Reframing the Golden Age Musical: Methods, Sources, Performance

The forth Biennial StageStruck! Conference
An international conference in honor of Prof. Kim Kowalke, President of the Kurt Weill Foundation.
Convenor: Professor Dominic McHugh, University of Sheffield

The Great American Songbook Foundation at The Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel, IN
12 – 14th May 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS – 1 JULY 2020
See below for more information.

Abstract:

Traditional histories of the American musical tend to revolve around the formation of a canon of Broadway shows written roughly between the 1940s and mid-1960s, with Oklahoma! (1943) and Fiddler on the Roof (1964) often cited as terminal works. Other key works during the period include Kiss Me, Kate (1948), Guys and Dolls (1950), My Fair Lady (1956) and West Side Story (1957). The era encompasses the ends of the careers of figures from the previous generation such as Cole Porter, Irving Berlin and Kurt Weill, the peak of the output of Rodgers and Hammerstein and Lerner and Loewe, and the beginning of the creative influence of Stephen Sondheim and Bock and Harnick.

Yet to what extent is the concept of the Golden Age a useful tool for framing musicals, and how can we better understand these ever-present yet curiously elusive works?

In a conference honoring the career of Kim Kowalke (Professor, Rochester, NY; President of the Kurt Weill Foundation), and marking the seventieth anniversary of the death of Kurt Weill, we take stock of existing scholarship on the Golden Age musical and explore ways forward.

The conference also affords the opportunity to celebrate the richness of the Great American Songbook Foundation’s collections on the musical.

The conference will include a keynote from Kara Gardner, author of Agnes de Mille: Telling Stories in Broadway Dance.

Possible lines of enquiry might include:

  • What is the nature of the Golden Age musical?
  • What are the best tools, approaches and methodologies for analysing and examining the Golden Age musical?
  • When did it start to be conceived of as the Golden Age?
  • What are the benefits and pitfalls of the term?
  • What are the major archival holdings on Golden Age musicals?
  • How can we access the Golden Age musical, especially in the case of works that were not filmed and/or recorded?
  • What was the relationship between Broadway and Hollywood during the Golden Age?
  • How can we strengthen relationships between scholars of different disciplines (e.g. musicology and film studies) and between scholars and performers?
  • What impacts, if any, did the Broadway musical have beyond New York (and beyond America) during the Golden Age?
  • How can we avoid the pull of nostalgia in framing the Golden Age musical

Lodging:

Area hotels and group rate information coming soon.

Attendees are responsible for travel & lodging.

Call for Papers:

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes of discussion) or for a 90-minute panel (three papers + discussion) should be emailed to Dominic McHugh at d.mchugh@sheffield.ac.uk by 1 July 2020.

Learn about the Great American Songbook Foundation:

The conference will include a showcase of the Great American Songbook Foundation’s holdings on musical theatre, which include the papers of Meredith Willson and Gus Kahn.

Previous Stagestruck! Conferences have been held at the University of Sheffield (2014, 2016) and at the Great American Songbook Foundation (2018).


4th Transnational Opera Studies Conference

Bayreuth, June 24–26, 2021
Founded in Bologna in 2015, tosc@ is a biennial meeting designed to give scholars, artists and opera lovers from different countries the opportunity to come together. The name of the conference is an acronym:

                            Transnational

                            O pera

                            S tudies

                            C onference

                                        @                   with the final word referring to the host city.

