Pop – Power – Positions

Global Relations and Popular Music
3rd IASPM D-A-CH Symposium

Bern (Switzerland), 18–20 October 2018

In Nigeria, the high pressure to follow the copyright rules of the globalized pop music market restrains the use of samples in hip hop culture. In Egypt, young musicians have no credit cards, leaving them without access to the online music market. In Europe, second and third generation migrants discuss their non-European backgrounds and European identities in songs and tracks. And U.S.-produced Korean pop music (K-Pop) increasingly rivals Korean-produced K-Pop in its concern for authentic presentation.
Issues of power, position, access, and representation have shaped the production, distribution, and reception of popular music and continue to do so today. The three-day interdisciplinary conference Pop – Power – Positions highlights popular music’s embeddedness in a global world. It seeks to uncover and scrutinize the risks, challenges, and potentials of power structures, positioning, and (re)presentations in popular music. The analysis of global, postcolonial structures plays a central role in this endeavour. To date, however, music– and popular music in particular – has only rarely been studied using postcolonial perspectives.
Postcolonialism refers not only to the historical fact of colonialism and its political, geographical, cultural, and economic impact on the countries and regions involved. Rather, postcolonial studies deal with all aspects of cultural diversity, ethnic and cultural difference, and their related power structures. Colonialism as well as postcolonialism refer to hierarchies that are enacted and produced through the construction of the Other and bring about and enforce debateable concepts of representation such as gender, race, ethnic group, nation, class, and culture. In this regard, the effects of (post)colonialism can be detected not only in former colonialized and colonising countries and regions, but also in those which at first sight do not have a colonial heritage, for example Switzerland.
From its beginnings, popular music has been produced and performed in and within (post)colonial (power) structures. Postcolonial traces are, according to Johannes Ismaiel-Wendt, inherent in any popular music (2011). Current productions of popular music in different countries show that (post)colonial conditions live on in popular music, especially in a globalised world, and that musicians as well as recipients react in various ways to this situation.
The conference focuses on (global) power relations and representations of race, cultural difference, ethnicity, gender, class, and nation, including the changes and subversive strategies these may involve. Ethnographic and analytical studies of popular music in and from (former) colonised countries and regions are also welcome.

We invite papers that address the following range of topics and questions:
Power
– Who speaks in popular music? What kinds of power structures shape the production, distribution, and reception of popular music? What is the impact of the Anglophone music business on other music markets? Who speaks about popular music in the areas of marketing, advertising, journalism, fan cultures, (global) politics, and educational institutions – and what vocabulary do they use?
– Have digitalisation and digital networks led to a democratisation of musical processes, or the contrary?
– What sounds and music(s) are processed in what contexts by whom and how, and to what aim? How does the use of certain sounds/music(s) point to existing power relations, dependencies, and availability?
Place
– What role do geographies and geopolitics play in popular music-making? How do geography, world order, and power structures relate?
– In what ways can popular music exist beyond cultural, ethnic, and national geographies? What role does the relation between the Global North and Global South have in popular music?
Positions
– How do structures of power and distribution limit the access to the production and reception of popular music?
– What relevance, usability, and impact do technologies (like Digital Audio Workstations) or legal regulations (like the copyright laws) that have been developed in Western contexts have for popular music? In what ways are (post)colonial structures and power relations (re)produced therein?
– What kinds of representations do musicians use for their marketing? What traits are ascribed to music?
Postcolonialism
– What potential does popular music hold for detecting and changing (or enforcing) colonial and postcolonial power structures?
– How can postcolonial theories be made fruitful for an up-to-date understanding of popular music?
– How do musicians of different forms of popular music process a „(post)colonial experience of the world” („(post)koloniales Welterleben“, Ismaiel-Wendt) in their music?
Popular Music Studies
– How marginalised are specific popular musics within the history of popular music?
– Should or can we write a Global History of Popular Music?
– In what way is the concept of popular music in itself (post)colonial?
– What hierarchies, asymmetries or restraints can be found in inter-/transdisciplinary Popular Music Studies?

Keynote: Dr Jenny Fatou Mbaye (City University London)

Contributions on popular music that lie outside the scope of these topic areas are
welcome and will be considered if possible.

