Singing Speech and Speaking Melodies: Musical Theatre (1650-1918)

organized by
Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini (Lucca)

Research Group ERASMUSH, University of Oviedo (Oviedo, Spain)

Oviedo, Edificio Histórico de la Universidad
09 – 11 May 2019

Call for Papers

The Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini of Lucca and the Research Group ERASMUSH of the University of Oviedo (Spain) are pleased to invite submissions of proposals for the symposium «Singing Speech and Speaking Melodies: Musical Theatre (1650-1918)», to be held in Oviedo, Edificio Histórico de la Universidad de Oviedo (Historic Building of the University of Oviedo), from Thursday 9 to Saturday 11 May 2019.

This conference aims to deal with the complex world of the variety of stage works such as vaudeville, singspiel, zarzuela, operetta, opéra-comique, intermezzo, tonadilla or ballad opera, that were born around the establishment of Opera as a musical genre in different European Countries. Most of them with a long life, flourished during the 19th and the beginning of 20th century , becoming then a mass phenomenon that gathered a large audience. Despite the many differences, all of these forms of musical theatre share an alternation of sung parts and spoken dialogue , and some of them dance too. During their evolution and dissemination around the world, many of these genres of musical theater have maintained their denomination but changed their forms and literary-musical references, sometimes enriched with foreign contributions and inbreading between closely related genres. This development has created some epistemological problems about what zarzuela, operetta or opéra-comique means in the different periods of its life.

The programme committee encourages submissions within the following areas, although other topics are also welcome:

• Repertoire and analysis of models
• Dramaturgical roles of the singing & of the spoken word
• Literary sources and influences
• Sources, relationships and divergences
• Production system, consumption, entertainment system
• In & out of Europe: dissemination and adaptation of theatrical genres
• Performing practice: Do the singers speak or the actors sing?
• The public and its social component
• Musical aesthetics and criticism
• Scene, choreography and dance
• Costumes, Decorations and Scenic Design
• Editing theatrical music: from the piano to the orchestral accompaniment

Programme Committee:
• María Encina Cortizo (Universidad de Oviedo)
• Roberto Illiano (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Fulvia Morabito (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)
• Massimiliano Sala (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini)
• Ramón Sobrino (Universidad de Oviedo)

Keynote Speakers:
• María Encina Cortizo (Universidad de Oviedo)
• Michela Niccolai (LaM, Université libre de Bruxelles et IHRIM, Lyon2, Lyon)

The official languages of the conference are English, Spanish, French and Italian. Papers selected at the conference will be published in a miscellaneous volume.
Papers are limited to twenty minutes in length, allowing time for questions and discussion. Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words and one page of biography.
All proposals should be submitted by email no later than ***Sunday 3 February 2019*** to <conferences@luigiboccherini.org>. With your proposal please include your name, contact details (postal address, e-mail and telephone number) and (if applicable) your affiliation.
The committee will make its final decision on the abstracts by the end of February 2019, and contributors will be informed immediately thereafter. Further information about the programme, registration, travel and accommodation will be announced after that date.
For any additional information, please contact:

Dr. Massimiliano Sala
conferences@luigiboccherini.org
www.luigiboccherini.org

Embodied Monologues Symposium

Call for Papers and Performances

EMBODIED MONOLOGUES SYMPOSIUM — MARCH 31, 2017

MAYNOOTH UNIVERSITY, IRELAND

Deadline for Proposals: January 9, 2017

In recent years, the emergence of practice-based and performance-led research has generated dynamic, productive and provocative new forms of understanding in humanities scholarship. Knowledge and experience derived from embodied practices have done much to expand the epistemic fields centred on the body and its place in philosophy and aesthetics. Associated with these developments, topics such as voice, performativity and subjectivity have been transformed and have in turn reshaped contemporary political and social concerns, and questions of human rights, disabilities, inequality, gender, and racial and social segregation.