Open to all approaches, forms, genres and periods, the tosc@ conference aims to unite the excellence and boldness of contemporary research on opera and musical theatre in general. The conference moves from place to place, encouraging the presence of contributors from the host countries, enlarging the circle of its participants and promoting encounters between cultures and sensibilities. In this way it hopes to foster interest in opera studies in the younger generation of researchers, be they musicologists or scholars from other disciplines. Papers may be given in the language(s) of the host country or in English. Everyone is invited to take part, regardless of their professional status.

tosc@bayreuth.2021

Following the success of the first three meetings (tosc@bologna.2015, tosc@bern.2017 and tosc@paris.2019), the fourth edition of the tosc@ conference will take place at the University of Bayreuth, Germany, from June 24–26, 2021. Since 1976 the University has hosted a unique Research Institute for Music Theatre, located in the nearby Castle of Thurnau. With the Richard Wagner Festspielhaus and the Margravial Opera House the city of Bayreuth is filled with operatic history and culture, which can be explored by all participants in the diverse organized activities accompanying the conference.

The Programme Committee consists of:

Luisa Cymbron (Universidade NOVA de Lisboa),

Nils Grosch (Universität Salzburg),

Kordula Knaus (Universität Bayreuth),

Gundula Kreuzer (Yale University),

Raphaëlle Legrand (Université Paris-Sorbonne),

Isabelle Moindrot (Université Paris 8),

Anno Mungen (Universität Bayreuth)

and Benjamin Walton (University of Cambridge).

Kordula Knaus and Anno Mungen are also the conference organizers.

The Programme Committee welcomes proposals in the following formats:

individual papers (20 minutes long, with 10 minutes for discussion);

themed sessions (three or four papers, each 20 minutes long with 10 minutes for discussion – please note that the Committee reserves the right to accept one or several proposals on a separate basis even if the entire panel is not selected);

roundtable sessions (90 minutes long, up to six people each giving a brief position paper, followed by a general discussion).

We invite submissions on any subject related to opera and other forms of musical and music theatre. Presentations which integrate performative aspects, or other alternative formats, are welcome. Methodologies may be varied, traversing disciplines and perspectives: verbal text, music, drama, performance, body, voice, interpretation, declamation, painting, scenography, dance, staging, stage technology, cinema, photography, video, television, radio, digital arts, as well as reception, historiography, economics, ecology, opera and society, opera and the media, opera and the other arts, etc.

Reflecting the special research interests of the University of Bayreuth with its Research Institute for Music Theatre and the ‘Africa Multiple’ cluster of Excellence, proposals focusing on performance research and practices as well as proposals focusing on perspectives of racially or culturally ‘othered’ operatic phenomena are encouraged. Furthermore, proposals that engage with questions of opera at the periphery of the traditional Western operatic culture and opera in a globalized world, as well as transnational perspectives, will be of particular interest to the committee. Preference will be given to proposals that explore questions and problematics, rather than simply offering descriptive accounts.

Proposals may be submitted in English, French, German or Italian. They must include the following:

– author’s full name, – country and institution, – e-mail address, – paper title, – abstract.

Abstracts should be prepared as follows:

– individual papers: maximum 350 words;

– themed sessions: a 250-word summary outlining the aims of the session and a 350-word abstract for each paper;

– roundtable sessions: a 250-word summary outlining the aims of the session, and a brief description of each position paper.

Typically, an academic abstract should include a clear statement of the topic and research question(s), contextualized within existing knowledge; a summary of the argument, evidence and conclusions; and an explanation of why the topic and findings are important. Abstracts should thus include all necessary information that will allow the Programme Committee to evaluate the paper’s quality and originality and its potential as an oral presentation.

Proposals must be submitted as attachments by email as a Word file (“.doc” or “.docx” – not “.pdf”) to:

tosc@uni-bayreuth.de

by September 30, 2020

Everyone submitting a proposal will be sent a confirmation email; if you do not receive a notification within six days, please resend the proposal. All abstracts will be anonymized before being evaluated by the Programme Committee. Do not include any information in your abstract that could reveal your identity (such as ‘As I have shown in my earlier article…’).

All those who have submitted a proposal will be notified of the outcome by the beginning of January 2021. Following acceptance by the Programme Committee, there will be an opportunity to revise abstracts before their publication in the conference programme.