Call in GermanCall in English

Please email your abstract to daniel.allenbach@hkb.bfh.ch by 28 February 2018

More information: http://www.hkb-interpretation.ch/veranstaltungen/pop-power-positions

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Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research

‘BEYOND “MESEARCH”: AUTOETHNOGRAPHY, SELF-REFLEXIVITY, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AS ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN MUSIC STUDIES’

Institute of Musical Research (IMR) Study Day

in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London

16 April 2018, Senate House, London

CFP: deadline for submissions 12 January 2018

Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research-department/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

Keynote Speakers: Professor Neil Heyde (Royal Academy of Music, London); Professor Darla Crispin (Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo); Ian Pace (City, University of London)

The advent of autoethnography, a form of qualitative social science research that combines an author’s narrative self-reflection with analytical interpretation of the broader contexts in which that individual operates (e.g. Etherington, 2004; Chang, 2008), has come at a critical time for the discipline of music. In the UK, the expectation of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) that creative practice outputs will be contextualised through an accompanying commentary signals the urgency for establishing scholarly structures suited to the discussion of one’s own work by performers, composers, and music technologists alike.

The recent inauguration of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), meanwhile, places a renewed emphasis on pedagogic research, for which autoethnography will increasingly prove to be critical in facilitating discourse on individual teachers’ experiences, in anticipation of the upcoming subject pilot for TEF and discipline-level evaluation being implemented more widely thereafter. As a methodology, autoethnography also yields enormous breadth of potential elsewhere in music studies, with the capacity to support academic enquiry encompassing individual experiences as listener or concert-goer, habits and modes of music consumption, and conduct as fans or aficionados.

While autoethnographic approaches have received significant application to the discipline of music internationally, for instance in Australia (Bartleet & Ellis, 2009) and the US (Manovski, 2014), this study day aims to raise its visibility at such a timely juncture in the UK. It will thereby consolidate the seminal contributions made by isolated studies in areas such as music education (Wiley & Franklin, 2017; Kinchin & Wiley, 2017), sonic arts (Findlay-Walsh, 2018), and composition and performance (Armstrong & Desbruslais, 2014). It also offers significant opportunity to initiate dialogue with academic fields as disparate as the social sciences, education, and health studies, in which autoethnography is more substantively practised.

At the same time, this study day will bring together composers, performers, musicologists, and music teachers, seeking to explore different modes of autoethnography with a view to establishing an analytical vein in continuation of previous work undertaken within music studies (e.g. Bartleet & Ellis, 2009). With an emphasis on transcending the production of so-called ‘mesearch’ – work that merely draws upon the author’s autobiographical description in an academic context – the event will cultivate modes of engagement in music research that enable scholar-practitioners at all levels to locate their experiences within a robust intellectual framework as well as to articulate their relationship to wider sociocultural contexts.

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

20-minute papers (plus 10 minutes for questions) are invited on any aspect relevant to the study day’s themes.

Proposals for panels of 3–4 papers (1.5–2 hours) on a closely related topic are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (3–5 participants, 1 hour duration). The latter should be thematically integrated and dialogue-based rather than simply a series of unconnected mini-papers.

Note that papers will be expected to offer some critical self-reflection on method, and not merely to set out ground covered in an individual’s own practice. Those that adopt non-traditional formats, or incorporate a practice as research component, will be warmly welcomed.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be e-mailed by 12 January 2018 to Christopher Wiley, c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk (enquiries to the same address). Decisions will be communicated to speakers by 5 February 2018.

The registration fee will be £20 per person (reduced rates of £10 available for students/the unwaged), including lunch and refreshments. A limited number of bursaries will be offered to students/the unwaged to offset travel costs, up to a maximum of £60 each.

Organising Committee: Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey, Chair), Iain Findlay-Walsh (University of Glasgow), Tom Armstrong (University of Surrey)

Study Day Supporters: Institute of Musical Research, in association with the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House (funding supplied by Nick Baker)

Further information: Dr Christopher Wiley (University of Surrey): c.wiley@surrey.ac.uk

‘I Am Not There’ International Conference on Bob Dylan

18-19 May 2017

Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, NOVA University of Lisbon.
Organization: CETAPS and CESEM

Call for Papers
(until 26 January 2017)

In 1999, Bob Dylan (b. 1941) was included in the ‘Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century’ as a “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize jury awarded Dylan a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, the artist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. The New York Times (13-10-2016) reported: “Mr. Dylan, 75, is the first musician to win the award, and his selection on Thursday is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901…In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honor, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels”. After the official Nobel announcement, opinions divided the public and critics. CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) and CESEM (Sociology and Musical Aesthetics Research Center), NOVA University of Lisbon, decided to analyze and celebrate the aesthetic, historical, political, and cultural significance of Bob Dylan’s musical, literary and artistic (visual) work, as well as its influence(s).
The initial expression in the conference’s title is the title of the biographical musical drama film I Am Not There (2007, directed by Todd Haynes and co-written with Oren Moverman), which intercuts the storylines of seven different Dylan-inspired characters. According to Haynes, “the minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was. He’s like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you’ll surely get burned. Dylan’s life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that’s why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him – things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate” (apud D. Dalton, Who Is the Man?: In Search of the Real Bob Dylan, 2012).

