Naturalising Sounds: How Instrumental Music is (Made) National

International Conference, Regensburg, 22–23 January 2021
University of Regensburg, Department of Musicology

CfP deadline: 24 July 2020

In 1997 the symposium “French and German Music in the 20th Century” in Frankfurt am Main (“Französische und deutsche Musik im 20. Jahrhundert”) concluded that “today all national typology has lost its validity” (conference review in Die Musikforschung by Peter Jost). At the end of his article on “Nationalism” for the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Richard Taruskin, citing Mark Slobin, expressed a hope for a pluralistic global culture consisting of a “fascinating counterpoint of near and far, large and small, neighborhood and national, home and away”. This now seems to be contradicted by the nationalistic tendencies that are gaining popularity worldwide. Music does not remain untouched by this and can become the subject of ideological appropriation. Against this background, nationalistic currents of bygone music history gain relevance once more, after having been considered for some time as over and done with. Here we find actual examples of the mechanisms of making music “national” in a nationalistically charged socio-political climate.

The conference’s main focus lies on instrumental music and those particular moments in modern music history when national or even nationalistic qualities have been attributed to it. These instances occur outside the sounding music itself; they are manifested verbally: in texts accompanying music performances, writings of music theory and music history and, last but not least, in the press – see for example such different cases as Robert Schumann’s articles on Nils Wilhelm Gade in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik or Carl Mennicke playing off the “Mannheimer Schule” against the Italian opera introduction (Hasse und die Brüder Graun als Symphoniker, Leipzig 1906).

For the interpretation of such cases a distinction needs to be made between terms such as “national” and “nationalistic”, as well as “political”, “popular”/”folksy” and—as Peter Benary emphasized in 1979—“scenic” (“landschaftlich”). Raising questions about “moments” of nationalising music seems to be in contradiction to the long cultivated concept of folk music being the basis of all national musical characteristics. Despite this view, folk music is essentially a local or at least a regional phenomenon. Since a national element cannot constitute itself purely on the basis of sounds, there still have to be acts of reflection and interpretation to attribute such qualities to folk music.

It is the aim of this conference to discover these instances in the wide realm of instrumental music, to examine, analyse and compare them.

Keynote speaker will be Prof. Dr. Stefan Keym (University of Leipzig). As part of the conference there will be a concert with a thematically related programme (esp. Dmitri Shostakovitch’s Seventh Symphony) by the University Symphony Orchestra on 23 January.

We welcome papers of 20 minutes’ length settled in the area of modern music history, focussing on questions such as (but not excluding others):

Is it possible to distinguish different strategies of branding music with a nationality in historical or contemporary music criticism and analysis?

Who decides about the nationality of music? What are the criteria?

How are differences of opinion handled?

How does one become a national composer? Can this status be lost again?

Are there instrumental genres that at certain times tended to be treated and interpreted in a national context? What are the reasons for this?

How are obvious inter-national overlaps of musical material handled (Scotch snap, Lombard rhythm, Hungarian word emphasis)?

How is the “internationality” of particular music established?

Abstracts (2000 characters), along with a short autobiography (700 characters), should be sent to Dr. Michael Braun (michael4.braun@ur.de), Department of Musicology at the University of Regensburg, no later than 24 July 2020. Conference languages are German and English. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by 28 August 2020.

Popular songs in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

LUCCA, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

30 November – 2 December 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Popular songs in the 19th Century», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 30 November to 2 December 2019.

Even if its manifestation differs within the cultural areas in which it appears, the vogue of “popular song” seems to become a transnational phenomenon around the years 1820-1830. Following a period of political affirmation and education via the use of songs (during the French Revolution), this repertoire draws on traditional songs that, although often older (sometimes as old as the fifteenth century), are revived. The political and esthetic purposes of these productions remain to be investigated on a european scale.

The aim of this conference is multifaceted: from the investigation of the history of the nineteenth-century song from the beginning of the century up to the First World War, through evaluation and assessment of the repertoire, of the public and of the performance venues, to the isolation and identification of points of contact between different cultures from a global geographical perspective (Francophone, English-speaking, German, Italian, Spanish).

The possible answers to the essential question ‘What is popular song?’ acquire a central role in this context, since they concern not only its physical manifestations–the circumstances and places of performance of this repertoire–but also its meaning and significance: how the repertoire itself reflects the society of its origins.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • The Definition of “Popular Song” in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Literary Sources of the Repertoire
  • Musical Influences on the Repertoire
  • The Different Genres of Popular Song
  • Authors, Performers and Public
  • The Types of Entertainment Venues
  • The Production System of the Song in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Geography of the Song in Urban Spaces
  • Dissemination Through Editions, Press, etc.
  • The Cultural and Social Role of Popular Song

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Derek Scott (University of Leeds)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 28 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the half of May 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org

Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19th Century

organized by

Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca

Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Venice

 

Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto

18-20 October 2019

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccheriniof Lucca and Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française, Veniceare pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Performing Arts and Technical Issues in the 19thCentury», to be held in Lucca, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto, from 18 to 20 October 2019.

It is only in recent years that musicology has seriously begun to focus on opera staging, representing as it does a crucial element in our understanding of theatrical production. The visual component is integral to the compositional process of opera; it is already present in the stage directions contained in scene booklets and scores, before finding its ultimate form in the most comprehensive examples of stage-booklets. Cross-comparison of these books with the score, sets, costumes and press reports, often accompanied by illustrations and photographs of the scenery, can now generate an understanding of the ‘three-dimensionality’ of a particular opera.

The present conference aims to address several facets of the artistic expression of a live performance, in particular focusing on the technical issues, people and institutions related to it. Thus dance, musical theatre, mime, puppetry, and other performing arts will be investigated through the lens of their various components— staging, lighting, sound, costumes, theatrical machines — as well as their protagonists — impresarios, tournée, companies, designers, conductors and directors.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

  • Stage Machinery: Scene Changes, Lighting, Sound Effects, Set, Illusions, etc.
  • Economical and Administrative Issues
  • Companies and Tournées
  • Stage Direction, Movements and Gestures
  • Impresarios, Actors, Dancers, Designers, Conductors, etc.
  • Mime, Puppetry, Dance and Choreography
  • The Venues of Entertainment
  • Press, Staging Manuals, Literature and Handbooks

Programme Committee:

  • Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Étienne Jardin (Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française)
  • Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
  • Massimiliano Locanto (Università degli Studi di Salerno)
  • Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
  • Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Scott Palmer (School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds)
  • Catrina Flint (Vanier College, Montréal).

The official languages of the conference are English, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.

Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.

All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 7 April 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.

The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of April 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.

For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala

conferences@luigiboccherini.org

www.luigiboccherini.org