Music, Cinema, and Modernism. The Works and Heritage of Kurt Weill between Europe and America

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and the DAMS/Università di Torino are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Music, Cinema, and Modernism. The Works and Heritage of Kurt Weill between Europe and America», to be held at the  Università degli studi di Torino, Palazzo Nuovo, Via Sant’Ottavio, 20 – Torino, from 22 to 24 May 2020.

Keynote Speakers

  • Nils Grosch (Universität Salzburg)
  • Stephen Hinton (Stanford University)

The conference aims to address aspects of Kurt Weill’s works in relation to his contemporaries and his heritage to succeeding generations, both in the United States and in Europe. The creative activities of the German-American composer have been characterized by his keen interest in new media: principally, in radio in Germany and in the cinema in the United States, and in new forms of experimentation in musical theater on both sides of the Atlantic.

The fact that his compositions as well as his sensibilities tended to situate themselves somewhere between the poles of highbrow and the lowbrow culture allows for multiple interpretations, while prompting various possible themes for research. The themes suggested here are not intended to be restrictive but, rather, to invite a wide range of reflections, and other topics are also welcome:

  • The modernity of Kurt Weill: borrowings and assimilations among his contemporaries
  • After 1950: the theoretical and aesthetic legacy of Kurt Weill after his death
  • Kurt Weill’s german-american contemporaries: aesthetic, artistic, and compositional choices
  • Marc Blitzstein as a translator and interpreter of the German Weill in the United States
  • Love Life on Broadway: a new musical theater genre is born?
  • Musicals, American opera, Radio Opera and so on: the ideas about musical theater by Kurt Weill
  • The debates for and against modernism among German émigré composers to the United States  before and after World War II
  • Aesthetic and theoretical debates concerning film music between the 1920s and 1940s
  • Film music as “modern music”: identity and perspectives
  • Kurt Weill and Hollywood: New Music for the Cinema?
  • Composer and arranger: new roles and new relationships
  • Berlin, Broadway, and Hollywood: a comparison of their modes of organization and cultural production

Programme Committee

  • Giaime Alonge (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Giulia Carluccio (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Tim Carter (University of North Carolina)
  • Pietro Cavallotti (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca)
  • Kim Kowalke (Eastman School of Music/ University of Rochester – The Kurt Weill Foundation for Music)
  • Andrea Malvano (Università degli studi di Torino)
  • Ilario Meandri (università degli studi di Torino)
  • Marida Rizzuti (Università IULM, Milano)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 16 February 2020*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of February 2020, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

RMA Study Day: Music, Media and Technologies

Royal Musical Association Study Day
20 May 2017, Durham University, UK

Keynote speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)

View the full programme and registration form. All are welcome to attend:

For more information please contact Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk

Papers:

Daniel Gouly – The affordances of digital music tools in theory and practice

Alex Stevenson (Leeds Beckett University) – Digital aesthetics in contemporary popular music performance

Bridget Coulter (University of Sheffield) – Authenticity and auto-tune: technology and the construction of vocal ‘naturalness’ in popular music

Nigel Martin (University of Derby) – Interpreting recontextualised guitar in contemporary popular music practice

Danielle Beverly (Northwestern University in Qatar) – Analog artifacts in the Middle East: music, memory, materiality, movement

Stephen Wilford (City, University of London) – “This is just a band”: music, representation and digital technologies in the Middle East and North Africa

Safa Canalp (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) – Towards a notion of subcultural transfer: circulation of media, and hierarchies of knowledge, taste and behavior

Tat Amaro (Durham University) – Shaping the past, surviving the future: computer karaoke in contemporary piphat music-making in Phayao province, northern Thailand

Karlyn King (University of Birmingham) – Vinyl records vs digital ephemera: does the medium of music matter?

Anne-Marie Beaumont & Aglaia Foteinou (University of Wolverhampton) – Back to the future: auralization and its application in musical analysis

Elizabeth Hunt (University of Liverpool) – Video games live and the gamification of the symphony orchestra

Kate Mancey (University of Liverpool) – The hidden soundtrack: music making in Rez Infinite


[original CFP follows]

Music, Media and Technologies

RMA Study Day, Durham University, UK
Saturday 20 May 2017

Keynote Speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)
Call for Papers deadline: 3 March 2017

How do media and technology shape music-making, music experience, and music meaning? What contemporary and historical developments in these fields influence how music (of any kind) can be understood? How has music played a role in shaping wider media and technology environments?

This study day aims to attract scholars from across music’s sub-disciplines interested in analysing the significance of media and technologies in the production, dissemination and experience of music.

Research areas might include (but are not limited to) both contemporary and historical approaches to musicology, analysis, ethnomusicology, music technology, psychology, education, composition and performance. There are no restrictions on musical genres, eras, or research approaches.

Contributions from postgraduate students and Early Career Researchers are especially welcome.