We will privilege comparative and transdisciplinary approaches. Potential contributors are invited to submit a bionote and a 300 word abstract on themes related to any of the following conference tracks:

• Influences in/of Dylan’s music;
• Bob Dylan and awards;
• The ‘power’ of the Nobel prize for literature;
• The alter-egos and personas of Robert Zimmerman/Bob Dylan (Blind boy Grunt, Bob Landy, Tedham Porterhouse, etc.);
• Dylan’s music videos;
• Dylan in/as performance;
• Dylan and religion;
• Art, activism, protest, and social unrest;
• Dylan on stage – presence, performance and liveliness;
• Dylanesque spaces and places;
• Influences in/of Dylan’s visual art;
• Intertextuality in Dylan’s lyrics, music and videos (text-music relationship);
• Intermediality in musical genres and practices;
• Lyrics as/and poetry/literary narratives;
• Dylan depicted (visual biographies, photography, press and record [album] covers, official website);
• Dylan in cyberspace (myspace, facebook, youtube, etc);
• Dylan’s songs;
• Dylan as trend-setter;
• Musical style(s) in Dylan;
• Bob Dylan in the classroom;
• Adaptation of Dylan’s texts as children’s literature;
• Dylan in/and translation;
• Dylan’s fandom;
• Academia and Dylan’s fandom;
• Music as a social and political agent in Dylan’s and other composers’ production;
• Dylan, music and the moving image (cinema, documentary, television, internet);
• The roles and ideologies of musical, literary and artistic criticism: after Dylan;
• Gender and music;
• Listening to Dylan: social behaviors, musical taste, consumption patterns.

Working languages: Portuguese, English, Spanish. No translation will be provided.

Papers and panels on the above themes are invited. However, papers/panels on other subjects related to the above topics will also be considered. Participants will be held to a twenty minute presentation limit. Please submit an abstract and a bio note, by 05 January 2017, to the conference email:

bobdylanconferenceportugal@gmail.com

To ensure prompt notification, please include your e-mail address on your submission. If you are interested in chairing a session, please note this at the top of your abstract.
Registration fee: 80 euros. BA and MA students: 30 euros.

Conference website: https://internationalconferenceonbobdylanportugal2017.wordpress.com/

Coordination: Rogério Puga (CETAPS) e Paula Gomes Ribeiro (CESEM).

The Power of Hip Hop: EXCHANGE

One day seminar around hip hop and social change

 

FRIDAY 8TH JULY, 9.30 – 17.00 (plus post-event networking and music)

Venue: RichMix, Bethnal Green Road, London

 

Full Price: £45

Student / Concession: £36

SPECIAL DISCOUNT: Use code hiphop15 at checkout to get your £15 ticket

Lunch, refreshments and delegate packs provided.

To Book: https://www.richmix.org.uk/events/music/power-hip-hop-exchange

The Power of Hip Hop: LIVE is a unique academic seminar that explores the role, challenges and potential of hip hop culture in facilitating social change in global contexts, and its role as a site of resistance and identity.

Keynote Speakers

Martha Diaz (NYU Gallatin)

Hip-Hop Without Borders: A Revolutionary Global Movement of Struggle, Liberation and Sustainable Living”

Jason Nichols (University of Maryland)

Lean wit it:  Black Masculinities in Hip-Hop Dance”

Plus special introduction about In Place of War’s work by Professor James Thompson

 

Four diverse panels exploring: 

  • Global power of hip hop
  • Cultural power of hip hop
  • Power of place & identity
  • Hip hop and pedagogy

International Artist Presentations by

Shhorai (Colombia)

Zambezi News (Zimbabwe)

Smockey (Burkina Faso)

 

For a full programme and speaker list visit: cultconflictchange.wix.com/powerofhiphop

Steering Group

Richard Bramwell (University of Cambridge)

Eithne Quinn (University of Manchester)

Teresa Bean (In Place of War)

Featuring a programme of academic panels, keynote papers, artist presentations and practitioner provocations, this event harnesses In Place of War’s vast international network of grassroots artists and blends it with a rich selection of researchers exploring issues including but not limited to hip-hop and gender, race, religion, commerce, and conflict.

