Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century

International Conference.  Corfu, Greece, 17-19 November 2017

2017 marks for opera in Greece four anniversaries: the centenary since the passing of Spiros Samaras (1861-1917), the bicentenary since the birth of two important Greek opera composers, Spiridon Xyndas (1817-1896) and Domenikos Padovas (1817-1892), as well as the 150 years since the premiere of the opera O ypopsifios [The Parliamentary Candidate] (1867, music by Xyndas and libretto by Ioannis Rinopoulos), which was both the first full-scale opera in Greek and the pivotal point for the emergence of opera in Greek language.

The Hellenic Music Research Lab of the Music Department of the Ionian University and Corfu Philharmonic Society on the occasion of the aforementioned anniversaries organize the international conference entitled Opera and the Greek World during Nineteenth Century, which is going to take place in Corfu, Greece, on 17, 18 and 19 November 2017.

Corfu, the seat of the Ionian University, was the birthplace of the three aforementioned composers. The San Giacomo theatre of Corfu, the earliest theatrical stage of the region, hosted opera performances already since 1733, contributing decisively to the dissemination of opera within the Greek world during 19th century. Moreover, Xyndas, Padovas and Samaras presented in the same theatre their operas. Xyndas in 1840 was also one of the initial founders and professors of the Corfu Philharmonic Society and he dedicated to it certain of his operas. Padovas also taught harmony and music theory in the Philharmonic, in 1857 he dedicated to it his opera Dirce and since 1884 he was appointed the Society’s artistic director. Samaras, a student of Xyndas during his early music training, had multiple connections with the Philharmonic Society and had been its honorary artistic director since 1889.

Given the above, the conference will not be confined solely to the lives and the works of the aforementioned composers, but it will focus on matters regarding the place, the reception, the importance and the formative factors of the operatic activity within the Greek world during the “long nineteenth century”. With these in mind, some indicative themes of the conference are proposed to be;

  • Spiros Samaras: life and work
  • Spiridon Xindas: life and work
  • Domenikos Padovas: life and work
  • The activities of the Italian opera troupes in the Greek areas (singers, musicians, impresarios, repertory etc)
  • The activities of the French opera troupes in the Greek areas
  • The activities of the Greek opera troupes
  • Opera in the Greek communities of Diaspora (Trieste, Odessa, Alexandria, Smyrna, Constantinople etc)
  • Opera in the Greek urban centres
  • Institutions of operatic activity
  • The reception of opera in the Greek world
  • Subjects related to Greece in the 19th-century opera

The official languages of the opera are GreekItalian and English.

Scholars and researchers interested to participate in the conference are asked to submit their abstracts (250 words) and short biographical notes (100 words) for papers of no more than 20 minutes. Themed sessions of 60 minutes can also be proposed (Abstract of 450 words and Bios of 100 words).

There are no fees for the participation or the attendance of the conference.

The final date for the proposals’ submission is 31 December 2016.

The abstracts and the biographical notes should be sent until the above date in the following email: operaconfcorfu2017@gmail.com
The Official website of the conference is: http://users.ionio.gr/~GreekMus/operaconf2017/eng.htm
The conference’s programme will be finalized by 1 March 2017.

Programme Committee
Prof. Haris Xanthoudakis
Prof. Anastasia Siopsi
A. Prof. Panos Vlagopoulos
A. Professor Avra Xapapadakou

Organizing Committee
Spiridon Padovas
Kostas Kardamis
Kostas Sambanis
Stella Kourbana
Alexandros Charkiolakis
Gerasimos Martinis

VIRTUAL WORKS – ACTUAL THINGS

International Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016
4-6 April 2016, Orpheus Institute Ghent, BE
The Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016 will focus on the relation between the virtual multiplicities that enable an imaginary perception of musical works and the actual, concrete materials and practices that make such imaginary constructions possible. With the contribution of a most distinguished faculty, the event will give room for discussion on recent developments that are challenging the debate around the work-concept (Lydia Goehr), the question of the autonomy of music (Gunnar Hindrichs), the canonical tendency of past musical pieces (Andreas Dorschel), new ontologies (David Davies), the potentialities emerging from editorial and performative practices (John Rink), and a new image of work inspired by the notion of multiplicity and pointing towards a domain specific assemblage theory (Paulo de Assis, convenor).image Academy2016.jpg
In our globalized and hyper-mediatized culture, musical works are currently determined by Western consumers and profit-oriented professional performers rather than by transhistorical creative and productive processes. A renewed gaze upon the innumerable things that actually enable the here-and-now appearance of musical works (drafts, sketches, manuscripts, editions, recordings, comments, instruments, analysis, etc.) opens up wider horizons for reflection and, crucially, for future practices.