FEES

As for other events of this kind, participants (speakers and spectators) will be required to pay for themselves. The precise registration fee will depend on the number of participants, and will be confirmed when the notification of accepted papers is sent; it will, however, be no more than € 100 (€ 50 for students and scholars from the Global South), and will include three buffets. A special effort will be made for scholars from the Global South in order to provide travel grants. ​

THE tosc@bayreuth.2021 AWARD

The Programme Committee will offer an award for the best paper presented by a junior scholar at the conference. All those who started their doctoral research in 2010 or later and whose papers are accepted for the conference, will be eligible. Those who wish to be considered for this award must submit the final version of their paper to the Programme Committee (accompanied by any musical examples, images, etc.) to tosc@uni-bayreuth.de by May 20, 2021.

The tosc@bayreuth.2021 award will be awarded at the end of the event (June 26, 2021). The winner will be invited to submit the oral presentation as a full article for publication in a prominent international peer-reviewed journal, and will be invited to present a new paper at a plenary session of the fifth edition of tosc@.

CALENDAR

  • September 30, 2020: Deadline for the candidates’ submissions
  • Early January 2021: Announcement of the results
  • May 20, 2021: Deadline for submissions to the tosc@bayreuth.2021 award
  • May 20 – June 20, 2021: Evaluation of young researchers’ papers
  • June 24–26, 2021: tosc@bayreuth.2021

Click here to download the CfP.

Click here for more information on the conference homepage.

SONG STUDIES 2020 – Exploring Interdisciplinary Approaches to Songs and Practices of Singing (1200-today)

Ghent University, 1-3 July 2020

Deadline call for papers: 20 December 2019

Keynote speaker: Monique Scheer (Tübingen University)

The singing voice is a medium of expression that is found in all times and cultures. People have always been singing, not only to perform entertainingly, but also to express emotions or to embody identities. This has for example made collective singing (and listening) practices a primary way for people to articulate and embody the identities that are fundamental to the existence of social groups. The bodily and sensory experience of moving and sounding together in synchrony, enables individuals to experience feelings of togetherness with others.

Song is the versatile medium facilitating such processes. Songs can evoke and channel emotions, employing them for specific (or less specific) means. As a multimodal genre, song enables not only the articulation and embodiment of ideas; as an inherently oral and intangible medium, songs can move through space and time, transgressing any material form. Therefore, songs have proven an ideal tool for the distribution of news, contentious ideas, or mobilising messages.

This conference aims to bring together researchers from various disciplines investigating song (for example musicology, literary studies, history, sociology, performance studies, cognition studies, anthropology, etc.). The focus will be on the definition of possible approaches to the study of this medium (both in its material and performed existence), its performances (in any form) and reception (in any context). Research examples may cover songs written and sung in any culture and language, and any (historical) period. Common ground will be found through concepts, approaches and methodologies, encouraging an interdisciplinary and transhistorical dialogue, breaking ground for a new research field: song studies.

Possible research areas and questions to be explored are:

  • how to study the multimodality of the genre, acknowledging both textual and musical characteristics, and its performative nature;
  • the sensory/bodily and emotional/affective experience of listening and singing;
  • cognitive and/or affective processes of singing (and collective singing practices);
  • how to study the performative aspects of songs in historical contexts;
  • the ‘power’/agency of song;
  • the role of song and singing in social processes and historical developments; etc. We invite proposals for 20-minute individual papers (max. 300 words) or alternative formats (pre- submission inquiry is encouraged). As the aim of this conference is to facilitate dialogue, there will be ample time for discussion and exchange. Please send your proposal, including your name, academic affiliation and a short biographical note, no later than 20 December 2019 to renee.vulto@ugent.be. For more information and registration, see www.songstudies.ugent.be.

International Conference Rethinking The Three Cornered- Hat a century after

International Conference
Rethinking The Three-Cornered Hat After a century after


Where

Palacio de la Madraza, University of Granada, Spain.