A day full of rich discussion, unique encounters, thought-provoking papers and academic-artist exchange.

The Power of Hip Hop: EXCHANGE is part of In Place of War’s event series Culture. Conflict. Change. taking place at RichMix throughout 2016. It is proudly funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council, and supported by Index on Censorship.

Find out about the rest of the series here: www.cultconflictchange.wix.com/powerofhiphop 

 

About In Place of War: www.inplaceofwar.net

About Index on Censorship: www.indexoncensorship.org

 

#PowerOfHipHop

International Conference of Young Musicologists. Young Musicology Today: tendencies, challenges and perspectives

The aim of the conference is to integrate the musicological community through the creation of an international forum for exchanging ideas and research experiences. We encourage young musicologists to present results from ongoing studies and to engage in discussion on the future of musicology, its role and place in the contemporary culture. Currently, musicology, which is not only the study of music, is starting to perform social functions, becoming not only a field of scientific inquiry but one of use to society. During the conference, we would like to consider new avenues of research, new methodologies of musicologists’ work, and the challenges and career prospects faced by musicologists entering the labour market. It will also be an opportunity to consider the subject areas of interest to young musicology.

Subject areas for consideration include

  • New research perspectives in musicology
  • Music versus other arts
  • Music in the public space (sonosphere research)
  • Music in society (music and ideologies)
  • Music and the sacred
  • Music and science (e.g. psychology of music)
  • Challenges of modern ethnomusicology
  • The state and the form of contemporary music criticism
  • Source studies and music editing
  • Music librarianship – issues and challenges
  • Performance practice
  • Theory of music
  • Music and pop culture
  • Opera nowadays

The conference will incorporate both traditional lectures and panel discussions, during which groups of researchers conducting a joint project or studying similar subjects will be able to present the results of their studies or discuss a specific subject. We encourage the participants to organise their own panel sessions during the conference (due to time constraints, we suggest no more than four papers during one session; please indicate the person leading the session during registration).

In addition, the conference programme includes:

  • “A musicologist on the labour market” panel

This will be an opportunity for an in-depth discussion of the current employment situation of musicology graduates in Poland and abroad, and for the presentation of experiences in this area. We encourage participation in this panel session by musicologists – musical life animators, employees of media and cultural and educational associations and institutions etc.

  • Masters’ lectures (plenary speakers)
  • The conference programme includes additional events, such as concerts, sightseeing in Krakow, and exhibitions.

A publication of the collected papers presented at the conference is also planned.

Conference language: English.

Schedule

  • Accepting applications with abstracts – until 31th of May 2016.
  • Information about accepted papers – by 30 June 2016.
  • Conference dates: 7-9 November 2016.

Applications should be made by sending the application form via email to: agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl  and musicologytoday@gmail.com

You can find an application form here.

For any further information please feel free to contact: Agnieszka Lakner; agnieszka.lakner@doctoral.uj.edu.pl

Conference fee

Conference fee: 200,00 PLN / 50 €

The fee includes:

Admission to the conference, conference program, publication of the paper in the conference proceedings, lunches and coffee breaks during sessions and conference attractions such as sightseeing and concerts. Registration fee does not include accommodation and transportation. If you wish, Organizers will help you to book an accommodation.

Organizer

Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Department of Musicology

Address: Westerplatte Street 10; 31-033 Kraków, Poland

http://www.muzykologia.uj.edu.pl

 

 

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

Gesellschaft für Tanzforschung · GTF Annual Conference 2016 · Call for papers

Sound – Traces – Moves. Soundtraces in Motion

November 18–20, 2016 · Orff-Institute of the University Mozarteum/Salzburg

The term TRACES has been positioned very intentionally between the two central artistic means of expression SOUNDS and MOVES, as interface so to speak, since sounds as well as bodily movements can both be regarded as traces due to their volatility in space and time. They can enter into a dialog with other artistic traces (of movement), such as the grand brushstroke of a painter, the fine drawings of a graphic artist or the light projections of a digital installation, in order to access further dimensions of space and time for the hearing and seeing of movement dynamics. Against this backdrop, an (in the best sense) endlessly creative process gathers momentum, in which audible and/or visible movement traces are permanently recreated, without ever getting clearly defined contours nor even taking a definite shape.

