Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology. EAA 2020.

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

Rupert Till (and Raquel Jiménez and Margarita Díaz-Andreu)

Prof. Rupert Till PhD FHEA CMgr MCMI
Professor of Music
Associate Dean for International
School of Music, Humanities and Media
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield | Queensgate | Huddersfield | HD1 3DH
http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=smusrt
http://rupertchill.wordpress.com

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era. International Conference celebrating 475 Years of the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona

immagine della Santissima Vergine Maria di Loreto della Giara in Verona, Stamperia del Seminario, Padova 1714 Domenico Zanatta Venezia 1665 Verona 5 agosto 1748

Verona, 1-3 June 2018

Call for Papers 
Deadline for proposals: 31 December 2017

The Soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the Early Modern Era is an international conference organized by the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona on the occasion of the 475th anniversary of its foundation (23 May 1543), in collaboration with University of Verona, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, University of St Andrews and Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona.
Natural sequel to The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, 24-27 May 2017 – vmo.unive.it/soundscape2017), this further initiative has the aim of increasing debate on the varied soundscape of the Venetian Terraferma in the early modern period. This territory, which stretched from Bergamo in the west to the Friulian Alps in the north-east and the river Po at the Republic’s southern extremity, formed one of the three subdivisions of the Serenissima; the others were the Dogado (Venice and surrounding area) and the Stato da mar (Venetian possessions in the eastern Adriatic and Mediterranean areas). The articulate system that regulates musical and non-musical sound in the Venetian territories prior to the fall of the Serenissima in 1797 is highly conducive to an interdisciplinary approach which draws on the new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology. Emblematic, in this sense, are the activities of the Accademia Filarmonica, which have dominated almost five centuries of local musical history.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

The conference will take place in Verona from 1-3 June 2018.

Suggested topics: 
– Sound and urban identity
– The sound of local civic ceremonial and devotional activities
– Reciprocal influence of Venetian and Terraferma soundscapes
– Musical relationships between the Terraferma cities and the courts of northern Italy and elsewhere
– Music and society (patronage; academies and other musical institutions, private and public; private uses of music)
– Educational, philosophical and social dynamics in musical practice
– The sounds of public and private festivities
– Musical theatre in the Terraferma and its social impact
– Music, urban architecture and the visual arts
– Music and economics (music printing, production and commerce of musical instruments, the economics of performance)
– Sound as material and non-material cultural heritage

One session of the conference will be entirely dedicated to research on the Accademia Filarmonica of Verona.

Peer-reviewed contributions will be published in a dedicated volume, scheduled to appear in 2019.

*** 

The programme committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, with 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Please email abstracts (max. 250 words), together with a short biography, to: biblioteca@academiafilarmonica.191.it

Further information will be available from September 2017 on the conference website, which will continue to be updated with details of costs, events and accommodation near the conference venue.

Accepted proposals will be announced before 16 February 2018.

*** 

Organizing Committee: 
Alessandro Arcangeli (University of Verona)
Vincenzo Borghetti (University of Verona)
David Douglas Bryant (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)
Luigi Collarile (University of Geneva)
Michele Magnabosco (Accademia Filarmonica, Verona)
Laura Moretti (University of St Andrews)
Laura Och (Conservatorio “E. F. Dall’Abaco” of Verona)

For further information please contact
Michele Magnabosco: biblioteca@accademiafilarmonica.191.it

http://www.accademiafilarmonica.org/filarmonica/en/convegno-internazionale-2018/

 

Sounds of Prehistory and Antiquity

Fourteenth conference of the Research Center for Music Iconography

Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center

New York, 24 May 2017

The study of music from the earliest past draws upon iconography and archaeology, and any attempt to understand the earliest acoustic ecologies requires some level of approximation based on material artefacts. Participants are invited to offer embodied, experiential, phenomenological, creative, practice-based and practice-led research that explores the sonic contexts of prehistory and antiquity. These explorations may consider the examination of sound-producing objects and musical instruments, acoustics of performance spaces, or role of sound in rituals, ceremonies and everyday events. Research is welcomed that uses digital technologies in (re)constructions of ancient soundscapes, and explorations of sonic textures drawing upon iconographic, archaeological and literary sources. Also considered may be performances or other artistic content, whether focused on musical, sonic, performance or visual arts. They should provide information about the source material which has created the basis of the work, but subsequently freely engage with performative explorations.

Abstracts of 250-300 words may be submitted before 15 February 2017 to:

Zdravko Blažeković
Research Center for Music Iconography
City University of New York, The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016-4309
zblazekovic@gc.cuny.edu

Rupert Till
Department of Music and Drama
University of Huddersfield
Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH
r.till@hud.ac.uk

The Soundscape of Early Modern Venice

International Conference
Venice, 25–27 May 2017

Organised by the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice (Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage), in collaboration with the Archivio Storico del Patriarcato di Venezia, the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Spazio Svizzero in Venice

CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline for proposals: 30 November 2016

On basis of new perspectives offered by urban history, humanistic geography and historical anthropology, the conference aims to bring together inter- and multidisciplinary approaches to the significance of “soundscape” in the context of the rich and complex urban system of early modern Venice. As a supreme example of “ceremonial city”, Venice is particularly suitable for investigating how soundscape interacts with urban space in the creation of an elaborate social and cultural identity.

The conference forms part of ‘The Sound of Eternity. A Digital Platform for the Polyphonic Choir-Books of the Ducal Chapel of St Mark’s, Venice’, a research project funded by the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, in continuation of ‘The Sound of Eternity. Investigating the Choir Books of the Ducal Chapel of St Mark’s, Venice’, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation.

The official languages of the conference are English and Italian.

Suggested topics for the conference include:
Soundscape and urban identity
Sound and civic ceremonial
Sound and space in urban life
Sound and the “Myth of Venice”
Tradition and innovation in urban soundscape
Urban sound and cultural patronage
The economics of sound in performance
Methodological perspectives

Selected papers will be published in English in a dedicated, peer-reviewed volume (to be published by Brepols, Turnhout, in the new series Venetian Music Studies).

Please email proposals (250-350 words) for 20-minute papers (with 10 minutes for questions and discussion) as well as a short biography to

soundscape2017@unive.it

Further updates and conference information will be available (from January 2017) on the conference website (which will continue to be updated with details about costs, events and accommodation as the conference draws nearer):

vmo.unive.it/soundscape2017

Accepted proposals will be announced before 15 December 2016.

Organising Committee
David Bryant, Augusto Celentano, Luigi Collarile, Renzo Orsini
Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

Please address all queries to:
David Bryant – david.bryant@unive.it
Luigi Collarile – luigi.collarile@unive.it