Technology in Musical Performance Symposium (TiMP)

3rd of December 2019 – Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, Birmingham City University

Technology in Musical Performance (TiMP) is a forum for all who engage with electronics in live music performance. The symposium aims to stimulate discussion and collaboration between performers, composers, sound artists, practitioners, programmers, software developers and sound designers on musical performance with/mediated by technology.

Performative electronics is an area of music that is constantly evolving and developing. Among composers and practitioners, the desire to realise specific musical ideas leads to creative technological solutions. For new developments in music and live electronics to be thoroughly tested and evaluated, dialogue between creators and practitioners is vital.

The theme of the first edition of this one-day conference is Technology in Musical Performance. The focus of the theme is on the performance aspect of the relationship between the performer and the technology involved.

Original contributions are encouraged in, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Performance strategies
  • (Mis)Appropriation of technology in music
  • Relationships with technology
  • Relationships mediated by technology
  • Musical dialogue in/through technology
  • Technology, technique & meaning
  • Visibility of performance with technology
  • Interactivity: static, dynamic…
  • Motion: micro/macro gesture from performers perspective
  • Performance: problems related / solutions involving technology
  • Technology as a source of inspiration/creativity

We will accept submissions of new works in the following categories:

  • Papers (15 mins)
  • Performances (15 mins) + Papers (15 mins)
  • Works in Progress

Requirements for abstracts, technical information, and downloadable templates can be found on the TiMP website: http://timp.integra.io

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 4 OCTOBER 2019

IMPORTANT DATES

  • 4 October 2019 – Abstract Submission Deadline
  • 18 October 2019 – Notification of Acceptance
  • 3 December 2019 – TiMP Conference

The conference is free to attend and will provide refreshments and a light lunch. Presenters and attendees are responsible for their own travel costs.

More info and application instructions at http://timp.integra.io

The TiMP Symposium is organised by the TiMP study group: Edmund HuntHollie HardingJoe WrightLaura Farré Rozada and Niccolò Granieri, music practitioners of different disciplines brought together by their interest in exploring electronics as a part of musical performance.

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

Opera and the City: Technologies of Displacement and Dissemination

National Theater of São Carlos

(Lisbon Opera House)

Lisbon, Portugal

24—25 June, 2019

Keynote Speakers:

David J. Levin (University of Chicago / Department Cinema and Media Studies)

Martha Feldman [to be confirmed] (University of Chicago / Department of Music)

Paulo Ferreira de Castro (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Program Committee:

Jelena Novak (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

João Pedro Cachopo (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

Mário Vieira de Carvalho (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CESEM)

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Since its inception in Italy around 1600, opera has maintained an intimate relationship with urban space and the public sphere. Most opera houses were erected in city centers and came to be seen both as secular temples and sites of entertainment in which the appreciation of high art coexisted with popular conviviality and the representation of social, political, and economic power. Just as the development of the operatic genre is inextricably linked to the rise of modern cities, it is also certain that much has changed since the inauguration of the first public opera house, the Teatro San Cassiano, in Venice, in 1637.

During the course of the twentieth-century, the emergence and advancement of new technologies of sound and image reproduction have been decisive factors in these transformations. It became possible to listen to and watch opera without attending a live performance. Further, after the introduction of synchronized sound in cinema, nothing prevented opera from being performed and recorded in places other than opera houses. Later, thanks to TV, live audio-visual broadcasts of opera became a reality, one which new digital technologies have enhanced ever since.

This conference seeks to assess technology’s impact on opera against the backdrop of its relationship to urbanity. The following question, in which issues of displacement and dissemination are weaved together, will stand at the centre of our discussions: how and to what extent did the development of audio-visual technologies allow for the visibility and audibility of opera beyond the theatre while at the same time encouraging its migration to other spaces? Many disparate practices invite this interrogation: from the live simulcasts that beam productions from opera houses to movie theatres, to the creation of new operas in town squares, train stations, old factories, swimming pools, and public transportation, not to mention community-oriented projects such as The Bicycle Opera Project or Operndorf Afrika, and open-air festivals, including the Arena di Verona Festival and the “Festival ao Largo” promoted by the National Theater of São Carlos (Lisbon Opera House).

Despite its widely reputed decline, opera is presently enjoying a moment of surprising vitality. This is true in the fields of reception and production alike, as new forms of staging and creating opera are being experimented with every year. By addressing the link between opera, technology, and the city, this conference will also attempt to draw attention to this very vitality. We hope to stimulate as broad an exchange and as open an inquiry as possible, encompassing issues of dramaturgy, criticism, spectatorship, remediation, technology, and composition, among others.

*

We welcome proposals from both scholars and practitioners across disciplines for 20-minute long papers exploring any of the above-mentioned topics. Please submit your abstract (of up to 250 words) to propera2020@gmail.com no later than April 15, 2019. The program will be announced in early May. This international conference is organized within the scope of the project “PROPERA – The Profanation of Opera: Music and Drama on Film” (funded through the European Commission under a Marie Skłodowska Curie Action) and is co-sponsored by the Centro de Estudos de Sociologia e Estética Musical (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas / Universidade Nova de Lisboa). More information here.