What kinds of artistic options are possible due to such interactions between sound- and movement traces, either in the form of a performance or an event? And what kinds of challenges result from this for the spectators/listeners – particularly if these interactions primarily unfold within the area of the non-verbal, beyond the obvious allocations of meaning or outstanding narrative threads? This conference will discuss perspectives based on (rehearsal) processes and production aesthetics as well as questions relating to the perception of the interplay of analogue/digital, instrumental/ vocal and musical or noise-like sounds with virtual or real body movements in choreographies, improvisations and dance performances: The objective is to ‘trace’ audio-visual movement traces and the resulting network of sensory impressions.

Deadline for proposals for lectures, workshops, poster presentations, lecture demonstrations, performances and labs (please give the preferred format) is May 1.

Please send the respective proposal with a maximum of 250 words and a short biography of 100 words at most to Stephanie Schroedter: st.schroedter@t-online.de

You will be informed about the programme selection by June 1, 2016 at the latest.
For more information look at: http://www.gtf-tanzforschung.de

XXIII Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society

XXIII ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF ITALIAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY

 

Como, Conservatory of music “Giuseppe Verdi”, 21-23 October 2016

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The twenty-third Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society will be hosted in Como from 21th-23rd October, in collaboration with the Conservatory of music “Giuseppe Verdi”. On October 22nd at 3 p.m. the annual Meeting of all members will take place.

 

The Conference will be divided into free paper sessions.

 

Scholars from all over the world are invited to submit their proposals.

 

In your abstract (which has not to exceed 30 lines in word format) please indicate the title of the proposed paper, the state of the art in your research field, with an outline of the project and the specific contribution to the current knowledge. Only original, unpublished research will be taken into consideration: papers in print will not be accepted.

 

Along with the text please send also a short C/V (max. 15 lines) and indicate the A/V equipment required.

 

The paper shall not exceed 20 minutes in duration (corresponding to an 8-page text containing to a maximum of 16000 characters). Scholars are not allowed to send more than one abstract. The abstracts have to be sent to the e-mail address convegni@sidm.it or – by mail – to the Società Italiana di Musicologia, Casella Postale 318 Ag. Roma Acilia, via Saponara 00125 Rome, Italy (please add on the envelope the indication “XXIII Convegno annuale”) no later than June 15, 2016. Acceptance of papers will be notified by July, 15, 2016.

 

We inform you that one session of the conference will be entitled “From the Belle Epoque to the First World War: in search for a Musical Identity”, and based on the topics exposed in the book “Italia 1911. Musica e società alla fine della Belle Époque” (Milano, Guerini Associati, 2014).

 

Please provide your full name, address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address. For further information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.sidm.it.

Ludo2016 – Fifth Anniversary Conference on Video Game Music and Sound

We are delighted to announce our Call for Papers for Ludo 2016! Please help circulate our poster online, and around your institutions!

poster-thumb

April 8th–10th, University of Southampton
Fifth Anniversary Conference on
Video Game Music and Sound
Call for Papers

The organizers of Ludo2016 are accepting proposals for research presentations at the fifth annual Easter conference. While we welcome all proposals, we are particularly interested in papers that support the theme of ‘Video Game Audio and History’. Possible topics on this theme include:

  • Factors in the history and development of game audio,
  • The changing relationships between music in games and in other media,
  • Challenges and approaches to game audio historiography,
  • Canonicity and the curation of game audio,
  • Video game music and other music histories.

Presentations should last twenty minutes, to be followed by questions. Please submit your paper proposal (c.200 words) by email to ludomusicology@gmail.com by January 31st 2016.

We also welcome session proposals from organizers representing two to four individuals; the organizer should submit an introduction to the theme and c.200 word proposals for each paper.

Proposals for papers in alternative formats, such as performances or demonstrations, should be discussed with the conference organizers before the abstract is submitted.

The conference will feature keynote addresses by Neil Lerner (Davidson College), co-editor of Music in Video Games: Studying Play (Routledge, 2014), and Andrew Barnabas (Bob and Barn), composer of Brink (2011) and MediEvil (1998).

#ludo2016

Hosted by Kevin Donnelly, the Music Department and the Film Department at the University of Southampton.

southampton

Organized by Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers, Mark Sweeney.

