Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology. EAA 2020.

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

Rupert Till (and Raquel Jiménez and Margarita Díaz-Andreu)

Prof. Rupert Till PhD FHEA CMgr MCMI
Professor of Music
Associate Dean for International
School of Music, Humanities and Media
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield | Queensgate | Huddersfield | HD1 3DH
http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=smusrt
http://rupertchill.wordpress.com

Sound (of) Space Symposium

Please join us at the Sound (of) Space Symposium at UCL Here East, London on 11th December 2019

The Sound (of) Space Symposium will present a range of discussions around the challenges, creative opportunities and technical considerations when working with extreme and highly particular spatial conditions, across the related disciplines of architecture, engineering, music composition and performance.

The symposium will take place at UCL Here East on the 11th December 2019 and will include talks, presentations, performances and demonstrations from a wide range of academics and industry professionals including Prof. Trevor Cox (Uni.Salford), Adam Foxwell (Arup), Emma-Kate Matthews (UCL) and Freya Waley-Cohen (Royal Academy of Music), plus many more…

Please visit www.soundspacegroup.com to book your free ticket.

Sounds of Prehistory and Antiquity

Fourteenth conference of the Research Center for Music Iconography

Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center

New York, 24 May 2017

The study of music from the earliest past draws upon iconography and archaeology, and any attempt to understand the earliest acoustic ecologies requires some level of approximation based on material artefacts. Participants are invited to offer embodied, experiential, phenomenological, creative, practice-based and practice-led research that explores the sonic contexts of prehistory and antiquity. These explorations may consider the examination of sound-producing objects and musical instruments, acoustics of performance spaces, or role of sound in rituals, ceremonies and everyday events. Research is welcomed that uses digital technologies in (re)constructions of ancient soundscapes, and explorations of sonic textures drawing upon iconographic, archaeological and literary sources. Also considered may be performances or other artistic content, whether focused on musical, sonic, performance or visual arts. They should provide information about the source material which has created the basis of the work, but subsequently freely engage with performative explorations.

Abstracts of 250-300 words may be submitted before 15 February 2017 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309
zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

Rupert Till
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield
Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH
r.till@hud.ac.uk