Faculty

With the contribution of a most distinguished faculty, the Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory 2016 will discuss recent developments that are challenging the debate around the work-concept (Goehr), the question of the autonomy of music (Hindrichs), the canonical tendency of past musical pieces (Dorschel), new ontologies (Davies), the potentialities emerging from editorial and performative practices (Rink), and a new image of work inspired by the notion of multiplicity and pointing towards
a domain specific assemblage theory (Assis).

  • Lydia Goehr, Columbia University, New York, US
  • David Davies, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Andreas Dorschel, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz (KUG), Graz, Austria
  • Gunnar Hindrichs, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
  • John Rink, St John’s College, Cambridge, UK

Academy convenor

Paulo de Assis

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

Gesellschaft für Tanzforschung · GTF Annual Conference 2016 · Call for papers

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

November 18–20, 2016 · Orff-Institute of the University Mozarteum/Salzburg

The term TRACES has been positioned very intentionally between the two central artistic means of expression SOUNDS and MOVES, as interface so to speak, since sounds as well as bodily movements can both be regarded as traces due to their volatility in space and time. They can enter into a dialog with other artistic traces (of movement), such as the grand brushstroke of a painter, the fine drawings of a graphic artist or the light projections of a digital installation, in order to access further dimensions of space and time for the hearing and seeing of movement dynamics. Against this backdrop, an (in the best sense) endlessly creative process gathers momentum, in which audible and/or visible movement traces are permanently recreated, without ever getting clearly defined contours nor even taking a definite shape.

What kinds of artistic options are possible due to such interactions between sound- and movement traces, either in the form of a performance or an event? And what kinds of challenges result from this for the spectators/listeners – particularly if these interactions primarily unfold within the area of the non-verbal, beyond the obvious allocations of meaning or outstanding narrative threads? This conference will discuss perspectives based on (rehearsal) processes and production aesthetics as well as questions relating to the perception of the interplay of analogue/digital, instrumental/ vocal and musical or noise-like sounds with virtual or real body movements in choreographies, improvisations and dance performances: The objective is to ‘trace’ audio-visual movement traces and the resulting network of sensory impressions.

Deadline for proposals for lectures, workshops, poster presentations, lecture demonstrations, performances and labs (please give the preferred format) is May 1.

Please send the respective proposal with a maximum of 250 words and a short biography of 100 words at most to Stephanie Schroedter: st.schroedter@t-online.de

You will be informed about the programme selection by June 1, 2016 at the latest.
For more information look at: http://www.gtf-tanzforschung.de

Performing Knowledge Conference

25-26 April 2016

Emmanuel College, Cambridge

Call for Papers

Bringing together performing musicians engaging in practice-led research, ethnographers of Western art music, and psychologists specialising in tacit knowledge research, this two-day conference will explore performers’ interpretative processes and their uses of tacit knowledge (also called implicit, procedural, or embodied knowledge) in understanding the explicit knowledge presented in historical documents, analyses, and performance treatises.

Keynote participants include Professor Tom Beghin (fortepianist), Margaret Faultless (violinist), Professor Christopher Page (guitarist), Chris Maene (instrument builder), Professor Tina K. Ramnarine (musician and anthropologist), Dr Satinder Gill (experimental psychologist), and Professor John Rink (Director, Cambridge Centre for Musical Performance Studies).

Belgian-Canadian fortepianist Tom Beghin (Orpheus Institute/McGill University) will perform a keynote recital featuring Beethoven’s last three piano sonatas, to be presented on a replica of Beethoven’s Broadwood piano built by master instrument builder Chris Maene.