The emergence of movement philosophy and literature especially, as well as a greater emphasis on the performer’s body as predicated in contemporary theatre practices, has opened new pathways for research only recently applied to music performance. As the one and only dramatic figure in monologues and monodramas, the solo performer has unprecedented agency in the dramaturgy and enactment of the piece. Yet even in monodrama, a dramatic genre supposedly condensed into one stage figure, production and staging are still the result of multilayered processes and agencies.

Embodied Monologues seeks to generate responses and challenges to the idea of solo or ‘mono’ performance. What is the role of the intertextual, the multimedial, the intercorporeal in this mode of performance? According to Bakthin’s The Dialogic Imagination “the centripetal forces of the life of language, embodied in a unitary language, operate in the midst of heteroglossia”. In performance, monologues and monodramas demonstrate the dynamics of this notion, combining the individual and the collective, the solo and the dialogical in complex and revealing ways. The series will explore solo performance through practice and research across the humanities, investigating the multiple forces at work during the production and performative processes. Embodied Monologues aims to promote an interdisciplinary exchange among performers, researchers, and practitioners whose work is based primarily—however not exclusively—on solo performance.

Proposals are invited for individual papers, lecture recitals, research reports, posters, video-installations and specific sessions in any area of solo embodied or practice-led research. Deadline for abstract (maximum 300 words) and short bio (maximum 100 word) is January 9, 2017. Proposals should be uploaded at http://www.embodiedmonologues.com/

KEYNOTE EVENTS:

Catherine Laws, Senior Lecturer Department of Music University of York, Senior Research Fellow at the Orpheus Institute, Ghent (BE);

Róisín O’Gorman, Lecturer in Drama & Theatre Studies, University College Cork.

SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZER:

Francesca Placanica, Maynooth University Francesca.Placanica@nuim.ie

 

COMMITTEE:

Christopher Morris, Professor of Music, Maynooth University;

Francesca Placanica, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Maynooth University;

Benjamin Spatz, Senior Lecturer in Drama Theatre and Performance, University of Huddersfield.

 

3rd International Conference of Dalcroze Studies (ICDS3)

Call for submissions

3rd International Conference of Dalcroze Studies (ICDS3)

‘The living moment: Exploring improvisational practice’

30 July – 03 August 2017

Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

www.dalcroze-studies.com

 

The conference

The aim of ICDS3 is to present the best of current research and practice within Dalcroze Studies and related fields. ICDS is a global, transdisciplinary forum, open to viewpoints from education, the arts and humanities, and the social, health and life sciences. We welcome practitioners and scholars alike. This year our theme is improvisation in music, dance, somatic practices, theatre and therapy, with a special focus on the relationships between music/sound and movement.

 

Keynote speakers (confirmed)

Reto W. Kressig, Professor and Chair of Geriatrics, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel (UAB), Felix-Platter Hospital, University of Basel, Switzerland

Raymond MacDonald, Professor of Music Psychology and Improvisation, Reid School of Music, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Max van Manen, Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta, Canada

Keynote practitioners (confirmed)

Ruth Alperson (PhD), Dean, Hoff-Barthelson Music School, USA

Ruth Gianadda, Professor, Institute Jaques-Dalcroze, Geneva, Switzerland

Karin Greenhead, Director of Studies, Dalcroze UK

Lisa Parker, Director, Longy Dalcroze Institute, Longy School of Music of Bard College, USA

 

‘The living moment: Exploring improvisational practice’

Improvisation forms the basis of human communication from infancy to the end of life. It defines the moment-to-moment flow of activity in our everyday interactions and is fundamental to creativity and innovation.

Improvisation is also central to music, dance and somatic traditions across culture, time and space. Musical and movement improvisation can be put to work in many contexts, including the pedagogical, therapeutic and performative, to bring about transformation. Improvisation can be both process and product, and an agent of change.

In Dalcroze Eurhythmics and related fields of practice, musical and movement improvisation are the main means of communication between teacher and learner, therapist and client, and between participants themselves.