RMA Study Day: Music, Media and Technologies

Royal Musical Association Study Day
20 May 2017, Durham University, UK

Keynote speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)

View the full programme and registration form. All are welcome to attend:

For more information please contact Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk

Papers:

Daniel Gouly – The affordances of digital music tools in theory and practice

Alex Stevenson (Leeds Beckett University) – Digital aesthetics in contemporary popular music performance

Bridget Coulter (University of Sheffield) – Authenticity and auto-tune: technology and the construction of vocal ‘naturalness’ in popular music

Nigel Martin (University of Derby) – Interpreting recontextualised guitar in contemporary popular music practice

Danielle Beverly (Northwestern University in Qatar) – Analog artifacts in the Middle East: music, memory, materiality, movement

Stephen Wilford (City, University of London) – “This is just a band”: music, representation and digital technologies in the Middle East and North Africa

Safa Canalp (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) – Towards a notion of subcultural transfer: circulation of media, and hierarchies of knowledge, taste and behavior

Tat Amaro (Durham University) – Shaping the past, surviving the future: computer karaoke in contemporary piphat music-making in Phayao province, northern Thailand

Karlyn King (University of Birmingham) – Vinyl records vs digital ephemera: does the medium of music matter?

Anne-Marie Beaumont & Aglaia Foteinou (University of Wolverhampton) – Back to the future: auralization and its application in musical analysis

Elizabeth Hunt (University of Liverpool) – Video games live and the gamification of the symphony orchestra

Kate Mancey (University of Liverpool) – The hidden soundtrack: music making in Rez Infinite


[original CFP follows]

Music, Media and Technologies

RMA Study Day, Durham University, UK
Saturday 20 May 2017

Keynote Speaker: Frederick Moehn (King’s College London)
Call for Papers deadline: 3 March 2017

How do media and technology shape music-making, music experience, and music meaning? What contemporary and historical developments in these fields influence how music (of any kind) can be understood? How has music played a role in shaping wider media and technology environments?

This study day aims to attract scholars from across music’s sub-disciplines interested in analysing the significance of media and technologies in the production, dissemination and experience of music.

Research areas might include (but are not limited to) both contemporary and historical approaches to musicology, analysis, ethnomusicology, music technology, psychology, education, composition and performance. There are no restrictions on musical genres, eras, or research approaches.

Contributions from postgraduate students and Early Career Researchers are especially welcome.

The study day will be free for Royal Musical Association (RMA) and Durham University Music Department members. There will be a fee of £10 for non-members.

All papers will be of 20-minutes duration. Please send abstracts of up to 300 words.

For enquiries or to submit an abstract, please email Samuel Horlor at s.p.horlor@durham.ac.uk.
Deadline for receipt of abstracts: Friday 3 March 2017.

The following themes are of particular interest:

Media and technologies in music production:
– Musical instruments and creative tools
– Wider technologies around creation and live music-making
– Recording and the studio

The influences of technologies at the moments of inspiration, creation and live performance in music of any kind. These may be central to the production of sound (musical instruments, creative tools) or have a less direct impact (technologies bringing together musicians and listeners, technologies of the physical or media spaces for music-making). These themes might be approached from analytical, historical or social perspectives, as well as those of creative practice.

Media and technologies in music dissemination:
– Film, broadcast, and music industries
– New media (historical or contemporary perspectives)
– Media of music learning

The roles of media and technologies in how music is spread and encountered. Focuses may include the impacts of commercialisation and the proliferation of new media (from both historical and contemporary perspectives) upon the processes and products involved in learning and sharing music. They might be explored through analysis of both musical texts and wider social contexts.

Media and technologies in music experience:
– Technologies of listening and music’s integration into everyday life
– Issues of genre, transnationalism and cultural hybridity
– Impacts upon identities, politics and communities

The effects of media and technologies in music’s broader involvements and uses. Focus here may fall on audiences, listeners, amateurs and communal music-makers, for whom music is integrated into wider life through media and technologies. Suggested areas of exploration include impacts upon global music flows, and the shaping of communal and individual experiences with music.

The Music Encoding Conference

18–21 May, 2015
Florence, Italy

Conference Website: http://www.music-encoding.org/conference

Music encoding is now a prominent feature of various areas in musicology and music librarianship. The encoding of symbolic music data provides a foundation for a wide range of scholarship, and over the last several years, has garnered a great deal of attention in the digital humanities. This conference intends to provide an overview of the current state of data modeling, generation, and use, and aims to introduce new perspectives on topics in the fields of traditional and computational musicology, music librarianship, and scholarly editing, as well as in the broader area of digital humanities.

This conference aims to gather specialists in all the above areas, to discuss the current state of modeling, generation and use of music encoding, to exchange experiences, report on successful projects on major collections and composers, and to forge collaborations for future projects.

The program opens on Monday, May 18th with a pre-conference day devoted to workshops/tutorials on MEI and its application to scholarly publication, followed by two days of papers and poster presentations covering various theoretical and practical issues in research and publishing. The program is completed by a “Hack Day” on Thursday, May 21: an opportunity for everyone interested in using and improving MEI — developers, librarians, musicologists, editors, publishers — to investigate the topics they’re most interested in.

I Congreso Internacional Música y Cultura Audiovisual

MURCIA (SPAIN). 23,24,25 ENERO 2014
www.congresomuca.com

El I Congreso Internacional Música y Cultura Audiovisual, organizado por la Universidad de Murcia, tiene como finalidad incentivar el intercambio y difusión de conocimientos entre profesionales e investigadores del universo audiovisual y sonoro mediante el análisis, la reflexión y la crítica de la música como cultura en las cuatro últimas décadas.