Margaret Faultless (Cambridge University/RAM) will present an open rehearsal discussing interpretative decision-making processes within conductor-less orchestras. Her presentation will be followed by a performance with the Cambridge University Collegium Musicum.

Keynote papers will be presented by:

  • Professor Christopher Page: Performance, Imagination and the Early-Romantic Guitar
  • Professor Tina K. Ramnarine: Performance, Storytelling and the Politics of Musical Knowledge
  • Dr Satinder Gill: Knowing-How and Knowing-When: researching performers’ musical timing

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers, 30-minute lecture-recitals (each will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion), and posters. The conference language is English. Presentations that engage critically with theories and methodologies of researching performers’ tacit knowledge, such as the use of ethnographic techniques, practice-led research, or the analysis of recorded audio and audio-visual performance, are especially welcome. Interdisciplinary perspectives are also invited, for example, papers that draw on opera or dance studies, material studies, or cognitive studies in music in discussing the theme of the conference. Topics may include:

  • Performers’ creative engagement with historical documents and objects, extending beyond the conventional remit of historically-informed performance practice studies.
  • The influence of instrument affordances on performers’ interpretative choices.
  • How musicians communicate through gesture and/or vocalisation.
  • The challenges and potentials of self-reflexive research in performance.
  • The influence of tradition on performers’ interpretative ideas.
  • The dynamics of performers’ interpretative decision-making processes in practice, rehearsals, and/or public performance (both solo and in ensemble).

Please submit proposals by Friday, 5 February 2016 including:

  • Name and institutional affiliation (if applicable).
  • Curriculum Vitae and 100-word biography.
  • Title and abstract of presentation, max. 450 words. For lecture-recitals, please include programme details of any repertoire to be performed (details are excluded from the word count).
  • A list of technical requirements (computer projection and a Steinway grand piano will be available).

Proposals will be assessed by the conference committee and applicants will be notified of the outcome by 15 February. The registration fee for delegates (whether presenting or observing) will be £90 (full) and £50 (students). Early-bird registration (by 19 February) and RMA member rates are £80 (full) and £40 (students). Registration fee includes all concerts, meals (excluding breakfast), and refreshments. Additional tickets (if required) for Tom Beghin’s recital may be booked through ADC Ticketing for £25 / £15.

Proposals should be emailed to performingknowledge@emma.cam.ac.uk. Please send any enquires to this address also.

Web Page: https://www.emma.cam.ac.uk/conferences/events/perfknow/

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/647358332072144/

Choral practice, performance and pedagogy: real world applications of choral research

CALL FOR PAPERS

Department of Music, The University of Sheffield, in partnership with the Institute of Musical Research.

Friday 8th April 2016.

This one-day, interactive choral conference is being convened in the Department of Music at the University of Sheffield, with funding from The Institute of Musical Research. The aim of the event is to provide a forum for researchers to present their work on choral practice, performance and pedagogy. This conference is designed to provide opportunities for demonstrating the impact of current research in a way which emphasizes practical applications alongside pedagogical approaches to choral rehearsal and performance.

Submissions are invited for sessions with a strong participatory element, and potential for a high level of audience engagement. Proposals from Early Career Researchers are particularly encouraged (see below for details of a limited number of travel bursaries which may be awarded to  eligible ECRs).

Sessions may take the form of practical demonstrations, masterclasses, performances or workshops (45 minutes maximum), which are related to the presenter’s original research, or which interrogate choral concepts and philosophies derived from the researcher’s review of the literature. Subjects may include:

  • Choral leadership and conductor training
  • Group dynamics in the choral context
  • Choral learning processes and rehearsal strategies
  • Choral repertoire and performance practices
  • Choral inclusion and diversity
  • Topics related to community singing or community projects involving group singing activities

Shorter spoken papers (20 minutes, including 5 minutes for questions) are also invited, preferably including a practical, participatory or performance element. Subjects for round-table discussions or panels (30 minutes maximum) may also be suggested, with the aim of sharing knowledge, experience, research findings and potential applications among participants. Presentations, demonstrations and workshops may be related to research on group singing in any context, and to any type or size of choral ensemble. A repertoire exchange will be included in the programme, so delegates will be encouraged to bring a song or vocal warm up to share.