 

Call for proposals

We welcome presentations on improvisation, as it relates to Dalcroze Eurhythmics and music, movement and the mindful body more broadly. We embrace a wide range of disciplines and areas, such as: anthropology, architecture, biomedical science, communication science, cultural studies, dance studies, somatic practices, education, ethnomusicology, gender studies, history, literature, media studies, musicology, music therapy, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology, theatre and performance studies, and visual arts.

We invite practitioners and researchers to share their knowledge, experience and scholarship on this theme. Conference topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Music-movement improvisation
  • Descriptions and theories of improvisation
  • Improvisation and embodiment
  • Improvisation in culture and improvisation as culture
  • Improvisation as social relationship or dialogue
  • Improvisation as process, as product, as means
  • Interdisciplinary and intermedial approaches to improvisation
  • Teaching improvisation
  • The role of improvisation in pedagogy, performance, therapy and research
  • Teaching as an improvisational practice
  • Assessing and evaluating improvisation
  • Developing curricula and educational material on improvisation
  • Improvisation and the professional development of teachers
  • The interaction of technology and improvisation
  • Improvisation and wellbeing
  • Personal and social development through improvisation
  • Improvisation and ethics (empowerment, social justice)
  • Improvisation and community
  • The historical development and transmission of improvisational practice in Dalcroze Eurhythmics and related fields

 

Types of presentation

  • Paper* (20 mins + 10 mins discussion) – research papers and reflections on practice
  • Workshop* (60 mins, including discussion) – an interactive session offering hands-on experience. These will be limited in number due to space and time restrictions
  • Symposium (90 mins, including discussion) – a shared platform for at least three delegates to present a specific research topic in-depth and to discuss each other’s work in a public forum. Please specify who will chair the symposium.
  • Roundtable (90 mins, including discussion) – a semi-planned conversation amongst stakeholders who wish to have a public dialogue to which delegates can contribute. Instead of presenting research results, a roundtable is a public discussion with a view to arriving at shared understandings, new insights and/or proposals for action. Please specify who will chair the roundtable.
  • Informal daytime performance (duration variable, to be arranged with organising committee)
  • Evening performance (duration variable, to be arranged with organising committee)
  • Poster
  • Presentation to host ICDS5 in 2021 (20 mins + 10 mins discussion); we would love to hear from organisations or institutions in any country who would like to host a future conference! 

 

Submission

Submit your proposal/s at www.dalcroze-studies.com

Deadline for all submissions: Sunday 27 November 2016 23:59 (BST)

The language of presentations is English.

Delegates may submit a maximum of three proposals.

Notification to presenters by 18 December 2016

 

Online registration

Presenters must register and pay by 13 January 2017

All other delegates must register and pay by 30 June 2017

 

Fees*

Before 31 March 2017 (Early bird rates): Regular $375; Student $250

After 31 March 2017: Regular $450; Student $325

Fee includes refreshments, light lunch and conference materials

(*All fees are in Canadian dollars and subject to tax by the Federal / Provincial government; please go to the registration pages for more information)

 

Scientific Committee

Dr John Habron (Senior Lecturer) Coventry University, Coventry, UK (Chair)

Dr Ruth Alperson (Dean) Hoff-Barthelson Music School, New York, USA

Karin Greenhead (Director of Studies) Dalcroze UK

Dr Marja-Leena Juntunen (Professor) Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts, Helsinki, Finland

Dr Louise Mathieu (Professor) Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Dr Selma Odom (Professor Emerita) York University, Toronto, Canada

Dr Jane Southcott (Associate Professor) Monash University, Victoria, Australia

 

Organising Committee

Prof. Josée Vaillancourt (Chair), Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Prof. Louise Mathieu (Co-Chair), Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Prof. Ursula Stuber, Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada

Prof. Gilles Comeau, University of Ottawa, Canada

 

www.dalcroze-studies.com

 

 

 

 

 

First International Conference of Dalcroze Studies

24-26 July 2013
Coventry University, UK

www.eventsforce.net/dalcrozeconference

Our conference
In recent years there has been an upsurge in the academic study of embodiment and the centrality of movement and rhythm in music cognition, education and performance. This conference seeks to extend our understanding of Dalcroze Eurhythmics from these and a wide variety of other perspectives: historical, cultural, socio-political, theoretical, philosophical and empirical. It also seeks to promote interdisciplinary dialogue between researchers into Dalcroze Eurhythmics and those from a wide field of related disciplines and practices.