When

3rd – 5th July 2019


Organisation

Fundación Archivo Manuel de Falla/Universidad de Granada/Universidad
Complutense de Madrid/Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

Collaboration

Festival Internacional de Música y Danza de Granada/Acción Cultural
Española/Ayuntamiento de Granada/Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte-INAEM

Registration and further details

Please, visit our website:

https://sombrero3picos.wixsite.com/congresosombrero

Conference outline


On 22nd July 1919, in the Alhambra Theatre in London, the Diaghilev Ballets Russes premiered
one of the most relevant works in the history of Western dance and music, the international
projection of Spanish culture and the configuration of the Spanishness imaginary. This ballet
was based on the adaptation of Pedro Antonio de Alarcón’s book by María Lejárraga, and had
a score by Manuel de Falla, set and costume designs by Pablo Picasso and a choreography by
Léonide Massine. Since that moment, the ballet has been performed a huge number of times
around the world, with versions by the most significant choreographers, and still lives in the
repertoire of some current dance companies.
Moreover, The Three-Cornered Hat has focused the attention of many critics and scholars, who
have built a large historiography throughout the years, both in Spain and abroad, which might

Beethoven the European

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca, in collaboration with Ad Parnassum. A Journal of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Instrumental Music, is pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Beethoven the European», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 27 to 29 March 2020.

Keynote Speakers:
Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)
William Kinderman (University of California, Los Angeles)

Beethoven’s impact is widely recognised as of seemingly universal, timeless significance; 250 years since his birth his music still communicates with and inspires people across the globe. Nevertheless his iconic, enduring oeuvre stems from a specific European cultural milieu and historical context. To what extent does the tension between the universality and particularity of Beethoven’s music give rise to a richer understanding of his music and its reception history?
Beethoven’s creative inspiration was nurtured in the European context of revolution and political reshaping, at the aesthetic turning-point from Enlightenment to Romanticism, and at the social turning-point from largely private patronage to a more market-orientated environment for composers.

Born in the German Rhineland and resident in Bonn and Vienna, he travelled little compared with contemporaries such as Mozart and Clementi, but his reputation quickly spread much further, to far-off countries such as Britain and Russia. His works attest to strong musical and ideological ties with France and England, and his stage works engage with scenarios in Spain, Hungary, the Netherlands and Greece, while his vocal works include settings in Latin, Italian, French, English and other languages as well as German. Beethoven’s intellectual outlook even extended beyond Europe, especially to Indian sources, reflecting European intellectual currents of his time. Clearly there is still much to discover about the way in which Beethoven’s music was both influenced by and in turn influenced European culture, as well as about the way Beethoven as a European has been perceived and interpreted in a wider context.

Our conference aims to explore the multivalent connections between Beethoven and Europe through multifaceted study of the music both in a European and, where relevant, a wider global multi-cultural context. We would encourage consideration of the theme through the intermingling of and interface between topics and sub-disciplines, text and music, analysis and interpretation, genesis and reception. The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics related to the concept of ‘Beethoven and Europe’ are also welcome:

  • The European as complement or contrast to the Universal nature of Beethoven’s musical and/or personal identity
  • Connections with the forms, styles and influences of particular European countries or cultures
  • Setting of, and interest in texts in different languages
  • Dramatic works and their relation to historical contexts
  • Political attitudes reflected in works or words
  • Beyond Europe’s boundaries: Beethoven and Asia
  • Reception across Europe and in countries related to Europe
  • Historic performance as a means of understanding context, and as a basis for modern performance
  • Innovative analyses, sketch studies and reinterpretation of sources as a way to explore issues of the universal and particular
  • Dispersal of source material across European libraries and collections

Programme Committee:

  • Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)
  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • William Kinderman (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Malcolm Miller (The Open University, UK)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 13 October 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of October 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

 

Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research

‘BEYOND “MESEARCH”: AUTOETHNOGRAPHY, SELF-REFLEXIVITY, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AS ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN MUSIC STUDIES’

Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16-17 April 2018, Senate House, London

*NB This event has now been expanded to a two-day conference*

Registration: https://store.surrey.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/fass-faculty-of-arts-social-sciences/conferences/autoethnography-selfreflexivity-and-personal-experience-in-music-studies-1617-april-2018

Provisional Programme: https://christopherwiley.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/imr-conference-programme-provisional-16-17-04-18.pdf

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

International conference for PhD students

International conference for PhD students

 “Musicology (in)action: Past musics, present practices, future prospects”

 Thessaloniki, 9 – 11 February 2018

 The Department of Music Studies of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the Department of Music Science and Art of the University of Macedonia will host, under the auspices of the Hellenic Musicological Society, an international conference for PhD students entitled “Musicology (in)action: Past musics, present practices, future prospects” in Thessaloniki, Greece, from 9 to 11 of February 2018.

 

Call for papers

In recent years, musicology has tested its boundaries, objects of study, and, indeed, prospected future through the constant questioning of its subfields, themes, and methodological underpinnings. At the same time, this interrogative process has also been one of constant development of new, often interdisciplinary methodological approaches, frequently extending their grasp on new or hitherto neglected musical repertoires. It is this ambiguous state of conditions that the novice in the field of musicological research faces in her/his everyday effort to situate her/his own research within a constantly changing disciplinary environment. This conference aims to bring together fresh ideas of new researchers in an attempt to help them secure their position with respect to the ongoing discourse of musicology’s saga and with an eye to the future prospects of the field.

 

We welcome proposals of PhD students for 20-minute paper presentations or 40- to 80-minute panel presentations (of up to four participants), addressing a variety of old and new(er) research topics from the broad field of musicology (e.g. historical and cultural musicology, music theory and analysis, ethnomusicology and musical anthropology, music psychology, computational musicology, music philosophy and aesthetics). Proposals on topics that cross the strict intra- or inter-disciplinary boundaries of musicology are also welcomed.

Proposals and inquiries should be submitted to the following email address:

conf.phd.2018@gmail.com

 

Proposals for paper presentations should include:

– name of participant(s) and institutional affiliation(s)

– abstract (up to 300 words)

– brief CV (up to 100 words)

 

Proposals for panel presentations should include:

– name of participants and institutional affiliations

– general abstract of proposed panel presentation (up to 300 words)

– individual abstract of each participant’s presentation (up to 300 words)

– brief CV of each participant (up to 100 words)

 

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSAL SUBMISSION: 30 May 2017

NOTIFICATION OF APPROVAL: No later than 15 July 2017

PARTICIPATION FEE: PhD students: 50 euros, undergraduate and master’s students: 30 euros

OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: English

For more information on the reviewing committee, the venue of the conference, etc. please visit the conference’s website (which is under construction):

http://conferences.lib.auth.gr/ICMDR/index/index

 

ACADEMIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE:

Chardas Konstantinos

Nika-Sampson Evanthia

Pastiadis Konstantinos

Vouvaris Petros

 

COORDINTAING COMMITTEE

Kalaitzidou Stamatia

Spanoudakis Dimosthenis

Toumanidou Katerina

Trouka Dimitra

Zlatkou Vasiliki

 

ORGANISING COMMITTEE

Apostolou Andreas Foivos

Authentopoulou Despoina

Banteka Dimitra

Diminakis Nikos

Karamanidis Charalampos

Nikolaidis Nikos

Ntousiopoulou Antigoni

Ntovas Christos

Pouris Christos

Roumpi Antonia

Savvidou Charoula

Scarlatou Chrysa

Seglias Zisis

Sidiropoulou Christina

Sotiriadis Theophilos

Tasoudis Dimitris

‘I Am Not There’ International Conference on Bob Dylan

18-19 May 2017

Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, NOVA University of Lisbon.
Organization: CETAPS and CESEM