Bursaries for Early Career Researchers: There will be a limited number of travel bursaries, funded by the Institute of Musical Research, to assist ECRs to present their work at this conference. Applications for bursaries are encouraged from ECRs who are within three years of completing their PhD, and who do not hold an academic post which provides access to conference funding.

Bursary applications should include:

  • A note of the applicant’s PhD completion date
  • Confirmation that the applicant does not currently have access to funding for conference attendance
  • An accurate indication of the travel costs that will be involved in attending this conference
  • A short biography (c. 200 words)

Submissions: Please send abstracts (c. 300 words), along with applications for travel bursaries, to Dr Michael Bonshor: m.bonshor@sheffield.ac.uk.

The closing date for submissions and bursary applications is January 15th 2016. All proposals should include the name and email address of the presenter, institutional affiliation (if applicable), and details of any AV requirements for the session.

Arts Without Borders? Perspectives on Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in and through the Arts

 

Call for Papers

Arts Without Borders? Perspectives on Collaboration and Interdisciplinarity in and through the Arts

An international conference hosted by the University of the Arts Helsinki and CERADA (Center for Educational Research and Academic Development in the Arts), Finland

October 19-22, 2016

We are experiencing a renaissance in the power of the arts, even where political will is lacking. Artists increasingly make their own futures and work collaboratively across disciplines. Dimensions of creativity and innovation, empowered learning, distributed and ethical leadership, and entrepreneurship and activism, all of which are embedded within artistic practices, are being recognized as critical to contemporary societies in diverse ways. At the same time arts institutions in Higher Education, many of which have operated as small organizations focused on a single discipline, are starting to merge and to collaborate at interdisciplinary levels. This trend raises many questions about purpose and principles, and indeed in some contexts arts organisations are resisting pressures to merge, seeing these being driven by finance and bureaucracy, and perceiving a threat to their own core purpose and quality.

This international conference will explore the potential and challenges of interdisciplinarity, and the full scope of the performing and visual arts in discovering new territories and evolving beyond existing paradigms. Through the event we aim to set agendas and mobilize global networks, generating dialogue and exchange between researchers, arts practitioners, and professionals from a wide range of disciplines including education, psychology, health care, organizational management and leadership.

Conference themes

  • Collaborative processes, conflict and leadership: leveraging individual and collective expertise, empowering new knowledge and enabling the full potential of the arts
  • Improvisation, creativity and innovation: exploring tensions between traditional and contemporary practices, notated repertoire and making new work.
  • Connecting the arts beyond their own disciplines: new visions for breaking through professional silos and embracing diversity
  • Rethinking paradigms of purpose in the arts: dimensions of quality, entrepreneurship, impact and activism

Keynotes

Efva Lilja, choreographer http://www.efvalilja.se

Helen Marriage, director, Artichoke http://www.artichoke.uk.com

(The full list of keynotes will be announced at a later date).

We welcome the following categories of proposals related to the Conference themes

  1. Research papers & performance papers
  2. Practical workshops
  3. Symposia
  4. Individually tailored proposals

The deadline to submit an abstract proposal is January 11, 2016

All outcomes will be known by March 14, 2016

Proposals for papers will be peer reviewed and proposals for performances and workshops will be included on the basis of quality, engagement and relevance to the strands. Abstracts should be written in English, and should be around 400 words.

Conference Organising Committee            University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland

  • Professor Helena Gaunt Sibelius Academy
  • Patrick Furu Sibelius Academy
  • Professor Heidi Westerlund Sibelius Academy
  • Kai Lehikoinen Theatre Academy
  • Professor Riikka Stewen Academy of Fine Arts

(Full Peer Review Scientific Committee to be confirmed)

Please find the proposal guidelines on the Conference website and submit your abstract using the electronic form provided:

http://www.uniarts.fi/arts-without-borders

For further details please contact: Katja Thomson katja.thomson@uniarts.fi

 

 

 

 

Musical Cartographies

Musical Cartographies: The Harvard Graduate Music Forum Conference, 2016

29-30 January 2016

Harvard University Department of Music
Cambridge, MA

Keynote: Arun Saldanha (University of Minnesota)

Call for Proposals

This interdisciplinary conference investigates the relationship between music and the organization of space. Approaching the topic from the perspectives of both scholarly inquiry and creative practice, we will ask how music has been implicated in mappings of physical and conceptual spaces and how spatial mappings have functioned as ways of thinking about musical sound.