2013 sees the centenary of the London School of Dalcroze Eurhythmics (LSDE), founded to promote the teaching method of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze (1865-1950) in the UK. This is the first international conference of Dalcroze Studies and is part of the celebrations to mark the centenary of the LSDE.

Confirmed keynote speakers
Prof. Louise Mathieu, Université Laval, Canada
Prof. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, University of Oregon, USA
Dr Katie Overy, University of Edinburgh, UK
Dr Joan Pope OAM, President Dalcroze Australia
Dr Selma Odom (Professor Emerita), York University, Canada

Delegate fee- £120
Fee includes lunch & refreshments, conference materials, performances and historical exhibitions

Registration closes 24 June 2013

www.eventsforce.net/dalcrozeconference

Call for abstracts
The conference committee invites presentations on topics such as, but not limited to, the following:

• Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, his teaching, writings, composition and improvisation, and his musical, philosophical and cultural influences
• The history and impact of Dalcroze Eurhythmics worldwide
• The relationships between Dalcroze Eurhythmics, theatre, dance and other educational and somatic practices
• Past and present applications of Dalcroze Eurhythmics
• Current pedagogical practice
• Dalcroze, health and wellbeing
• The Dalcroze identity

It is an aim of the conference to foster interdisciplinary practice and research between Dalcroze and other fields. Therefore, we also welcome related presentations on music, movement and the body from a range of disciplines and perspectives including: aesthetics, dance, ethnomusicology, evolutionary biology, gender politics, improvisation, music analysis, music pedagogy, music therapy, musicology, neuroscience, performance studies, phenomenology, psychology, somatic practices and spirituality.

Performances of Jaques-Dalcroze’s music or related repertoire are welcome as well as presentations of plastique animée, theatrical or dance work. Poster presentations may be invited, depending on the amount of submissions received.

Timing
The conference committee invites researchers and practitioners to submit abstracts for:
Papers (20 mins)
Dalcroze teaching demonstrations (60 mins)
Workshops (45 mins)
Symposia- a shared platform for three researchers/practitioners to present a specific topic in-depth (60 mins)
Position papers- short papers setting out an idea and asking for feedback (7 mins)
Performances- timings to be arranged with conference committee

All presentations will be followed by additional time for discussion.

Submission
Please submit the following information:
• Title of presentation
• Type of presentation (paper, symposium etc.)
• Name/s of presenter/s
• Affiliation/s
• Requirements (e.g. audiovisual, spaces, instruments)
• Contact details
• Description (If a research paper, please use the following headings: introduction, methodology, results and discussion)

All submissions must be no more than 300 words

To submit your paper please click here

Deadline for submissions: 07 January 2013
Notification of outcome by 28 February 2013

Conference committee
Dr John Habron, Coventry University, UK (chair)
Dr Ruth Alperson (Dean), Hoff-Barthelson Music School, USA
Karin Greenhead (Director of Studies), Dalcroze Society UK
Dr Marja-Leena Juntunen, Sibelius Academy, Finland
Prof. Reto W. Kressig MD (Chair of Geriatrics), University of Basel, Switzerland
Dr Louise Mathieu, Université Laval, Canada
Dr Sandra Nash, Dalcroze Australia
Dr Selma Odom (Professor Emerita), York University, Canada
Dr Joan Pope OAM, President Dalcroze Australia
Dr Jane Southcott (Associate Professor), Monash University, Australia

Questions?
For general questions about the event or submission of abstracts please contact Julia Baron, 02476 888236 or email: Julia.Baron@coventry.ac.uk

For questions regarding the content of the conference, or for information on becoming a conference partner/sponsor, please contact John Habron by email: John.Habron@coventry.ac.uk