The study day will be free for Royal Musical Association (RMA) and Durham University Music Department members. There will be a fee of £10 for non-members.

All papers will be of 20-minutes duration. Please send abstracts of up to 300 words.

For enquiries or to submit an abstract, please email Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk.
Deadline for receipt of abstracts: Friday 3 March 2017.

The following themes are of particular interest:

Media and technologies in music production:
– Musical instruments and creative tools
– Wider technologies around creation and live music-making
– Recording and the studio

The influences of technologies at the moments of inspiration, creation and live performance in music of any kind. These may be central to the production of sound (musical instruments, creative tools) or have a less direct impact (technologies bringing together musicians and listeners, technologies of the physical or media spaces for music-making). These themes might be approached from analytical, historical or social perspectives, as well as those of creative practice.

Media and technologies in music dissemination:
– Film, broadcast, and music industries
– New media (historical or contemporary perspectives)
– Media of music learning

The roles of media and technologies in how music is spread and encountered. Focuses may include the impacts of commercialisation and the proliferation of new media (from both historical and contemporary perspectives) upon the processes and products involved in learning and sharing music. They might be explored through analysis of both musical texts and wider social contexts.

Media and technologies in music experience:
– Technologies of listening and music’s integration into everyday life
– Issues of genre, transnationalism and cultural hybridity
– Impacts upon identities, politics and communities

The effects of media and technologies in music’s broader involvements and uses. Focus here may fall on audiences, listeners, amateurs and communal music-makers, for whom music is integrated into wider life through media and technologies. Suggested areas of exploration include impacts upon global music flows, and the shaping of communal and individual experiences with music.

2013 International Computer Music Conference

Tura New Music in association with The International Computer Music Association, Edith Cowan University and The Australasian Computer Music Association announces

The 2013 International Computer Music Conference

2013 
 ICMC | IDEA
International Developments in ElectroAcoustics

12 – 16 August 2013

Perth, Western Australia

Keynotes include Agostino Di Scipio (Italy) and Alvin Curran (USA).

For 2013 ICMC also incorporates the regional Australasian Computer Music Conference and runs parallel to the 11th Totally Huge New Music Festival, Perth, Western Australia

Timeline:

10.12.12 Initial Call for Papers and Works

10.1.13 Full Call and Open for Submissions

10.2.13 Submission Deadline

10.2.13 Registrations Open

10.4.13 Papers and Works Confirmed

Initial Call

There are eight ways to submit to ICMC 2013

– short paper
– long paper
– poster
– demonstration
– studio report
– creative work
– piece and paper
– round table proposal

The conference theme for 2013 is IDEA – International Developments in ElectroAcoustics. We encourage the submission of papers examining any topic related to computer music and digital audio, including: aesthetic, compositional, educational, musicological, perceptual, scientific and technical aspects. Only completed papers and creative works will be considered.

Bearing in mind the conference theme, there are several streams for creative works. These may include, but are not limited to;

• solo instrument + electronics

• small and large ensemble + electronics

• laptop

• live coding

• video and music

• acousmatic music

• new interfaces for musical expression

• inter-media performance

• laptop ensemble

• computer-aided acoustic composition

• installation

• spatial music

• networked performance

Resources

There are some specific instrumental configurations available at the conference and recommended for creative work applications.

• Decibel fl/afl/bfl, clar/bclar/ssax/asax/tsax, percussion, piano, violin/viola, cello, electronics

• Clocked Out prepared piano, percussion and electronics.

• Vanessa Tomlinson solo percussion

• Mark Gasser piano and electronics

• Didgeridoo and electronics

• Mace Francis Orchestra – jazz big band and electronics [4 sax, 3 tpr/flugel horn, 3 trombone, guitar, electric bass, drum kit]

• 14.2 spatial configuration

• Western Australian Laptop Orchestra [up to 20 laptops, students at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts at Edith Cowan University and The School of Music, The University of Western Australia]

Submissions:

Paper – completed paper using the ICMC2013 Paper Template (Word), to a maximum of 8 pages.

Poster – applicants must provide a PDF on application, and provide an A0 print for the conference.

Piece and Paper – a completed paper using the ICMC2013 Paper Template (Word), to a maximum of 4 pages, that relates to the creative work that follows the guidelines below, submitted together.

Creative Work – no longer than 15 minutes long, all programming/electronics provided as a ZIP file with original score as PDF or video file, and a recording if this is available. Please note any specific software required to perform your piece that you will not be bringing with you. Acousmatic/spatial works must submit a stereo .aiff file.

Roundtable – a group of conversants no larger than 7 or smaller than 3, no longer than 20 minutes. All members must register and attend the conference.

All accepted papers and works require registration at the conference.

A new conference website will be online early January to accept submissions from 10.1.13. Stay up to date at www.icmc2013.com.au