Topics for consideration include but are not limited to:

Geography, power, and identity:

  • How have historically and culturally contingent geographical formations conditioned music’s production, dissemination, and reception?
  • How does music intersect with geographically-mediated categories such as race, nation, and ecology?
  • How do issues of diaspora, migration, and stateless peoples complicate the relationships we draw between music and geography?

Representations of sound, time, and musical form:

  • How have music-theoretical models mapped domains such as pitch, timbre, and gesture?
  • How is map-and path- making implicated in music cognition and the phenomenology of listening, and how might models such as cognitive mapping shed light on these processes?
  • How might we think of musical notation and other visual representations of music as forms of cartography?

Practices and technologies:

  • How do scholars and creative practitioners draw and contest disciplinary, aesthetic and conceptual boundaries—for instance, between academic fields, between art forms, or between the “musical” or “extra-musical”?
  • How do composers, performers, and sound artists creatively organize the physical and conceptual spaces in which they work?
  • How have technologies been implicated in mapping musical spaces, and how have new media technologies altered the shape, nature, and limits of such spaces?

Submissions
We welcome submissions from current graduate students exploring these issues from the perspectives of both research and practice. We seek proposals on all repertoires, musical practices, and historical periods from a broad array of disciplinary and methodological perspectives.

Formats for presentation include:

  • 20-minute papers, audiovisual presentations, or exploratory text works, with 10 minutes for discussion
    Please submit abstracts of a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, up to 4 additional pages for figures. Please add a short statement regarding AV requirements.
  • 30-minute composers’ colloquia, performances, or lecture-recitals, with 15 minutes for discussion
    Please submit details of the work to be presented in a maximum of 350 words and, where appropriate, links to downloads (via Dropbox, WeTransfer, Google Drive etc.) of relevant sound recordings, scores, and/or supplementary documentation.

In addition to the above questions, composers and performers might consider:

  • What role does space play in your conceptualization of musical form? In your approach to musical performance?
  • What is mapped during composition or performance? This could include time, coincidence, relationships, physical space, and other parameters.
  • How do you relate in your work to geographical categories such as race, nation, and ecology? Likewise, how do you relate to conceptual boundaries such as those between genres, art forms, or historical periods?
  • How do your creative practices challenge existing ways of mapping musical sound?

Deadline for the proposal: 17 November 2015

Please send submissions to: harvardgmf2016@gmail.com

For more information, please visit: http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gmf2016/home

Fifth Annual Meeting of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) | The Compleat Keyboardist: harpsichord, fortepiano, organ, clavichord, continuo

FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE

HISTORICAL KEYBOARD SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA (HKSNA)

21-23 MARCH 2016

Oberlin College’s Conservatory of Music (Ohio, USA) will host the fifth annual meeting of the Historical Keyboard Society of North America (HKSNA) from Monday, 21 March, to Wednesday, 23 March 2016. The meeting’s theme “The Compleat Keyboardist: harpsichord, fortepiano, organ, clavichord, continuo” hopes to inspire us with the variety of instruments played by our forefathers and foremothers.

Three days of morning and afternoon events (Monday to Wednesday) will include papers, lecture-recitals, mini-recitals, and an exhibition of publications, recordings, and contemporary instrument makers’ work. Proposals for individual presentations or for themed sessions with multiple participants on any subject relating to historical keyboard instruments, their use and repertories from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century, are welcome.

*Of special note: Oberlin College will also host the Eighth Jurow International Harpsichord Competition during 22-24 March 2016. For more details, visit: http://historicalkeyboardsociety.org/2016-jurow-competition/.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Please submit proposals by electronic means only, via email to hksna2016@gmail.com by 30 September 2015. Individual presentations will be limited to 25 minutes. For papers and themed sessions, submit a one-page abstract attached to the e-mail as a Microsoft Word document. For mini-recitals and lecture-recitals, submit complete program information and a representative recording as an internet link or as an attached MP3 file. For performers not intending to bring their own instruments or to make arrangements to use exhibitors’ instruments, instruments will be available, based on needs for the Jurow harpsichord competition; see list below. All proposals must include short biographical statements (250 words or less) for all presenters and indicate any audio-visual/media needs.