Call for Papers
(until 26 January 2017)

In 1999, Bob Dylan (b. 1941) was included in the ‘Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century’ as a “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize jury awarded Dylan a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, the artist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. The New York Times (13-10-2016) reported: “Mr. Dylan, 75, is the first musician to win the award, and his selection on Thursday is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901…In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honor, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels”. After the official Nobel announcement, opinions divided the public and critics. CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) and CESEM (Sociology and Musical Aesthetics Research Center), NOVA University of Lisbon, decided to analyze and celebrate the aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural significance of Bob Dylan’s musical, literary and artistic (visual) work, as well as its influence(s).
The initial expression in the conference’s title is the title of the biographical musical drama film I Am Not There (2007, directed by Todd Haynes and co-written with Oren Moverman), which intercuts the storylines of seven different Dylan-inspired characters. According to Haynes, “the minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that’s why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him – things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate” (apud D. Dalton, Who Is the Man?: In Search of the Real Bob Dylan, 2012).

We will privilege comparative and transdisciplinary approaches. Potential contributors are invited to submit a bionote and a 300 word abstract on themes related to any of the following conference tracks:

• Influences in/of Dylan’s music;
• Bob Dylan and awards;
• The ‘power’ of the Nobel prize for literature;
• The alter-egos and personas of Robert Zimmerman/Bob Dylan (Blind boy Grunt, Bob Landy, Tedham Porterhouse, etc.);
• Dylan’s music videos;
• Dylan in/as performance;
• Dylan and religion;
• Art, activism, protest, and social unrest;
• Dylan on stage – presence, performance and liveliness;
• Dylanesque spaces and places;
• Influences in/of Dylan’s visual art;
• Intertextuality in Dylan’s lyrics, music and videos (text-music relationship);
• Intermediality in musical genres and practices;
• Lyrics as/and poetry/literary narratives;
• Dylan depicted (visual biographies, photography, press and record [album] covers, official website);
• Dylan in cyberspace (myspace, facebook, youtube, etc);
• Dylan’s songs;
• Dylan as trend-setter;
• Musical style(s) in Dylan;
• Bob Dylan in the classroom;
• Adaptation of Dylan’s texts as children’s literature;
• Dylan in/and translation;
• Dylan’s fandom;
• Academia and Dylan’s fandom;
• Music as a social and political agent in Dylan’s and other composers’ production;
• Dylan, music and the moving image (cinema, documentary, television, internet);
• The roles and ideologies of musical, literary and artistic criticism: after Dylan;
• Gender and music;
• Listening to Dylan: social behaviors, musical taste, consumption patterns.

Working languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish. No translation will be provided.

Papers and panels on the above themes are invited. However, papers/panels on other subjects related to the above topics will also be considered. Participants will be held to a twenty minute presentation limit. Please submit an abstract and a bio note, by 05 January 2017, to the conference email:

bobdylanconferenceportugal@gmail.com

To ensure prompt notification, please include your e-mail address on your submission. If you are interested in chairing a session, please note this at the top of your abstract.
Registration fee: 80 euros. BA and MA students: 30 euros.

Conference website: https://internationalconferenceonbobdylanportugal2017.wordpress.com/

Coordination: Rogério Puga (CETAPS) e Paula Gomes Ribeiro (CESEM).

Embodied Monologues Symposium

Call for Papers and Performances

EMBODIED MONOLOGUES SYMPOSIUM — MARCH 31, 2017

MAYNOOTH UNIVERSITY, IRELAND

Deadline for Proposals: January 9, 2017

In recent years, the emergence of practice-based and performance-led research has generated dynamic, productive and provocative new forms of understanding in humanities scholarship. Knowledge and experience derived from embodied practices have done much to expand the epistemic fields centred on the body and its place in philosophy and aesthetics. Associated with these developments, topics such as voice, performativity and subjectivity have been transformed and have in turn reshaped contemporary political and social concerns, and questions of human rights, disabilities, inequality, gender, and racial and social segregation.