Popular Music and Public Diplomacy

Technische Universität Dortmund, Germany
6-8 November 2015

Call for Papers

In the early years of the Cold War, Western nations increasingly turned towards popular music in their public diplomacy. While the diplomatic use of popular music was initially limited to such genres as jazz and gospel, the second half of the twentieth century saw a growing presence of various popular genres in diplomatic contexts, including country, bluegrass, rock, punk, reggae, and hip-hop. As an instrument of public diplomacy, popular music plays a complex role in contested terrain. Whether it functions as cultural subversion, as a reaffirmation of cultural hegemony, or as a combination of both is conditioned by a web of interdependent factors ranging from the music itself to its mediation and appropriation in different contexts.

Music diplomacy has not only impacted the ways in which audiences perceive foreign cultures, but it has also helped to shape the cultural horizons of politicians, diplomats, cultural managers, journalists, and musicians involved in diplomatic programs. In this way, music diplomacy has had highly significant cultural and aesthetic effects. The musicians’ role as their countries’ cultural ambassadors, for instance, had the potential to lead to radical transformations in the way they were perceived at home, forcing them to reconfigure their rhetorical and musical legitimation as artists. In a way, the diplomatic usability of musicians as ambassadors is an aesthetic and performative benchmark by means of which artists have re-defined themselves and their work. International cultural exchange with local musicians in host countries likewise inspired musical ambassadors to venture into previously unknown musical and cultural territories, thus impacting their aesthetics and oeuvres.

This conference seeks to illuminate the diplomatic function of popular music from a transnational and transdisciplinary perspective, accentuating its interconnectivity and dissemination across national borders. We are particularly interested in the nexus of power, popularity, aesthetics, and cultural exchange. How did popular music function in the ideological conflict between East and West, for instance, and how did its function change after the fall of the Iron Curtain? How did U.S. popular music programs interact with other nations’ initiatives to channel their self-representation through popular music? Who are the agents, stakeholders, and gatekeepers of popular music diplomacy? What is the role of celebrity in music diplomacy? Has popular music been an “efficient” instrument of national and communal self-representation and how do institutions measure its efficiency?

Proposals:
We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines, including cultural studies, musicology, ethnomusicology, political science, diplomacy studies, history, sociology, literature, international relations, and other relevant fields. Proposals should include a title, 250 word abstract, technical requirements, and short biographical sketch. Please submit your proposal by 1 April 2015 to musicaldiplomacy2015@gmail.com.

Keynote speakers include Martha Bayles (Boston College, U.S.) and Klaus Nathaus (University of Oslo, Norway).

The conference is hosted by the English Department and the Department of Music and Musicology at TU Dortmund University, Germany.

Organizing Committee:
Mario Dunkel (TU Dortmund University, Germany)
Sina Nitzsche (TU Dortmund University, Germany)

Conference website: http://www.musicaldiplomacy.org

XXII ANNUAL CONFERENCE SOCIETY ITALIAN OF MUSICOLOGY

XXII ANNUAL CONFERENCE SOCIETY ITALIAN OF MUSICOLOGY

Perugia, Conservatorio di musica “Francesco Morlacchi”

30-31 ottobre, 1 novembre 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

The twenty-second Annual Conference of the Italian Musicological Society will be hosted in Perugia  from 30th October to 1st  November 2015, in collaboration with the Conservatory of Music “Francesco Morlacchi”. On October 31st at 4 p.m. the annual Meeting of all members will take place .

The Conference will be divided in 4 free paper sessions and 2 theme-oriented sessions about

  1. musical sources and new research topics;
  2. new acquisitions in organology.

 

Scholars from all over the world are invited to submit their proposals.

In your abstract (which has not to exceed 30 lines in word format compatible) please indicate the title of the proposed paper, the state of the art in your research field, with an outline of the project and the specific contribution to the current knowledge.

Along with the text please send also a short C/V (max. 15 lines) and indicate the A/V equipment required.

The paper shall not exceed 20 minutes in duration (corresponding to an 8-page text containing to a maximum of 16000 characters). Scholars are not allowed to send more than one abstract. The abstracts have to be sent to the e-mail address sellerfrancesca@gmail.com or – by mail – to the Società Italiana di Musicologia, Casella Postale 318 Ag. Roma Acilia, via Saponara 00125 Rome, Italy (please add on the envelope the indication “XXII Convegno Annuale”) no later than June 15, 2015.

Acceptance of papers will be notified by July, 15, 2015.

Please provide your full name, address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address. For further information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.sidm.it.