Notification of accepted proposals will be made by 31 October 2015. Presenters must be members of HKSNA and must register for the conference. Presenters must also cover their own travel and other expenses. Further information, as it becomes available, will be posted on the website of HKSNA (www.historicalkeyboardsociety.org).

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

David Breitman
Lisa Goode Crawford
Frances Conover Fitch
Joseph Gascho
Sonia Lee
Webb Wiggins, chair

*          *          *

Below is a list of Oberlin Conservatory’s Historical Performance Program keyboard instruments; not all may be available for use in your proposal due to use in the Jurow harpsichord competition or hall availability.

French Harpsichords
Richard Kingston double, 1990
Keith Hill double, 1987
John G. P. Leek double, 1975
William Dowd double, 1969
Willard Martin single, 1979

Flemish Harpsichords
Zuckermann double after Moermans, 2007
Robert Myerly single, 1989
Willard Martin single, 1979

German Harpsichords
John Phillips double after Gräbner, 2014
William Dowd double after Mietke, 1986 (Wiggins)

Italian Harpsichords
David Sutherland, 1983
Anderson Dupree, 1982
William Dowd, 1965 (A=415/440/463)

Virginals
Edward Kottick muselar (mother & child), 2004 (A=440)
Willard Martin muselar, 1973 (A=415)
potential Owen Daly Italian, 2016 (A=463)

Chamber Organs
Gerrit Klop chamber organ, 1985 (8’ 4’ 2 2/3’ 2’ flutes, 8’ wooden principal treble only)
Robert Byrd chamber organ, 1990’s (8’ 4’ 2’ flutes)
D. A. Flentrop chamber organ, 1956

Concert Organs
D. A. Flentrop three-manual North European organ in Warner Concert Hall, 1974
C. B. Fisk three-manual late-Romantic organ in Finney Chapel, Op. 116
John Brombaugh two-manual early 17th century meantone organ in Fairchild Chapel, 1981

Clavichords
Joel Speerstra pedal and two-manual clavichord, c. 2006
Gough unfretted 5-octave clavichord, c.1964
Zuckermann “King of Sweden” fretted 4-octave clavichord, 2009

Early Pianos
Thomas & Barbara Wolf after Dulcken, Viennese, 5-octave + 2 notes (FF-g’’’), c. 1990’s
Paul McNulty after Walter, Viennese, 5-octave + 2 notes (FF-g’’’), c. 2005
Anton Zierer fortepiano, Viennese, 6 ½-octave (CC-g’’’’), c. 1829
Broadwood parlor grand piano #5418, 7-octave (85 notes), c. 1865

 

(Per)Forming Art: Performance as Research in Contemporary Artworks

20 Sep 15

University of Leeds

The acts of composing and performing are central processes to the formation of a musical work. Performance is a medium through which music is formed. It is a significant part of a work’s compositional process and, as such, forms a symbiotic relationship with the act of composing. An iterative cycle between performance and composition comes about when the composer performs their own work and/or composes through performance. Performance in this manner can be seen as a form of practice-based research that can guide the compositional process.

This RMA conference focuses on performance as a type of compositional technique and as a mode of practice-based research for the act of composing a work. Primarily engaging with music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, ‘(Per)Forming Art’ invites proposals for a series of lecture-recitals by composers to demonstrate their research through performance. Such disciplines include, but are not limited to, acoustic composition, electronic composition, composing with improvisation, live coding. Presenters and delegates will have the opportunity to meet other researchers, performers, and composers as well as learn about a variety of approaches, techniques, and processes relevant to the formation of an artwork.

