2015.

 

The planning committee will also accept proposals for panel sessions related to the conference theme. Proposals for panel sessions should be 250-words in length, include a full list of panel members and be submitted as per the guidelines outlined above.

 

Special Events

A variety of performances will be held during the conference. A highlight will be a new Noh (shinsaku Nô) play in English by Allan Marett to be presented by members of The Oppenheimer Noh Project during the conference. Entitled “Oppenheimer,” the play focuses on the development and use of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945. Conference registrants will be offered tickets to this event at a specially discounted price.

 

Planning Committee

Linda Barwick, Christopher Coady, David Larkin, Alan Maddox and Kathleen Nelson

 

For further information please contact Christopher Coady (christopher.coady@sydney.edu.au) or Kathleen Nelson (kathleen.nelson@sydney.edu.au).