The emergence of movement philosophy and literature especially, as well as a greater emphasis on the performer’s body as predicated in contemporary theatre practices, has opened new pathways for research only recently applied to music performance. As the one and only dramatic figure in monologues and monodramas, the solo performer has unprecedented agency in the dramaturgy and enactment of the piece. Yet even in monodrama, a dramatic genre supposedly condensed into one stage figure, production and staging are still the result of multilayered processes and agencies.

Embodied Monologues seeks to generate responses and challenges to the idea of solo or ‘mono’ performance. What is the role of the intertextual, the multimedial, the intercorporeal in this mode of performance? According to Bakthin’s The Dialogic Imagination “the centripetal forces of the life of language, embodied in a unitary language, operate in the midst of heteroglossia”. In performance, monologues and monodramas demonstrate the dynamics of this notion, combining the individual and the collective, the solo and the dialogical in complex and revealing ways. The series will explore solo performance through practice and research across the humanities, investigating the multiple forces at work during the production and performative processes. Embodied Monologues aims to promote an interdisciplinary exchange among performers, researchers, and practitioners whose work is based primarily—however not exclusively—on solo performance.

Proposals are invited for individual papers, lecture recitals, research reports, posters, video-installations and specific sessions in any area of solo embodied or practice-led research. Deadline for abstract (maximum 300 words) and short bio (maximum 100 word) is January 9, 2017. Proposals should be uploaded at http://www.embodiedmonologues.com/

KEYNOTE EVENTS:

Catherine Laws, Senior Lecturer Department of Music University of York, Senior Research Fellow at the Orpheus Institute, Ghent (BE);

Róisín O’Gorman, Lecturer in Drama & Theatre Studies, University College Cork.

SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZER:

Francesca Placanica, Maynooth University Francesca.Placanica@nuim.ie

 

COMMITTEE:

Christopher Morris, Professor of Music, Maynooth University;

Francesca Placanica, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Maynooth University;

Benjamin Spatz, Senior Lecturer in Drama Theatre and Performance, University of Huddersfield.

 

ODC2017 Traditions-Transitions

Orpheus Doctoral Conference 2017

Traditions-Transitions

22-23 February 2017

Orpheus Institute, Ghent

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Orpheus Doctoral Conference 2017, Traditions-Transitions, will explore how different modes of relationships between past and present affect musical performance practice and composition. Further, practitioners and researchers from the fields of music and social sciences will draw on Eric Hobsbawm’s notion of “invented traditions”, examining how traditions are forged, broken or interrupted and how they might be used as sources of renewal.

The conference will feature lectures by Richard Taruskin, Joanna Dudley (tbc), Sigiswald Kuijken and Esteban Buch as well as a musical gallery in which performances and installations addressing the conference topics will be interspersed with moderated discussions between artists and our guest speakers.

We invite researchers, practitioners and artist researchers within related fields to submit proposals that address the broad range of issues involved in the conference topics. Submissions should include, but are not limited to, themes that place strong emphasis on the interplay between social practices and musical performance. We welcome contributions in the form of theoretical papers, performances or a combination of the two.

For more information please visit http://www.orpheusinstituut.be/en/news/2016/10/call-for-proposals-odc-2017.

With the friendly support of the Academy of Creative and Performing Arts of the University of Leiden.

 

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION

Submissions should be sent by email to odc2017@docartes.be and must include:

  • Name, organization (if any), email and phone contact
  • Abstract (max 250 words) + 3 keywords
  • Technical rider for proposals requiring equipment other than A/V
  • List of references (optional)
  • Short bio (max 150 words) and list of main publications/performances/works as well as links to supporting image, audio and video files.

Presentations are limited to 20 minutes. The language of the conference is English.

Call for proposals deadline: 15 November 2016

Notification of acceptance: 15 December 2016