Proposals are invited for forty-minute lecture-recital slots (thirty minutes for presenting and performing followed by ten minutes for questions and answers). Composers may perform their own works or invite performers to accompany them (performers will not be provided by the conference).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Performance as practice-based research of compositional techniques in general
  • Performance as an actual technique for composing music
  • How performing other works can inform the compositional process of one’s own work and/or how one engages with performance as a compositional technique
  • How engaging with other performers performing other works can inform the compositional process of one’s own artwork.
  • Live coding and its influence on compositional practice
  • Improvisation and its influence on compositional practice
  • Performance as a unifying medium between separate artistic disciplines within interdisciplinary artworks
  • Performance as a technique for composing a work vs performing a ‘finished’ composed work

Presenters will also be asked to perform in the conference concert on the evening of the conference. The artwork(s) they perform should be related to (if not the same as) their lecture-recital topic. Proposed lecture-recitals should be emailed as abstracts (of up to 500 words, and with titles) to the (Per)Forming Art Symposium (performingartsymposium@gmail.com) no later than Monday 6th July, 2015.

Lecture-recital proposals should include the following details: name, institutional affiliation (if any), email address, any special requests such as AV requirements.

Further information can be found here.

Analysis – Interpretation – Performance

A Contact Zone for the Reconsideration of Musicological Methods

Annual Conference of the Austrian Society for Musicology (ÖGMW) 2015

University of Music and Performing Arts Graz (KUG)
November 18–21, 2015

Programme Committee:
Christian Utz (chair); Klaus Aringer, Christa Brüstle, Federico Celestini, Martin Eybl, Werner Goebl, Gerd Grupe

Call for Papers [download]

Processes of musical performance are increasingly the focus of musicological attention. The discourse on the relevance of an aural interpretation for a contemporary understanding of music from the past was triggered by the trend towards historically-informed performance practice that developed from the 1960s onwards. Further “performative turns” in aesthetics, literature and theatre studies did not, however, bring about major repercussions in musicology until the 1990s. Together with an enhanced interest in the history of reception and performance, these developments finally contributed to an understanding of musical works not solely as objects of contemplation but also as frameworks for a “performance culture”. Parallel developments in technology enabled recordings to be used broadly as fundamental research material, often in performance-oriented corpus studies.

Nevertheless, the question of the position of musical analysis, as a traditional musicological tool, in the face of this methodological integration of performance and sound remains unresolved. Conventional approaches that considered musical analyses to be “guidelines” for performance have been decidedly refuted since the 1990s, culminating in Carolyn Abbate’s categorical separation of “drastic” musical experiences through live performances and “gnostic” interpretations based on established musicology and analysis. Recently, a more differentiated approach to this field of tension has emerged, paradigmatically represented in Nicholas Cook’s extensive concept of “music as performance”. Increasingly, the term “performance” is understood to encompass not only live situations but also various forms of medially-documented performances.

How can intuitive knowledge applied and gained in performances (as documented in “arts-based research”, for instance) and analytically-substantiated musicological insights synergize fruitfully? This question may be approached from diverse research traditions: along with the studies on reception and performance history that have been carried out over the course of several decades, the historical and systematic methods of British Performance Studies (including the research projects CHARM 2004–2009 and CMPCP 2009–2014), empirical research e.g. in Performance Science (international symposia/ISPS since 2007), and performance-oriented analytical methods, the rediscovery of structural analysis in ethnomusicology (in the journal Analytical Approaches to World Music, among others) has also shed new light on the field of performance, which had always been of central importance to that discipline.

Abstracts submitted for the annual conference of the Austrian Society for Musicology 2015 may thus feature any area of musicology and should address current research on the relationship between analysis, interpretation and performance as a challenge for reconsidering musicological methods.

Section 1: The Presence of Historical Sound
Section 2: Listening to the Twentieth Century: Musical Performance in the Era of Analysis
Section 3: Analyzing Interpretations and Interpreting Analyses
Section 4: Performance and Analysis in Non-Western Musical Genres
Section 5: Performance, Analysis and Empirical Research Methods

Keynotes:
Kai Köpp (Bern University of the Arts)
Joshua Rifkin (Boston University)
John Rink (University of Cambridge)
Renee Timmers (University of Sheffield)
Sarah Weiss (Yale University / YaleNUSCollege Singapore)

Abstracts for papers (up to 500 words) and poster presentations (up to 300 words) may be submitted by e-mail to oegmw2015(at)kug.ac.at until May 31, 2015. The abstracts will be reviewed anonymously by a jury. Notification of papers accepted will be made by July 15, 2015.

www.kug.ac.at/performance-analysis